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New York University Steinhardt School of Education 2002-2004 Bulletin

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Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

print copies of the information for your own personal use, store the files on your own computer for personal use only, or reference this material from your own documents.

The Career Guidance Foundation reserves the right to revoke such authorization at any time, and any such use shall be discontinued immediately upon written notice from the Career Guidance Foundation. Disclaimer CollegeSource digital catalogs are converted from either the original printed catalog or electronic media supplied by each school. Although every attempt is made to ensure accurate conversion of data, the Career Guidance Foundation and the schools which provide the data do not guarantee that this information is accurate or correct. The information provided should be used only as reference and planning tools. Final decisions should be based and confirmed on data received directly from each school.

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2002-2004

The Steinhardt School of Education (Undergraduate Division) A

N N O U N C E M E N T

F O R

T H E

Contents How to Use This Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 An Introduction to New York University . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Schools and Colleges of the University New York University and New York An Introduction to The Steinhardt School of Education 10 Special Programs and Centers Guide to Areas of Interest and Study (Chart) . . . . . . . 13 University, School, and Alumni Award Recipients for Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Degree Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 NYU Teacher Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Descriptions of Academic Programs Applied Psychological Studies, 20 Art, 24 Childhood, Early Childhood, and Special Education, 30 Communication Studies, 38 Educational Theatre, 42 English Education, 46 Foreign Language Education, 50 Mathematics Education, 54 Music, 58 Nursing, 68

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A S H I N G T O N

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Q U A R E

111

T H

A N D

112

T H

S

E S S I O N S

Nutrition and Food Studies, 76 Science Education, 82 Social Studies Education, 88 Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, 92 Dance Education, 96 The Steinhardt School of Education Minors, 97 Liberal Arts Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Student Activities/University Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Community Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Registration and Advisement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Undergraduate Study/General Requirements . . . . . . 176 Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 HEGIS Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Travel Directions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200, 202 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206

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Notice: The policies, requirements, course offerings, schedules, activities, tuition, fees, and calendar of the school and its departments and programs set forth in this bulletin are subject to change without notice at any time at the sole discretion of the administration. Such changes may be of any nature, including, but not limited to the elimination of the school, programs, classes, or activities; the relocation of or modification of the content of any of the foregoing; and the cancellation of scheduled classes or other academic activities. Payment of tuition or attendance at any classes shall constitute a student’s acceptance of the administration’s rights as set forth in the above paragraph. New York University Bulletin (USPS-383620), Vol. CII, No. 9, April 29, 2002. Published weekly from March for 12 consecutive issues by New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York, NY 10003-6688. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional entry offices. Postmaster: Send address change to New York University Bulletin, 547 La Guardia Place, New York, NY 10012-1464.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

2 • New York University • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

How to Use This Bulletin

CHOOSING A PROGRAM THAT MEETS YOUR GOAL

Welcome to The Steinhardt School of Education at New York University. This bulletin is designed to assist all types of students—those considering college for the first time, those thinking of transferring from a community college or four-year institution, and those already attending NYU—in choosing the program of study that best fits their aspirations and goals. In this bulletin you’ll find not only admissions guidelines, financial aid information, and academic requirements—you’ll also learn about different kinds of professional training and career opportunities available to you through study at The Steinhardt School of Education so that you can make an educated decision about your own future. In addition, the bulletin describes many aspects of student life at New York University and The Steinhardt School of Education and the opportunities you’ll find for personal growth and stimulation outside the classroom. If you’re thinking about applying to NYU, follow these steps:

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • 3

Step 2: Turn to Degree Programs, beginning on page 15, for each program that interests you. There you’ll find out about the program’s course of study and special features, such as internships or clinical experiences. Read carefully the section on Career Opportunities.

Step 3: Examine closely the Sample Curriculum Worksheet or Sample Program of Study for each program that interests you. The worksheet or program gives you an idea of the course schedule for a typical student in that program. If you’d like, look up the descriptions for some of the courses listed in the worksheet or program. Courses for The Steinhardt School of Education classes are listed numerically beginning on page 111. Titles of courses that fulfill the liberal arts requirements (Morse Academic Plan—MAP) begin on page 102. Consider also the section on Study Options on the Sample Curriculum Worksheet. If you want to explore related programs, look for the box on Other Programs to See.

04 • 15 2002-20 Bulletin ation of Educ School inhardt The Ste

PROGRAMS OF STUD Y

s rogram P e e r g De

PA G E

20

24

Art (Studio)

❏ Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education

Page

SC IE NC E ED UC AT IO N:

1

Pamela Fra Curriculum ser-Abder (212) 998 Coordinator -5208 Department and Learnin of Teaching The Steinha g Education rdt School of New York Uni East Buildin versity Suite 637 g, 239 Greene New York, Street NY 100036674

TE AC HI NG

4

*May be exempt by examinatio n—subst itute

4 will be a

liberal arts

SC IE NC E ED UC AT IO N:

(For Fres hman and Sophomore Transfer

TE AC HI NG

Students)

ndation Conver sati s of Contempor ons of the ary West. V55 Culture: Foundation .04•• World Cul s of Contempor tures. V55 ary Culture .05•• : Foundation Societies s of Contempor and the Social Scieary Culture: Writing nce s. V55.06• the Essay. • V40.010 0 The Adv anced Col lege Essa Foreign y. V40.011 Language 0 I Speech Com munication s.* E21.003 Calculus 3 I. V63.002 1

32 Points

BI OL OG Y,

• Choose a major (follow Steps 1, 2, and 3 above). • Keep track of your academic progress (review the Sample Curriculum Worksheet or Sample Program of Study for your program of study). • Review courses for both required and elective courses (courses are listed numerically, beginning on page 111). • Select courses that meet the liberal arts requirements. Course titles begin on page 102.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

2

1 Four bio logy cou rses by adv isement: V23.003

5 6

111. Fac ulty, pag e

179. •

16

SA MP LE PR OG RA M

OF ST UDY

Teaching .0001 and Learnin Teaching 4 Human g II. E27.100 Develop High Sch of Science: Inte ment I. E63 2 rmediate ool. E14 4 Education .0020 .1039 and of Studen Supervised ts with Dis 4 Classroom in Middle Student Teachin abilities. School. E14 E75.100 g of Scie Manageme Practicum: Plan 5 nce .1149 4 ning, Ass nt, and Tec Supervised essm hno ent Stu logy Education , dent in High Sch . E27.105 as a Soc 0 ool. E14 Teaching of Scie ial .104 nce Inst itution. E20 6 4 Human Dev .1015 elopmen t I: Early Ado 3 Human lescence. Develop E63.0023 ment II: Ado 2 Language lescence. E63.002 Education.Acquisition and 4 Literacy 2 E27.103 0 School Vio (2 hours). lence Prevention 4 E81.199 Workshop 0 0

CH EM IS TRY,

GR AD ES 712

Content Core

General Chemistry 54 Point I and II. V25 s Organic .0101/0102 Chemistry I and II. V25 8 Organic .0243/0244 and II. V25Chemistry Labora 4 8 .0245/0246 tor y I Introductio n to Lab 4 orator y Tec 4 Introductio hniques. n to Qu V25.010 4 antitative 3 2 General Analysis. Physics I V25.010 4 and II. V85 4 2 Calculus .0011/0012 II. V63.002 4 2 10 Physical Chemistry 5 4 es • 14 I and II. V25 Experim .0651/0 ersity Servic 4 ental Me thods. V25 ivities/Univ652 4 *May be 8 One che .0661 t Act elective. exempt by exam mistry cou ination— • Studen substitut -2004 rse (by advisem e will be 4 02 20 a liberal ent) lletin arts • Libera tion Bu l 4 of Educa The Ste arts requirem ents, seeinhardt School inhardt School The Ste page 102. of Edu cation cou rses, pag e 111. Fac ulty, pag e 179. • 4

es y Servic t i s r e v i s/Un Activitie Student

If you’re already a student at The Steinhardt School of Education, you can also use this bulletin for the following:

GR AD ES 712

elective.

• Libera l The Ste arts requirem ents, see inhardt School of Educatpage 102. ion cou rses, pag e

Liberal Art s (Gener Educatio al n Require ments) Fou

Once you’ve reviewed the programs offered, go to page 145 for information on Student Activities/ University Services at NYU and the school.

Finally, turn to page 157 for information on Admission, Registration and Advisement, and Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid.

AREAS OF INTERES T

Applied Psychological Studies

Page

Bulletin 2002-2004 • 13

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V25.024 Abuse IdenAlcohol Educatis of Teachers: 4 0 The Adv E27.0005). and Cell 5 anced Col on, Child tification study culm s program of Biology I E03.000 Field Ob lege Essa 2 (15 hours). Introductio 1 and II. V23 ser vations 4 Foreign y. V40.011 n to Lab semesters inates in two E81.199 .0021/0022 Other Edu Language 0 orator y Tec 9 of 0 cational in Schools and I 8 Introductio opportuniti teaching hniques. Settings. 1 4 Speech Com n to Qu V25.010 Specialize Inquiries E27.000 antitative munication 3 2 into Teachin 5 or indepen es in a public d General Analysis. Ped .* E21.003 4 g Calculus dent school Phy ago and V25 sics I. V85 1 Inquiries gical Co Learning .0104 3 I. V63.002 setting. .001 into I. E27 re

Step 4: Step 5:

TE AC HIN G

Turn to the Guide to Areas of Interest and Study on page 13. Find the undergraduate programs that fall within your area of interest.

The Steinhardt School of Education

Guide to Areas of Interest and Study

HE HU ALTH MA , NU N SE RSI RV NG ICE ,AN S D CO PSY UNSE CH LIN OLO G A GY ND ART AN ISTIC DP ER EXPR FO RM ESSIO AN CE N WR CO ITTE MM N A UN ND ICA VE TIO RBA L NS TE C MA HNO AD NAG LOG MIN EM Y, IST ENT, RA A TIO ND PU N BLI SERV C A ICE ND N /ED O UC NPR AT O ION FIT MU MU LTILIN LTIC G ULT UAL, UR AL TE ST A UD WIT CHIN IES LA H SP G ST NG UA EECH UDEN GE A T DIS ND S OR FO DE RS SEE R MO PA RE IN GE IND FORM ICA AT TE ION D ,

Step 1:

SA MP LE PR OG RA M

12 Points 4 4 4

OTHER PROG

RAMS TO • Nursing SEE: • Nutritio n and Die tetics

OF ST UDY

Comm Pedagoon gical Co re

New Stu 33 School Violence Pre dent Sem vention Wo Points (2 hours). E81.199 (taken with inar rkshop 0 E27.0005). The Soc E03.000 Field Ob 1 ser vations Drug andial Responsibilitie Other Edu IdentificatioAlcohol Educatis of Teachers: 0 cational in Schools and on, Child Settings. n (15 hou Inquiries E27.000 Abuse rs). E81.199 into Teachin 5 9 g and Lea 1 Inquiries rning I. E27 into Teachin .0001 Specia g and Lea 4 Human d rning II. E27 Pedagolize Develop .1002 gical Co ment I. E63 4 re Education .0020 of Studen Teaching ts with Dis 4 Classroom High Sch of Science: Inte abilities. rmediate ool. E14 E75.100 Manageme Practicum: Plan .1039 and 5 4 ning nt, and Tec Supervised hnology. , Assessment, Education in Middle Student Teachin E27.105 as a Soc School. E14 0 g of Scie ial Institut nce .1149 4 Human Dev Supervised ion. E20.101 elopmen 5 in High Sch Student Teachin t I: Early Ado 3 Human g of Scie ool. E14 lescence. Develop .104 nce 6 E63.0023 ment II: Ado 2 Language lescence. OTHER E63.002 Education.Acquisition and 4 PROGRA Literacy 2 E27.103 MS TO 0 • Mat 4

hematics Edu cation • Nursing • Nutritio n and Die tetics

Admis sion

1

12 Points 4 4 4

SEE:

The Ste inhard t Scho ol of Ed ucation Bulle tin 20 02-200 4 • Ad missio n • 15

7

PICK

LAST ROM UP F I N ET BULL 147 PAGE

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4 • New York University • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

An Introduction to New York University

A CENTER OF HIGHER LEARNING OPEN TO ALL

Over 170 years ago, Albert Gallatin, the distinguished statesman who served as secretary of the treasury under President Thomas Jefferson, declared his intention to establish “in this immense and fastgrowing city . . . a system of rational and practical education fitting for all and graciously opened to all.” This is how New York University came to be founded. At that time—1831—most students in American colleges and universities were members of the privileged classes. Albert Gallatin and the University’s founding fathers planned NYU as a center of higher learning that would be open to all, regardless of national origin, religious belief, or social background. Albert Gallatin would scarcely recognize New York University today. From a student body of 158, enrollment has grown to nearly 50,000 students attending 14 schools and colleges at six different locations in Manhattan. Students come from every state in the union and from many foreign countries. The faculty, which initially consisted of 14 professors (among them artist and inventor Samuel F. B. Morse), now totals over 5,000.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • 5

Ceremonies, Traditions, and Symbols FOUNDERS DAY In 1830, when New York University was only an idea, the founders stated the need and the intent for establishing “in the City of New York a university on a liberal foundation, which shall correspond with the spirit and wants of our age and country, which shall be commensurate with our great and growing population, and which shall enlarge the opportunities of education for such of our youth as shall be found qualified and inclined to improve them.” Now in the fourth quarter of its first two hundred years of existence, NYU has grown to proportions that, in all likelihood, the founders never imagined. Still, the University remains faithful to their vision. Founders Day is a festive celebration that perpetuates the heritage of its founders, who conceived and incorporated an innovative institute of higher learning, and honors the candidates for baccalaureate degrees whose academic achievements qualify them for recognition as University Honors Scholars. It also serves as the backdrop for recognizing distinguished teachers at NYU. COMMENCEMENT The spirit of Commencement has remained the same since the first public Commencement took place in 1834 and a procession of students, faculty, and public dignitaries marched from City Hall, through Broadway and Liberty Street, to the Middle Dutch Church. Through the generations, Commencement has signified that no goal is insurmountable provided people respond with enthusiasm, intelligence, and perseverance. A grand outdoor ceremony in Washington Square Park has been the NYU Commencement tradition since 1976. The ceremony begins with the trumpet fanfare atop the Washington Memorial Arch—a fitting beginning for the new life ahead for our graduates. UNIVERSITY SEAL The University seal is composed of five emblems that embrace the goals and traditions of New York University. MDCCCXXXI is 1831, the year of incorporation for NYU, then known as the University of the City of New-York. “New York University” became the legal name of the institution in 1896, although this was its popular name long before then. The motto, perstare et praestare—to persevere and to excel—underscores the depiction of classic runners. When combined, these symbols represent the continued pursuit of academic excellence. Finally, there is the upheld torch of the Lady of the Harbor, which signifies NYU in service to the “metropolis”—New York City.

UNIVERSITY LOGO In 1965, the University administration commissioned renowned graphic artist Ivan Chermayeff to design a new logo. The University emblem, the torch, was modernized, and its simple yet elegant lines adorn virtually all NYU publications. From 1966 to the present, this torch has been synonymous with NYU. UNIVERSITY TORCH This prized silver heirloom, designed by Tiffany & Company of New York and “symbolic of academic purpose and authority,” was a gift from Helen Miller Gould in 1911. The torch and torchbearer always lead the academic processions in major University ceremonies. At Commencement, it is passed from a senior faculty member to the youngest graduating student. UNIVERSITY COLOR: VIOLET NICKNAME: VIOLETS In the late 1880s, it was the custom to plant violets in the yardwide strip of grass around the buttresses of the old Washington Square buildings that then served as NYU’s campus. It is generally accepted that both the school color and the nickname evolved from the flowers. ALMA MATER NYU’s Alma Mater, “New York University Evensong,” was written in 1900 by Duncan MacPherson Genns. “Dear Old NYU” became even more appropriate in 1945 when Dorothy I. Pearce, a Washington Square College student, wrote a third verse. As the earlier verses paid homage to the University Heights campus (part of NYU from 1895-1973), Pearce’s verse praised “the archway that ever stands triumphant” and symbolically links NYU to the surrounding community.

The Schools and Colleges of the University The University includes 14 schools and colleges at six major centers in Manhattan. In addition, the University operates branch campus programs in Westchester County at Manhattanville College and in Rockland County at St. Thomas Aquinas College. Certain of the University’s research facilities, notably the Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, are located in Sterling Forest, near Tuxedo, New York. Although overall the University is large, the divisions are small- to moderate-sized units—each with its own traditions, programs, and faculty. Enrollment in the undergraduate divisions ranges between 90 and 6,200. While some introductory classes in some programs have large numbers of students, many classes are small. More than 2,500

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

courses are offered, leading to more than 25 different degrees. The College of Arts and Science offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in a wide range of programs in the humanities, science, social sciences, and foreign languages and literatures and, in some departments, the Bachelor of Science degree. Joint programs of study currently involve NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, Graduate School of Arts and Science, The Steinhardt School of Education, Shirley M. Ehrenkranz School of Social Work, School of Medicine, and College of Dentistry, as well as Stevens Institute of Technology. The School of Law is one of the oldest law schools in the United States. It offers a comprehensive first professional program leading to the degree of Juris Doctor and a graduate curriculum leading to the degrees of Master of Laws, Master of Comparative Jurisprudence, and Doctor of Juridical Science. The School of Medicine and Post-Graduate Medical School offer the Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy degrees and courses for accreditation designed to meet the needs of physicians in practice. Medical students and residents gain clinical experience through the NYU Hospitals Center, which includes the 726-bed Tisch Hospital and the 174-bed Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, both of which are part of the Mount Sinai-NYU Medical Center and Health System. The school also maintains affiliations with select institutions for a variety of joint academic and clinical programs. Most clinical teaching takes place at the 1,232-bed Bellevue Hospital, where the School of Medicine supervises care. Other affiliated hospitals include the Hospital for Joint Diseases, NYU Downtown Hospital, and the New York Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The Cooperative Care unit, housed in the Arnold and Marie Schwartz Health Care Center, offers an innovative health care program in which patients receive health care and educational services in a centralized area with the assistance of a live-in relative or friend. The school’s Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine is one of the world’s leading medical research centers, with research emphasizing the biomolecular roots of disease. Specific areas of focus include developmental genetics, molecular pathogenesis, neurobiology, and structural biology. The College of Dentistry is the third oldest and the largest private dental school in the United States. It offers a predoctoral program leading to the Doctor of Dental Surgery degree, as well as advanced education programs in the dental specialties and allied health programs in dental hygiene and dental assisting. The patient care clinics, laboratories, and other teaching facilities

6 • New York University • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

that comprise the College of Dentistry are housed within several buildings, including the Arnold and Marie Schwartz Hall of Dental Sciences and the K. B. Weissman Clinical Science Building. The center is located on First Avenue, from East 24th Street to East 25th Street, in the midst of one of the nation’s most renowned health sciences complexes, which extends from East 14th Street to East 34th Street. The Graduate School of Arts and Science offers the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Fine Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy in most areas of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Several certificate programs are also offered. The NYU in Paris and NYU in Madrid programs are based in centers in Paris and Madrid. Dual degree programs of study currently involve the School of Law, the School of Medicine, the Leonard N. Stern School of Business, and the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. Courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening as well as during the day. The Steinhardt School of Education offers a broad range of innovative undergraduate preprofessional and professional programs and advanced graduate study in education, health, communications, and the arts professions. Undergraduate programs lead to the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Music degrees and combine a solid foundation in the liberal arts with specialized course work and fieldwork, clinical practice, or internships in a wide variety of settings throughout New York City. Graduate students may enroll in master’s, advanced certificate, and doctoral programs in a wide variety of disciplines. Courses are given weekdays, evenings, weekends, and summers to full-time, part-time, and special students. Study abroad is available for undergraduates during the academic year and for graduate students during the summer. Applied research opportunities abound for all students. The Leonard N. Stern School of Business is located in a three-building complex that comprises Tisch and Shimkin Halls and the state-ofthe-art Henry Kaufman Management Center, which houses the graduate programs. The Washington Square complex is adjacent to the University’s renowned Elmer Holmes Bobst Library and Study Center. The Stern School offers B.S., M.B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees. Students may specialize in accounting, economics, finance, information systems, international business, management, marketing, operations management; statistics, or actuarial science. Joint graduate-level programs are offered with the School of Law and the Graduate School of Arts and Science. Enrollment in the graduate program may be full or part time.

The Undergraduate College of the Stern School of Business administers the undergraduate business program. This program offers an innovative curriculum that integrates liberal arts studies with business studies. Through this course of study, students are exposed in a distinctive manner to the international dimensions of business; develop strong interpersonal and team-building skills; gain a sense of professional responsibility; and undertake cross-disciplinary course work while retaining a strong individualized component through elective course work. The undergraduate curriculum is a full-time course of study. The School of Continuing and Professional Studies for more than 60 years has provided courses and credentials designed to meet the cultural and career needs of today’s adult population. The school boasts a wide range of noncredit classes in information technologies and digital media; e-business; real estate and construction; publishing; marketing and management; film and video; creative writing; international affairs; foreign languages; hospitality; finance and law; and more. The Virtual College™, SCPS’s distance learning component, hosts a growing number of on-line courses across a variety of disciplines. SCPS also offers workshops for adults considering a career change or returning to college, as well as opportunities to study for an associate’s, bachelor’s, or a master’s degree. The Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service offers curricula in public administration, including nonprofit management, financial management, public policy analysis, comparative and development administration, and international administration; urban public policy studies; urban planning; and health policy and management. Master’s and doctoral degree programs are offered. The Advanced Professional Certificate Programs and the Master of Science in Management Program offer career development opportunities for experienced professionals, including the Advanced Management Program for Clinicians (AMPC). Joint degree programs are available with the College of Arts and Science, the School of Law, The Steinhardt School of Education, the School of Medicine, and the Shirley M. Ehrenkranz School of Social Work. Courses for full-time and part-time students are offered in the late afternoon and evening. Special Saturday programs are available in public and nonprofit management and in health services management. The Shirley M. Ehrenkranz School of Social Work offers Bachelor of Science, Master of Social Work, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The bachelor’s program prepares students for beginning social work practice immediately on graduation and for admission to graduate programs with advanced standing. The master’s program

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prepares students for the core mission of social work and provides an advanced concentration in clinical social work. The doctoral program offers a concentration in clinical social work. It prepares graduates to assume leadership positions as researchers, advanced practitioners, and educators. The school also offers an Advanced Certificate in Clinical Social Work and a PostMaster’s Certificate Program in the Treatment of Alcohol- and Drug-Abusing Clients. The Tisch School of the Arts, founded in 1965, provides undergraduate and graduate training in aspects of the performing and visual arts. Departments and programs offering professional training are acting, dance, design, drama, performance studies, film and television, cinema studies, photography and imaging,. dramatic writing, musical theatre, and interactive telecommunications. Degrees offered are the B.F.A., M.F.A., M.P.S., and, through the Graduate School of Arts and Science, the M.A. and Ph.D. The Gallatin School of Individualized Study was organized to promote innovative degree programs. It combines flexible curricula and rigorous standards. The Gallatin School offers an undergraduate program, leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree, and the Master of Arts Degree Program. The Mount Sinai School of Medicine offers the M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in addition to a combined M.D./Ph.D. program in a rigorous intellectual environment focused on collaboration between faculty and students. The school is committed to training students to be not only outstanding clinicians and scientists but compassionate individuals who also serve science and society. The school became affiliated with New York University on July 1, 1999. 1832 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE 1835 SCHOOL OF LAW 1841 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 1865 COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 1886 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCE 1890 THE STEINHARDT SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 1900 LEONARD N. STERN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 1934 SCHOOL OF CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • 7

1938 ROBERT F. WAGNER GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE 1948 POST-GRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL 1960 SHIRLEY M. EHRENKRANZ SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 1965 TISCH SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 1972 GALLATIN SCHOOL OF INDIVIDUALIZED STUDY 1963 MOUNT SINAI SCHOOL OF MEDICINE (affiliated July 1, 1999)

New York University and New York The Libraries Nine distinct libraries at the University contain approximately 4.4 million volumes. The Elmer Holmes Bobst Library and Study Center is one of the largest open-stack research libraries in the nation. Designed for easy access, the library has more than three million books and journals, plus microforms, video- and audiotapes, and other materials located in stacks where students are free to browse. The library also has hundreds of study carrels interspersed among the open book stacks plus five major reading rooms; up to 3,500 students may comfortably study here at any one time. The stacks are open until midnight, and study areas on the A and B levels are open 24 hours during the academic year. The library has networked carrels for personal laptop access to research material and the Internet. Laptop computers are also available for use in the library. Among the noteworthy collections of the Bobst Library are those in American and English literature and history, economics, education, science, music, United Nations documents, Near Eastern and Ibero-American languages and literatures, and Judaica and Hebraica. Specialized services include the Business Reference Center, the Avery Fisher Center for Music and Media, the Tamiment Library on the history of radicalism, the Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives on the history of the New York City labor movement, the New York University Archives, the Fales Library and Special Collections featuring English and American Literature since 1750, the Berol Collection of Lewis Carroll materials, the Downtown Writers Collection, and numerous rare books and manuscripts.

libraries’ holdings, including electronic journals, databases, and texts. It may be searched in any of the University libraries or over the Internet. Students can also connect at computer workstations in the library or from home to hundreds of electronic journals, texts, and periodical databases through the library’s Web site, www.nyu.edu/library/bobst. The Law Library contains over 751,000 volumes and is strong in a variety of areas, including legal history, biography, jurisprudence, and copyright, taxation, criminal, labor, business, and international law (including primary source materials of the United Nations and European Union), plus emerging legal specialties such as urban affairs, poverty law, and consumerism. The Frederick L. Ehrman Medical Library at the Medical Center contains more than 174,000 volumes, 3,700 periodicals, computer software, and audiovisuals. The John and Bertha E. Waldmann Memorial Library at the College of Dentistry contains over 39,000 bound volumes and 570 periodicals, computer software, and audiovisuals as well as one of the largest collections of rare books on dentistry in the country, including the Weinberger Collection, the Blum Collection, and the Mestel St. Apollonia Collection. The Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences Library has a highly specialized research collection of over 68,000 volumes in mathematics, computer science, and physics.

The Grey Art Gallery, the University’s fine arts museum, presents three to four innovative exhibitions each year that encompass all aspects of the visual arts: painting and sculpture, prints and drawings, photography, architecture and decorative arts, video, film, and performance. The gallery also sponsors lectures, seminars, symposia, and film series in conjunction with its exhibitions. Admission to the gallery is free for NYU staff, faculty, and students. The New York University Art Collection, founded in 1958, consists of more than 5,000 works in a wide range of media. The collection is comprised primarily of late-19th-century and 20thcentury works; its particular strengths are American painting from the 1940s to the present and 20th-century European prints. A unique segment of the NYU Art Collection is the Ben and Abby Weed Grey Collection of Contemporary Asian and Middle Eastern Art, which totals some 1,000 works in various media representing countries from Israel to Japan. The Larger Campus New York University is an integral part of the metropolitan community of New York City—the business, cultural, artistic, and financial center of the nation and the home of the United Nations. The city’s extraordinary resources enrich both the academic programs and the experiences of living at New York University.

The Stephen Chan Library of Fine Arts is a reference collection of over 152,000 volumes in the history of art of all periods, classical archaeology, and the conservation of paintings and sculpture.

Professors whose extracurricular activities include service as editors for publishing houses and magazines; as advisers to city government, banks, school systems, and social agencies; and as consultants for museums and industrial corporations bring to teaching an experience of the world and a professional sophistication that are difficult to match.

The Conservation Center Library supports the research and curricular needs of the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts. It is a highly specialized, noncirculating collection on the study of the technology and conservation of works of art and historic artifacts. It includes approximately 14,000 volumes and 220 periodicals.

Students also, either through course work or in outside activities, tend to be involved in the vigorous and varied life of the city. Research for term papers in the humanities and social sciences may take them to such diverse places as the American Museum of Natural History, the Museum of Modern Art, a garment factory, a deteriorating neighborhood, or a foreign consulate.

The Jack Brause Library of the Real Estate Institute provides a unique reference and research resource of 1,900 volumes about the New York real estate market for students and real estate professionals.

Students in science work with their professors on such problems of immediate importance for urban society as the pollution of waterways and the congestion of city streets. Business majors attend seminars in corporation boardrooms and intern as executive assistants in business and financial houses. The schools, courts, hospitals, settlement houses, theatres, playgrounds, and prisons of the greatest city in the world form a regular part of the educational scene for students of medicine, dentistry, education, social work, law, business and public administration, and the creative and performing arts.

The Ettinghausen Library at the Hagop Kevorkian Center is a noncirculating reference collection, the majority of which is included in BobCat. The collection also includes representative area newspapers in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Hebrew, and English.

A computerized catalog, known as BobCat for Bobst Library Catalog, provides access to the

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

8 • New York University • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

The chief center for undergraduate and graduate study is at Washington Square in Greenwich Village, long famous for its contributions to the fine arts, literature, and drama and its personalized, smaller-scale, European style of living. New York University itself makes a significant contribution to the creative activity of the Village through the high concentration of faculty and students who reside within a few blocks of the University. University apartment buildings provide housing for more than 1,500 members of the faculty and administration, and University student residence halls accommodate over 11,500 men and women. Many more faculty and students reside in private housing in the area. A Private University Since its founding, New York University has been a private university. It operates under a board of trustees and derives its income from tuition, endowment, grants from private foundations and government, and gifts from friends, alumni, corporations, and other private philanthropic sources. The University is committed to a policy of equal treatment and opportunity in every aspect of its relations with its faculty, students, and staff members, without regard to age, citizenship status, color, disability, marital or parental status, national origin, race, religion, sex, or sexual orientation. Inquiries regarding the application of the federal laws and regulations concerning affirmative action and antidiscrimination policies and procedures at New York University may be referred to Sharon Weinberg, Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs, New York University, Elmer Holmes Bobst Library, 70 Washington Square South, Room 1202, New York, NY 10012-1091; (212) 998-2370. Inquiries may also be referred to the director of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance, U.S. Department of Labor. New York University is a member of the Association of American Universities and is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools (Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104; [215] 662-5606). Individual undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs and schools are accredited by the appropriate specialized accrediting agencies.

University Administration John E. Sexton, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., J.D., President David W. McLaughlin, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Provost Jacob J. Lew, B.A., J.D., Executive Vice President Robert Berne, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Senior Vice President for Health Richard Foley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chair, University Committee on Academic Priorities; Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science Harvey J. Stedman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice Chancellor Diane Yu, B.A., J.D., Chief of Staff and Deputy to the President Norman Dorsen, B.A., LL.B., Counselor to the President Debra LaMorte, B.A., J.D., Senior Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations S. Andrew Schaffer, B.A., LL.B., Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary of the University Richard N. Bing, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President for Budget and Resource Planning Lynne P. Brown, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President for University Relations and Public Affairs; Acting Vice President for Student Affairs Robert Goldfeld, B.A., LL.B., Vice President for Administration Farhad Kazemi, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice Provost for Global Affairs Cheryl Mills, B.A., J.D., Counselor for Operations Harold T. Read, B.S., M.B.A., Vice President for Finance Mary Sansalone, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President for Planning; Vice Provost for Academic Initiatives Jeannemarie Smith, B.A., M.B.A., Vice President for Fiscal Affairs Richard Stanley, B.A., Executive Vice Provost Sharon L. Weinberg, A.B., Ph.D., Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs

DEANS Michael C. Alfano, D.M.D., Ph.D., Dean, College of Dentistry Jo Ivey Boufford, B.A., M.D., Dean, Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service Mary Schmidt Campbell, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.; hon.: D.F.A., Ph.D., Dean, Tisch School of the Arts Mary J. Carruthers, B.A., Ph.D., Dean for Humanities, Faculty of Arts and Science Frederick D. S. Choi, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Dean, Undergraduate College; Vice Dean, Leonard N. Stern School of Business

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

George Daly, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean, Leonard N. Stern School of Business George W. Downs, B.A., Ph.D., Dean for Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Science Suzanne England, B.S., M.S.W., Ph.D., M.B.A., Dean, Shirley M. Ehrenkranz School of Social Work David F. Finney, B.A., M.A., Ed.D., Dean, School of Continuing and Professional Studies Richard Foley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science Robert M. Glickman, B.A., M.D., Saul J. Farber Dean, New York University School of Medicine and Post-Graduate Medical School Nathan Kase, M.D., Interim Dean, Mount Sinai School of Medicine (affiliated) Peter Lennie, B.Sc. [Hull], Ph.D. [Cantab.], Dean for Science, Faculty of Arts and Science Carol A. Mandel, B.A., M.A., M.S.L.S., Dean of Libraries Ann Marcus, B.A.; M.Sc. [London], Ed.D., Dean, The Steinhardt School of Education Richard L. Revesz, B.S.E, M.S., J.D., Dean, School of Law Matthew S. Santirocco, B.A.; M.A. [Cantab.], M.Phil., Ph.D., Dean, College of Arts and Science Catharine R. Stimpson, B.A.; B.A., M.A. [Cantab.], Ph.D.; hon.: D.H.L., Hum.D., Litt.D., LL.D., Dean, Graduate School of Arts and Science E. Frances White, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Martin Lipton, B.S. in Econ., LL.B., Chair Diane Belfer Marc H. Bell, B.S., M.S. William R. Berkley, B.S., M.B.A. Richard A. Bernstein, B.A. Edward H. Bersoff, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. Ronald E. Blaylock, B.S., M.B.A. Mrs. Elmer H. Bobst, B.A., M.A., M.P.H.; hon.: L.H.D. Leonard Boxer, B.S., LL.B. John Brademas (President Emeritus), B.A.; D.Phil. [Oxon.]; hon.: L.H.D., Litt.D., LL.D. Kevin R. Brine, B.A., M.B.A. Arthur L. Carter, B.A., M.B.A. Barry Diller Betty Weinberg Ellerin, B.A., J.D. Mary C. Farrell, B.A., M.B.A. Laurence D. Fink, B.A., M.B.A. Paul E. Francis, B.A., J.D. Paul J. Fribourg, B.A. Jay M. Furman, B.S., J.D.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • 9

Eric J. Gleacher, B.A., M.B.A. Norman Goodman, B.A., J.D. Richard A. Grasso, hon.: D.C.S., LL.D. Alan C. Greenberg, B.A. H. Dale Hemmerdinger, B.A. Richard D. Katcher, B.A., LL.B. Henry Kaufman, B.A., M.S., Ph.D.; hon.: L.H.D., LL.D. Richard Jay Kogan, B.A., M.B.A. Kenneth G. Langone, B.A., M.B.A. Brooke Garber Neidich, B.A. L. Jay Oliva (President Emeritus), B.A., M.A., Ph.D.; hon.: D.H.L., Litt.D., LL.D., Ph.D. Herbert M. Paul, B.B.A., M.B.A., J.D., LL.M. Lester Pollack, B.S., LL.B. Michael J. Rosenberg, B.A., M.B.A. Robert Rosenkranz, B.A., J.D. E. John Rosenwald, Jr., B.A., M.B.A. Baron Edouard de Rothschild, M.B.A. John E. Sexton, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., J.D. Henry R. Silverman, B.A., J.D.

Larry A. Silverstein, B.A., LL.B. Joel E. Smilow, B.A., M.B.A. Sheldon H. Solow Jay Stein Joseph S. Steinberg, B.A., M.B.A. Michael H. Steinhardt, B.S. Henry Taub, B.S. Laurence A. Tisch, B.S., M.B.A. Preston Robert Tisch, B.A. Lillian Vernon John L. Vogelstein Anthony Welters, B.A., J.D. Leonard A. Wilf, B.A., J.D., M.S. LL.M. (in Taxation) Robert F. Wright, B.A., M.B.A. Martin J. Wygod, B.S. William D. Zabel, B.A., LL.B. Mortimer B. Zuckerman, B.A., M.B.A., LL.B., LL.M.

LIFE TRUSTEES Mrs. W. Vincent Astor, hon.: LL.D.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Geraldine H. Coles John J. Creedon, B.S., LL.B., LL.M. Lewis L. Glucksman, B.A., M.B.A. Maurice R. Greenberg, LL.B.; hon.: J.D., LL.D. George H. Heyman, Jr., B.B.A., M.B.A. Helen L. Kimmel, B.A. George A. Murphy, B.A., M.B.A., LL.B. Thomas S. Murphy, B.S.M.E., M.B.A. William R. Salomon Marie Schwartz Herbert R. Silverman, B.S., J.D. Phyllis Cerf Wagner Baroness Mariuccia Zerilli-Marimò

TRUSTEE ASSOCIATES Bruce Berger, B.S. Jane Eisner Bram, B.A., M.S.W., Ph.D. Boris Kostelanetz, B.C.S., B.S., J.D. Marvin Leffler, B.S., M.B.A. Stanley C. Lesser, B.A., J.D.

10 • New York University • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

An Introduction to The Steinhardt School of Education

DEDICATED TO THE STUDY OF EDUCATION, HEALTH, NURSING, COMMUNICATIONS, AND THE ARTS

The Steinhardt School of Education, dedicated to the study of education, health, nursing, communications, and the arts, is one of the oldest and largest schools in the nation dedicated to the human services professions; it offers both undergraduate and graduate programs. Located in Greenwich Village, one of the most picturesque areas of New York City, the school’s undergraduate division offers the advantages of a medium-sized college and the vast resources of a major research university. For these reasons, whatever your career choice, the faculty and resources of The Steinhardt School of Education provide you with the knowledge and practical education necessary to meet the challenges of your chosen profession. From its beginning more than 110 years ago, The Steinhardt School of Education has kept pace with the changing world. When the school was established in 1890 as the School of Pedagogy, it was the first university graduate school in the nation dedicated to elevating teachers to the same professional status as physicians and lawyers. Today you can choose from over 70 undergraduate and graduate professional programs in education, applied psychology, health, nursing, communications, and the arts.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • 11

In the field of education, The Steinhardt School of Education offers some of the most progressive undergraduate programs in the country. Dedicated to community service and urban improvement, our programs stress the liberal arts preparation essential for all teachers in elementary and secondary education. Specialized courses and supervised classroom observation, student teaching, internships, and fieldwork provide students with the skills necessary to become effective educators and leaders in their profession. The Steinhardt School of Education’s programs in nursing, nutrition and food studies, and speech pathology prepare you to play an important role in these fields, where the need for professionals has increased dramatically in the past decade. As an undergraduate, the required liberal arts component of our health professions programs provides you with the analytical and organizational skills necessary for your career. Internships at New York City’s hospitals, health care agencies, social service agencies, schools, community centers, and restaurants complement your classroom learning with practical hands-on experience in the field. The Steinhardt School of Education’s program in communication studies prepares you for a career in education, the health services, private industry, the media, or government service. Depending on the concentration you choose, course work may be broadly interdisciplinary, with courses in diverse departments of the school as well as in other schools within the University, or highly specialized and offering focused study in one area. All course work is augmented by internships and field placements in New York City, the communications capital of the world. The Steinhardt School of Education offers programs in the arts to help you reach your career goals. Our programs in studio art, music, and educational theatre encourage you to give full expression to your talents as you develop the skills necessary for success as an arts educator, studio artist, or musician involved in performance, music business, or music technology.

Administration and Staff of the School (2002-2003) ADMINISTRATION Ann L. Marcus, B.A.; M.Sc. [London], Ed.D., Dean Thomas James, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice Dean LaRue Allen, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Patricia M. Carey, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs W. Gabriel Carras, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs Joseph Giovannelli, B.A., M.A., Associate Dean for Administration and Finance Lawrence Siegel, B.S., M.B.A., J.D., Assistant Dean for External Affairs Lindsay Wright, B.S., Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Planning Lee Frissell, B.A., M.A., Director of Field Projects Charles Sprague, B.A., Director of Research Development STAFF William Bolding, B.A., M.R.C.P., M.A., Ed.D., Director of Counseling and Student Services Stanislaus Greidus, B.A., M.A., Director of Enrollment Management Suzanne Hall, B.A., Director of Alumni Relations Helen J. Kelly, B.A., M.A., Director of Special Programs David A. Zapotocky, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. Director of Registration Services Nichole Scrofani, B.A., Senior Assistant Director of Admissions (The Steinhardt School of Education—Undergraduate)

Special Programs and Centers In addition to regular academic programs, several special programs and centers exist within the University and in The Steinhardt School of Education dealing with specific related areas of concern and with matters of common interest to professionals in all of the fields. These have often been cited for their excellence. STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS Qualified, upper-level undergraduates may participate in the many graduate courses in education, health, and the arts that are offered each summer in more than 12 overseas locations. The Study Abroad Programs are designed to promote both the student’s intellectual growth and the capacity for cross-cultural understanding. Each program aims to increase the student’s under-

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

standing of a foreign culture as well as content mastery from a new perspective. Programs are offered in several foreign countries with some courses required to be taken at the Washington Square Center. For additional information, consult Helen J. Kelly, Director of Special Programs, Office of Program Development, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, 82 Washington Square East, Room 62, New York, NY 10003-6680; telephone: (212) 998-5090. CENTER FOR CAREER ADVANCEMENT The Center for Career Advancement develops and supports continuing education experiences for the variety of professions served by The Steinhardt School of Education. The center, utilizing the school’s extensive faculty resources, offers a variety of experiences designed to assist the professional in keeping abreast of the recent knowledge and skill development in a particular field. Programs are presented during the year in a variety of settings, including seminars, conferences, and extended institutes. For information on upcoming conferences, consult Helen J. Kelly, Director of Special Programs, Office of Program Development, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, Pless Hall, 82 Washington Square East, Room 62, New York, NY 10003-6680; telephone: (212) 998-5090. INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATION AND SOCIAL POLICY In this era of intense challenge to the theory and practice of public education, the Institute for Education and Social Policy believes American public education must contribute to social justice and must build capacity for effective participation in democratic institutions. Our work— research and technical assistance—informs and supports policy makers, educators, parents, and community groups in their efforts to improve urban schools in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color because, although these schools have traditionally failed to educate students, we believe the students and their schools can succeed. Current projects include the following: • a cluster of local and national studies aimed at understanding charter school reform, particularly as it affects the opportunities to learn available to urban students; • evaluation of the Annenberg Challenge Grant project of the New York Networks for School Renewal; • research using the New York City Board of Education’s School-Based Expenditure Report data to analyze the relationships between resource investment patterns and student outcomes;

12 • New York University • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

• evaluation of the New York City Board of Education’s Performance Driven Budgeting Initiative; • technical assistance and training programs for two dozen local community organizations engaged in school improvement efforts; • technical assistance to community-based organizations in other urban areas involved with the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Rebuilding Communities Initiative; and • research support for the Alliance for Quality Education’s statewide efforts to build constituency support for increased state funding for public education. Recently completed projects include the following: • a study, based on graduation rates, of the costeffectiveness of small high schools; • a policy paper, Focus on Learning, that recommended improvements for special and general education in New York City and has contributed to the state’s, city’s, and federal government’s efforts to reform New York City special education; • Hard Lessons: Public Schools and Privatization, a study of public school privatization efforts; and • analyses of the state’s Schools Under Registration Review (SURR) process, through which the state identifies and assists low-performing schools. The institute was founded in 1994 by Norm Fruchter, director; Robert Berne, vice president for academic and health affairs; and Ann Marcus, dean of The Steinhardt School of Education. The institute is located at 726 Broadway, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10003-9580. For information, contact the institute at the above address, call (212) 998-5880, or e-mail us at [emailprotected] Our Web site is www.nyu.edu/iesp. METRO CENTER The Metropolitan Center for Urban Education, founded in 1978 by Professor LaMar P. Miller, addresses educational problems that are national in scope but are brought into sharp focus in large urban areas. The mission of the Metro Center is to promote an understanding of, and provide services and assistance to, underserved populations and the educational, government, and community agencies that serve them, which will result in ensuring equity and achieving excellence in the educational experiences of chil-

dren and youth. The center provides services to school districts throughout the region, particularly to New York City and tristate public schools, by providing leadership and direction aimed at identifying, analyzing, and finding solutions to urban problems, especially those that affect minorities and women. The thrust of the center’s programs is services to schools, services to student teachers, research, and evaluation. The most extensive program of the center is the New York Technical Assistance Center (NYTAC), which is one of 15 comprehensive centers across the country created by the U.S. Department of Education. The NYTAC assists the New York State Education Department and local school districts in building their capacity to ensure that all students meet high standards of performance and achievement. The center also operates the Equity Assistance Center (EAC) for Federal Region B (New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands). Issues of race, human relations, and conflicts that have plagued our schools are the focus of this program. The EAC, with sites at Baruch College of the City University of New York and Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, provides assistance to school districts on race, gender, and national origin desegregation problems. The Metro Center also conducts the Upward Bound Program for New York City high school students with physical disabilities. The object of this program is to prepare students for entrance and success in postsecondary institutions. The center conducts four school partnership programs in targeted New York City high schools. The dropout prevention program features mentoring for individual pupils by New York University graduate students. The center has also mounted a major initiative on safe and drug-free schools through three projects. The first is a data collection project designed to develop a systemwide approach for the New York City public school system and align activities related to youth drug and violence data. The second is Resilient School and Community: Safe and Drug Free, designed to provide a multifaceted response to the mandate of encouraging communities to act together to combat the growing epidemic of violence and illegal drug use. The third is the School Violence Project, designed to address methods and activities to reduce and prevent violence in schools, examine the existing body of knowledge concerning the causes and conditions of school violence, and apply this knowledge to methods and activities that reduce and prevent violence in New York City inner-city high schools.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Additionally, two new projects at the center focus on the extension of the school day: the first is the 21st-century literacy plus program at IS 143 and IS 275 in Community School District 5 in Harlem, which provides tutoring and other services to students after school. The second is TASC, The After-School Corporation project at PS 123 in Harlem, which provides opportunities for 300 students from 3 to 6 p.m. after school. The recruitment and training of minorities and women in mathematics and science education are the focus of the Teacher Opportunity Program. The center also provides opportunities for a large number of graduate students who serve as graduate tutors in New York City public schools. For further information, consult Professor LaMar P. Miller, Executive Director, Metropolitan Center for Urban Education, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, Pless Hall, 82 Washington Square East, Room 72, New York, NY 10003-6680; telephone: (212) 998-5100; Web: www.nyu.edu/education/metrocenter; E-mail: [emailprotected] PLESS CENTER FOR NURSING RESEARCH The Muriel & Virginia Pless Center for Nursing Research was founded in 1995, in partnership with the Division of Nursing and the Mount Sinai-NYU Medical Center and Health System Department of Nursing. The Center for Nursing Research provides the professional and technical resources to promote research conducted by faculty, practitioners, and nursing students of the NYU community. The center regularly reviews and refines its services, responding to the needs of the NYU nursing research community. Forums and annual scientific meetings (local, regional, and international) are sponsored by the center and provide rich intellectual exchange and research development. Opportunities for conferral with senior research faculty, guest lecturers, and visiting professors are available across an array of nursing scholarship areas. The center has stateof-the-art computing facilities, data management expertise, and statistical consultation services. The annual Pilot Grant Program, created to assist nurse researchers in the development of their programs of research, funds research awards each spring. Doctoral Fellowships for nursing students who wish to apply to work with research faculty are competed for annually. For further information, you may contact Professor Linda Mayberry at [emailprotected]

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

AREAS OF INTEREST

Applied Psychological Studies

20

24

30

38

30

42 46

❏ ❏

Communication Studies

PA G E

Art (Studio) Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education

ART AN ISTIC DP ERF EXPRE OR MA SSION NC E WR I T T CO E N MM UN AND V ICA TIO ERBAL NS TEC MA HNO L N AD AGE OGY, MIN ME IST NT, A RAT N ION D PU BLI SER C AN VIC E/E D NON DU CAT PROF ION IT MU MU LTILIN LTI CU GUAL LTU , RAL STU TEA DIE WI CHIN S TH G STU LAN SP GU EECH DEN AG E D AND TS ISO RD FO ERS RM SEE OR PAG E IN E IN FOR DIC MAT ATE ION D ,

TEA CH ING

Guide to Areas of Interest and Study

HE A HU LTH, N MA N S URSI ERV NG ICE , AN D S CO UN PSY S CH ELING OL OG AND Y

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • 13

Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education

Educational Theatre

English Education

Foreign Language Education

Mathematics Education

54

Music Business Music Education

50

❏ ❏

Music Performance or Composition

Music Technology

Nursing

Nutrition and Food Studies

58

58

58 58

❏ ❏

68

76

Science Education

82

Social Studies Education

88

Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

92

University, School, and Alumni Award Recipients for Teaching THE STEINHARDT SCHOOL OF EDUCATION TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARD FOR FULL-TIME FACULTY 1980

1986

1992

1998

Henry Perkinson

Martin Hamburger

Constantine Georgiou

Lawrence Balter

1981

1987

1993

1999

Norma Thompson

Gilbert Trachtman

Charles Hayes

Joyce Hauser

1982

1988

1994

2000

Robert Berlin

Robert Wasson

Arnold Grossman

Constantine Georgiou Frank Tang Diana Turk

1983

1989

1995

John Phillips

Claudette Lefebvre

Kenneth Goldberg

1984

1990

1996

2001

Laura Brittain

Michael Bronner

Carol Noll Hoskins

Deborah Borisoff Miriam Eisenstein-Ebsworth Catherine Tamis-LeMonda

1985

1991

1997

Nancy Esibill

Christine Nystrom

Bridget N. O’Connor

ALUMNI GREAT TEACHER AWARD 1959

1970

1976

1990

Alonzo F. Myers

Ethel J. Alpenfels

Elazar J. Pedhazer

Beverly K. Bain

1962

1971

1978

1993

Louis E. Raths

H. Harry Giles

Janice L. Gorn

Richard R. Ellis

1963

1972

1979

1994

Beatrice J. Hurley

Louise M. Rosenblatt

Robert S. Berlin

Arnold Goren

1965

1973

1985

Samuel P. McCutchen

Henrietta J. Fleck

Frances W. Aronoff

1966

1975

1988

Hale A. Woodruff

Karen Gillespie

Padmaker M. Sapre

THE STEINHARDT SCHOOL OF EDUCATION TEACHING EXCELLENCE AWARD FOR ADJUNCT FACULTY 2000

Dan Hahn Jennifer Meyer Rebecca Packer

2001

Judy Lief-Recalde Gisella McSweeney Manos Pantelidis

UNIVERSITY DISTINGUISHED TEACHING MEDAL 1988

1999

Neil Postman

John Mayher

1991

2001

Henry Perkinson

Joseph Giacquinta

1994

Lenore H. Ringler

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • 15

Degree Programs Program Description

Page

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.)

Program Description

Page

Dance Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

Teaching Students with Speech and Language Disabilities, All Grades* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Health-Related Programs

Educational Theatre, All Grades*. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Applied Psychological Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Arts and Arts Education Programs

Music Teacher, All Grades*. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 with areas of concentration in Instrumental Music Piano Vocal Music Studio Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Communication Programs Communication Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 with areas of concentration in Communication Media and Technology Graphic Communications Management and Technology Mass Media and Communication Speech and Interpersonal Communication Teacher Certification Programs

Nursing† . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 with an area of concentration for Students with a baccalaureate in another field Nutrition and Food Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 with areas of concentration in Nutrition and Dietetics Food and Restaurant Management Food Studies Teaching Students with Speech and Language Disabilities, All Grades* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

(B.S./M.A.) DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS IN NURSING Adv. Practice Nursing: Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner . . . . . . . . 68

Biology, 7-12* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Adv. Practice Nursing: Adult Primary Care Nurse Practitioner . . . . . . 68

Chemistry, 7-12* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Adv. Practice Nursing: Geriatrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education* . . . . . . . . . 30

Adv. Practice: Holistic Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education* . . 30

Adv. Practice Nursing: Mental Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Earth Science, 7-12* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Adv. Practice Nursing: Palliative Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Educational Theatre, All Grades*. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Adv. Practice Nursing: Pediatrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

English, 7-12* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Nursing Informatics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Foreign Language Education: Teacher 7-12* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Chinese French German Hebrew Italian Japanese Latin Russian Spanish

Teaching of Nursing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Mathematics, 7-12* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Music Education, All Grades* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Physics, 7-12* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Social Studies, 7-12* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Teacher Education Minor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Nursing Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Nurse Midwifery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

BACHELOR OF MUSIC (B.MUS.) Music Performance or Composition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 with areas of concentration in Instrumental Piano Theory and Composition Voice Music Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Music Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 *Leads to provisional/initial teacher certification. †Professional license qualifying.

16 • New York University • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • 17

NYU Teacher Education

Mathematics Education • Science Education: Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics English and Foreign Language Education • Childhood, Early Childhood, and Special Education • Music Education Social Studies Education • Teachers of Students with Speech and Language Disorders SKILLS FOR THE PRESENT, VISION FOR THE PRESENT AND THE FUTURE

The Steinhardt School of Education is committed to preparing teachers who meet the highest standards of their profession. Teachers graduating from our programs know their subjects and how to teach them. They know children and adolescents and how to help them learn. They understand the complex realities of 21st-century schooling and are prepared to succeed in helping all children grow and develop. This moral commitment to equity and social justice is accompanied by a deep commitment to excellence. The NYU teacher is a lifelong learner who will keep meeting the ever-new challenges of teaching.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

18 • New York University • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

NYU’s teacher education curricula recognize that education at the beginning of the new millennium continues to be marked by competing demands and ongoing disagreements about methods and goals. In order to prepare teachers to work effectively in this exciting but difficult environment, we have designed our teacher education curricula to ensure that each of our graduates will have the understandings and the skills they will need to succeed. In order to do so, we do not hide from the hard issues facing teachers: we embrace them so that they can be understood. NYU teachers are the embodiment of self-renewing people who develop throughout their career in collaboration with, and as an influence on, a growing circle of colleagues. NYU teachers are encouraged to work adeptly with change by understanding it as an intrinsic element of their personal and professional lives. NYU teachers have continually displayed their ability to remain committed to working in the dynamic environment of the classroom. One of the central features of the new NYU teacher education curricula is that they are strongly rooted in the schools. From the first semester of the first year of study at NYU, all future teachers will be observing and gradually participating in the processes of teaching and learning with children and adolescents. Whether students are studying learning theory or curriculum or methods, the questions asked and the issues posed will derive from and in turn be tested in the crucible of practice. The extent and duration of these field experiences will gradually increase, climaxing in at least two full-fledged student teaching experiences in two different schools during the senior year. In order to develop all of the competencies and understandings necessary to be a professional teacher, NYU’s teacher education curricula embody both shared learning experiences and those tailored for each particular curriculum. In addition to the professional education curricula, each undergraduate program requires that all students take approximately half of their program of study in liberal arts to ensure a broadbased understanding of those arts and sciences. The general liberal arts requirements, embodied in the Morse Academic Plan, are described on page 102. With some minor modifications (depending on the level and subject of certification sought), the undergraduate curricula share the same pedagogical core. This set of learning experiences provides future teachers with a deep understanding of learners and learning, knowledge and

knowing, teachers and teaching, and schools and schooling grounded in practice so that students will be able to enact their understandings after they graduate. The pedagogical core is completed by study in the subject or subjects that students will teach and by specific curriculum and methods courses dedicated to each of the certification levels and subject matters.

PEDAGOGICAL CORE Year One: In the first semester each new teacher education student takes a special section of the New Student Seminar designed to introduce students both to NYU and to the profession they have chosen. Students visit several different schools to get a picture of the variety available. In the second semester, students engage in exploring their own learning histories and placing them in the contexts of schooling in the challenging Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. This course is the keystone of our efforts to help make NYU teachers into the thoughtful, reflective professionals they must become if they are to succeed in contemporary schools. A particular focus of this course is the acquisition and development of language in its social context and its implications for all teachers of all subjects. In addition to on-campus study, this course involves visiting a school and observing the teaching and learning practices within it. Year Two: This year is devoted to understanding the processes of human growth and development both in and out of the school. In Human Development, each participant develops a broad understanding of how humans grow from conception to death in psychological terms, including how we learn, how our minds work, how our bodies influence our minds, and how development is influenced by the family, school, and work environments we live it. The second semester involves a choice of two Educational Development modules. Each module focuses of one of the four developmental levels that students can be certified to teach—early childhood, childhood, middle childhood/early adolescence, and adolescence. The focus is on understanding the particular characteristics of kids at the developmental levels students have chosen. The modules share a commitment to exploring and understanding the wide range of human development at all ages from a multicultural as well as a learning point of view. Both semesters include field experiences, mostly in nonschool settings accompanying human development, and in appropriate school settings in the second semester.

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Year Three: The core experiences during this year and the next begin to interact more specifically with the particular requirements of the specialization students chose in terms of level and subject or subjects to be taught. Both of the curricula that prepare people to work with younger children have as a mission that all of our graduates in early childhood and childhood education will be prepared to teach special education children as well as general education kids. This manifests itself in an integrated set of learning experiences for each level that looks at language and literacy developments, content (e.g., mathematics, social studies, science, the arts), curriculum and instruction for all children, and the legal and theoretical foundations of special education. These experiences are closely tied to an increasingly intense set of field experiences in a variety of schools and classrooms. Most students intending to teach at all levels also take Education as a Social Institution, which involves students in seeing how schooling is structured in our society. Students visit school board meetings; explore how policy is made concerning testing, tracking, and special education; and explore the worlds of schools outside the classroom. In addition to learning about using technologies in teaching their particular subjects in the appropriate curriculum and methods courses, secondary education students also take a course in Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. The language and literacy course is based on the mutually supporting premises that children who can’t read and write will have a difficult time learning the subjects of the secondary curriculum, and that reading and writing are themselves powerful learning tools across the curriculum. Year Four: The key learning experiences of the final year are the two student’s teaching placements where students make the final transition to being the teachers they’ve been preparing to be. While all experienced teachers recognize that we keep learning to teach throughout our teaching careers, the supervised student teaching experiences (with their associated seminars) provide the nurturing environments that make the successful transition from student to professional possible. Growing out of and feeding back to the student teaching experiences are instructions on campus in a variety of areas including, particularly, at all levels, courses on the adaptation of instruction for special education students in mainstream classrooms. Building on the language and literacy course of the previous year as well as the

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • 19

development courses, students develop appropriate strategies for working with all the children in their classes. The final course of the pedagogical core is Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II, which functions both as a summation of what has been learned about teaching and a look ahead to the professional practice that will be embarked on after graduation. This course helps students further develop their competence as a reflective practitioner who can learn from their teaching to become better at it throughout their careers.

OUR PROGRAM, OUR FACULTY, AND YOU The NYU teacher education faculty is committed to making the professional preparation an intellectually exciting and personally rewarding experience. We believe that teachers can have an enormous impact on the future and, even though the job is difficult and the support is not always what it should be, we know that NYU teachers continue to have a powerful impact on the worlds and lives of children and adolescents. We welcome students to the quest. Our programs reveal a sense that NYU teacher education graduates will be the stars of the teaching profession in the future, and that to

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earn the star status, they will have to understand all of the tensions embodied in the lines that make up the star. For example, to take one of the lines, an NYU teacher will understand that effective teaching depends on both knowing the content one teaches and how to teach it (pedagogy), and that knowing and doing are inseparable in this interaction. Or, to take another line, NYU teachers will be prepared to teach in the real world of schools (what is) while all the time striving toward what it might be. They can do both because they have explored the context of real schools and how their own autobiographical learning history enhances and constrains their teaching practice in such schools.

20 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Applied Psychological Studies

EXPLORING CAREERS IN HUMAN SERVICES

A PORTFOLIO OF EXPERIENCE BUILT ON A STRONG ACADEMIC BASE

The Bachelor of Science Program in Applied Psychological Studies is designed to provide you with learning experiences in various human services fields—such as counseling, health, or social work— before you choose a career. It provides you with an understanding of the different types of work and settings within the human services professions and the many ways in which psychology and counseling skills are used. This broad-based program in the Department of Applied Psychology offers the academic foundation essential to all human services professions—a strong liberal arts background designed to develop your critical understanding of human nature. You study psychology, sociology, natural sciences, language, culture, and history. Equally important, the program offers you the opportunity for continuous career exploration in different fieldwork settings. You build a portfolio of valuable experience that will help you in seeking an entry-level position or in continuing on for graduate study.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Applied Psychological Studies • 21

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

A Diverse Group of Students with Common Goals The program attracts transfer students from community colleges, four-year colleges, and the NYU community. Students transfer into the program at the beginning of their junior year in college. Our students are committed to working closely with others, whether they be children, adolescents, adults, or the elderly. They want to choose the field of work best suited to their interests. They enjoy psychology and want to learn more about personality, behavior, and human development. And, they are drawn to the challenge of helping people cope with the problems they may face in daily life, ranging from physical disabilities and emotional disorders to family violence, unemployment, and substance abuse.

Classroom Study The program offers courses in psychology, sociology, counseling, and research that integrate theory and the practical experience gained in fieldwork. You examine the needs of specific populations and take electives that focus on your specific interests, such as health education, conflict resolution, special education, and many others.

Distinguished Faculty Many of our faculty of the Department of Applied Psychology work closely with undergraduates. Professor Gigliana Melzi, director of undergraduate studies, brings a strong interest in the ways preschool

children in different cultures interact with their parents to acquire language. Professor Lisa Suzuki studies multiculturalism as well as intelligence testing and helps prepare students to work among diverse populations. The research of Professor Perry Halkitis focuses on high-risk sexual behaviors and gay and HIV identities. Professor Niobe Way examines the lives and friendships of lowincome urban adolescents and is an active faculty adviser to the University Neighborhood High School on New York’s Lower East Side.

Fieldwork: A Major Component You have extensive practical fieldwork throughout your junior and senior years, including the summers if you wish. Together with your program adviser and fieldsite coordinator, you choose field placements from among social service and community agencies, hospitals, community health centers, career counseling agencies, and schools. You learn about each organization, how different types of professionals work together as teams, their approaches to client service, and the specific community needs and problems that each organization tries to address. In your junior year of fieldwork, you concentrate on key issues and concerns within the human service professions, develop a fundamental knowledge of psychology, and learn basic skills of individual and group process. You visit a variety of agencies and schools, observe and inter(Continued on page 22.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

M

ost human services fields require continuing study beyond the baccalaureate level.This program prepares you for graduate study in a specific field or for employment in the human services. With your portfolio of experience gained through the program, you can apply for immediate entry-level employment in, for example, government service, childhood education centers, or community agencies, perhaps combining work and graduate study. If you choose to continue your studies after graduation, many fields, including the following, are open to you: • Guidance counseling in schools • Outplacement and career counseling in business and industry • Family counseling • Counseling those with disabilities • Rehabilitation and therapies: art, music, drama, dance, speech, occupational therapy, and therapeutic recreation • Special education • Health education and nutrition • Human sexuality • Social work • Graduate work in, for example, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and urban studies

“This program enabled me to explore my career interests in counseling.The hands-on experience I gained through internships and fieldwork made me positive of my goals, while my academic studies provided the foundation I needed for graduate school.” SUMI KIM

22 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in applied psychological studies is designed for juniors and seniors who have completed the equivalent of 60 points in liberal arts courses. A typical program of study for the freshman and sophomore years is outlined to the right. While in the program, students take 15 points in core psychology courses covering personality, developmental, social, and learning theories. Students also must take 6 points in counseling, 7 points in sociology, and 11 points in research skills. In addition, students gain valuable learning experiences from taking 15 points in extensive on-site fieldwork placements ranging from hospitals and social service agencies to schools and career counseling centers. Students also take 12 points in restricted electives by advisement. Gigliana Melzi Program Director (212) 998-9023 Department of Applied Psychology The Steinhardt School of Education New York University East Building, Suite 400 239 Greene Street New York, NY 10003-6674

APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES Freshman Year

32 Points

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

32 Points

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

Liberal Arts Requirement

4

Speech Communication. E21.0033

4

Introduction to Psychology. V89.0001

4

Liberal Arts Requirement: Foreign Language

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science I. V55.02••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

MAJOR New Student Seminar. E03.0001

TOTAL

16

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06•• 4

TOTAL

Spring Semester LIBERAL ARTS

Spring Semester LIBERAL ARTS The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Introduction to Sociology. V93.0001

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Quantitative Reasoning. V55.01••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

TOTAL

16

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Culture. V55.07••

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science II. V55.03••

4

Developmental Psychology. E63.1271

3

Basic Statistics I. E10.1085

3

Unrestricted Electives

2

TOTAL

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

(Continued from page 21.) view staff, sit in on case conferences, participate in student advisory groups, discuss professional ethics, and explore career alternatives. In your senior year, you choose one setting for your fieldsite placement. You may do intake interviews at a community youth agency, serve as a mentor in a public school setting, observe group process in an outpatient hospital setting, or work on a faculty research project.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

16

Fieldsite Groups/Career Exploration You have an opportunity to discuss your fieldwork experiences in groups each week. These groups provide you with an opportunity to assess your fieldwork, explore your career choices, and start the process of seeking a position after graduation or applying for graduate school.

16

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Applied Psychological Studies • 23

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Junior Year

32 Points

Senior Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

MAJOR

MAJOR

32 Points

Fieldwork Orientation I. E63.1123

3

Fieldwork Practice III. E63.1125

4

Counseling Interview. E63.1012

3

Group Dynamics. E63.1620

3

Personality Development. E63.1039

3

Writing in Social Sciences. E11.1191

2

Psychology of Human Learning. E63.1214

3

Psychological Measurement. E63.1137

3

Restricted Elective

3

Restricted Elective

3

TOTAL

15

TOTAL

Spring Semester

Spring Semester

MAJOR

MAJOR

15

Fieldwork Observation II. E63.1124

4

Fieldwork Research IV. E63.1126

4

Research and Evaluation. E63.1073

3

Mental Health. E63.1031

4

Social Psychology. E63.1003

3

Abnormal Psychology. E63.1038

3

Diversity and Professional Life. E66.1011

4

Sociology of Urban Life. E20.1045

3

Restricted Elective

3

Restricted Elective

3

TOTAL

17

TOTAL

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

17

24 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Art

PREPARING ARTISTS AND EDUCATORS TO SHAPE A NEW CENTURY

Now more than ever, images have become a site where truth is contested and social space is defined. Boundaries between media are being challenged, as handmade marks and objects merge with computer screens and virtual realities. In the Department of Art and Art Professions, we mix the rich visual traditions of the past with emerging forms and ideas, encouraging students to envision fresh new ways of making art. Balancing cutting-edge technical training against a backdrop of aesthetic approaches ranging from classical painting to mixed media and multicultural theory, NYU immerses students directly in the issues confronting the art world itself. Here, the vast resources of a renowned University combine with an outstanding art faculty to prepare students for careers in the real-time art world in ways that far exceed the scope of more narrowly defined programs. By combining critical thinking with a broad range of formal skills, we enable our graduates not only to keep pace with change, but to instigate it.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Art • 25

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Study in the Center of the International Art World New York City is the central laboratory for the research and development of urban art and culture. Leading artists live, work, and teach here alongside the most influential galleries and museums in the world. NYU’s campus, located in the heart of this vibrant community, allows you to participate in the excitement of important exhibitions, performances, lectures, and events as they happen. Through internships, you work with experienced professionals in a wide variety of disciplines. In the classroom, you study with acclaimed artists and educators, all of whom continue to practice in the field. Whether you are creating public sculpture with a faculty member just back from Europe or participating in an internship at a SoHo gallery, your education here will be like no other.

Artists and the Liberal Arts Images define our world, and because artists, as the creators of images, participate in the invention of visual history, it is essential that they have a rich and diverse educational background. As you learn to give form to the imagination of your time, NYU has the resources to help you discover and interpret the meaning within your work. Core courses in the liberal arts provide you with a broad base of knowledge in the humanities, sciences, and social science, stressing an interdisciplinary approach that complements your major. This understanding will strengthen your artistic insight as well as your ability to think critically within a diverse and challenging social context. You are prepared with the skills and confidence to succeed in the exciting and highly competitive global art world.

Distinguished Faculty

STUDIO ART

Faculty members in the Department of Art and Art Professions have deep ties to the New York art community, as well as strong national and international reputations. Working closely with undergraduates is Professor Nancy Barton, director of the undergraduate art program and a practicing artist whose works have been exhibited internationally in galleries as diverse and prestigious as the Museum of Modern Art, the Long Beach Museum, and the Shoshana Wayne Gallery. Professor Jack Risley is a renowned sculptor with numerous shows in New York, Boston, and Cologne, Germany. He is also the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Grant, a Tiffany Foundation Award, and the Rome Prize. Professor John Torreano is a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, with showings of his paintings and sculptures at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and the Corcoran Gallery in Washington.

You are prepared to produce your own artwork while finding employment as a gallery or studio assistant, researcher or archivist, designer for the Internet, photo lab technician, designer, model maker, ceramist, or media production assistant, as well as a myriad of other entry-level positions in museums, auction houses, community centers, publications, nonprofit public and private arts organizations, arts-related businesses, and independent artist studios.

Program in Studio Art Pursuing a career in the arts is an exhilarating and challenging endeavor. Rules in the art world are largely made to be broken, and the curriculum that best prepares young artists to succeed in this field is one that encourages innovation and selfreliance over predictable approaches. Experience with a wide range of materials and techniques allows you to express your ideas fluently. At the same time, a thorough grounding in the history and theory of art is essential to your artistic career, as it gives you the tools needed to evaluate your own work within the context of a larger culture. (Continued on page 26.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Students who are committed to furthering their education in the arts or teaching or entering a professionally related field such as art therapy or arts administration pursue appropriate graduate degree programs on completion of the bachelor’s degree in art. HELPING YOU START YOUR CAREER

Our extensive student internships give you a head start in the job market. Many interns go on to paid positions upon graduation, and others use the professional skills and contacts to pursue positions that would be inaccessible without work experience. Our outstanding faculty and the many visiting artists and critics you will meet during your studies are excellent resources for advice on entering the working world of the practicing artist. Recent graduates are employed in areas such as • Studio manager • Art director • Photo archivist • Curator for Internet gallery • Assistant gallery director • Assistant coordinator of museum education • Television production coordinator • Art teacher, public school, community center • Exhibitions designer • Fashion designer • Graphic designer • Digital designer • Internship coordinator for arts college

26 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in studio art combines 62 points of liberal arts courses with 64 required points in studio art that includes drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, crafts (ceramics, glass, jewelry), photography, computer and video art, undergraduate projects, and art history.

STUDIO ART

Students also choose 2 points of unrestricted electives in area(s) of interest.

New Student Seminar. E03.0001

Fundamentals of Drawing I. E90.0322

3

Fundamentals of Sculpture I. E90.0342

4

Nancy Barton Program Director (212) 998-5710 [emailprotected]

Fundamentals of Media I. E90.•••• (Computer Art, Photography, or Video Art)

4

Art and Contemporary Culture I. E90.0037

3

Linda Vega Student Advisement Coordinator (212) 998-5708 [emailprotected] Department of Art and Art Professions The Steinhardt School of Education New York University 34 Stuyvesant Street New York, NY 10003-7599

Please note: Minors are available in areas such as journalism, psychology, and art history. Please contact the student advisement coordinator for further information.

Freshman Year

36 points

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

MAJOR

TOTAL

30 points

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Art Since 1945. E90.1051

3

MAJOR Visual Arts: Sophomore Seminar. E90.0099

4

Studio Concentration. E90.••••

4

(optional: Studio Elective E90.••••

18

TOTAL

3)

15(18)

Spring Semester

Spring Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Liberal Arts Requirement: Introduction to Psychology. V89.0001

4 3

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

MAJOR Fundamentals of Drawing II. E90.0323

3

Contemporary Art. E90.1113

Fundamentals of Sculpture II. E90.0343

4

MAJOR

Fundamentals of Media II. E90.•••• (Computer Art, Photography, or Video Art)

4

Studio Concentration or Undergraduate Projects. E90.••••

Art and Contemporary Culture II. E90.0038

3

(optional: Studio Elective E90.••••

TOTAL

18

TOTAL

4 3)

15(18)

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

(Continued from page 25.) The school’s program begins freshman year with an ambitious series of interdisciplinary studio courses. Art history and seminar courses in the first two years expose you to a wide range of ideas and practices. In the sophomore and junior years, you mix art courses with classes in the liberal arts and sciences. You may also begin to explore your own artistic concerns through the development of an individual body of work in undergraduate projects courses, which offer studio space for mixed

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

media projects. Many students participate in internships during the junior year, and study abroad is a popular option during the spring semester. In the senior year, you take the course Art, Culture, and Society, which integrates your liberal arts studies with your artistic practice, culminating in a written thesis. You may also apply for the Senior Studio course, which includes the use of studio space and participation in a four-person exhibition in the Rosenberg Gallery.

You may also choose a minor concentration from NYU’s vast offerings, incorporating other fields such as journalism, music, psychology, literature, or anthropology into your study of art. Members of the studio faculty are drawn from New York’s worldrenowned community of artists, critics, and scholars. Special resources include NYU’s Grey Art Gallery and Study Center, the department’s 80 Washington Square East Galleries, and the Rosenberg Gallery, as well as the “Different

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Art • 27

STUDIO OPTIONS:

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Junior Year

30 points

Senior Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

32 points

Liberal Arts Requirement: Natural Science

4

Liberal Arts Requirement: Mathematics

4

Liberal Arts Elective

4

Integrating Liberal Arts: Art, Culture, and Society. E90.1995

4

MAJOR Studio Elective. E90. ••••

3

Undergraduate Projects. E90.1022

4

(optional: Internship. E90.1302

3)

TOTAL

15 (18)

Spring Semester (Study Abroad Option)

MAJOR Senior Studio. E90.1023

4

Studio Elective. E90. ••••

3

Unrestricted Elective

2

TOTAL

17

Spring Semester

LIBERAL ARTS LIBERAL ARTS

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

Liberal Arts Requirement: Foreign Language

4

Liberal Arts Elective

4

(optional: Studio Elective. E90. ••••

TOTAL

4

Liberal Arts Elective

4

MAJOR

MAJOR Studio Elective. E90. ••••

Liberal Arts Requirement: Speech Communication. E21.0033

3 3)

15 (18)

Senior Studio. E90.1023

4

Studio Elective. E90. ••••

3

(optional: Internship. E90.1302

TOTAL

3)

15 (18)

TOTAL POINTS

128

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Voices” lecture series and the city’s extraordinary wealth of museums, galleries, and artists’ studios.

Portfolio Review Admission to the Studio Art Program is by review of your artist statement and slide portfolio.

A Community of Artists Small studio classes encourage close relationships with your teachers and

peers and ensure much individual attention within the larger NYU community. Through slide lectures, gallery and museum visits, reading and writing assignments, and student presentations, you engage with the dialogues that change and define the arts. A dynamic series of public programs, including lectures, performances, panels, symposia, and video screenings, enhances knowledge gained in the classroom and studio. Visiting artists and scholars provide students with the opportunity to hear and see different

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

points of view about concept development, art-making practice, and career building, in both classroom and critique settings. Recent visitors have included Marina Abramovic, Vito Acconci, Beth B, Matthew Barney, Ross Bleckner, Jennifer Bolande, Sawad Brooks, Gavin Brown, Dan Cameron, Lynne Cooke, Ann Craven, Douglas Crimp, Karen Davie, Jacques Derrida, Jane Dickson, Ricardo Dominguez, Mary Beth Edelson, Okwui Enwezor, Jack Featherly, Teresita Fernandez, Hal (Continued on page 28.)

Students in the Studio Art Program pursue a Bachelor of Science degree and can specialize in painting and drawing, sculpture, printmaking, video, crafts (ceramics, glass, jewelry), computer art, or photography. Minor: Students may also minor in another area such as art history, science, or English, to name just a few. Summer Study: Students may take advantage of NYU summer courses to accelerate their studies. Study Abroad: In the junior year, you are encouraged to enroll for one semester in one of the exciting study abroad options sponsored by New York University. Programs such as NYU in Florence, where students live at the 55-acre Villa La Pietra estate, are especially popular with studio art majors. Independent Study: Under the direction of a full-time faculty member, a student may undertake individualized research to develop one’s own style or body of work.

OTHER PROGRAM TO SEE: • Communication Studies: Graphic Communications Management and Technology

28 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

(Continued from page 27.) Foster, Lisa Gangitano, Renee Green, Jose Freire, Lyle Ashton Harris, Rachael Harrison, Amy Hauft, Dana Hoey, Junji Ito, Brad Kalhammer, Ben Kinmont, Silvia Kolbowski, Kaspar Konig, Kwok Kian Chow, Sean Landers, Yongwoo Lee, Simon Leung, Berry LeVa, Jenny Liu, Barbara London, Charles Long, Kristin Lucas, Sean Mellyn, Fumio Nanjo, Bob Nickas, Carl Ostendarp, Paul Pfeiffer,

Peggy Phelan, Lisa Phillips, Richard Phillips, Stephen Prina, Yvonne Rainer, Paul Ramirez-Jonas, Laurence Rickles, Avital Ronnell, Sheree Rose, Lisa Ruyter, Jerry Saltz, Carolee Schneeman, Mira Schor, Barry Schwabsky, Lawrence Seward, Amy Sillman, Jeanne Silverthorne, Franklin Sirmans, Kiki Smith, Mike Smith, Holly Solomon, Ann Sperry, Beth Stryker, Diana Thater, Fred Tomaselli, Pablo Vargas, Ursula Von Rydingsvard, and Lisa Yuskavage.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Fundamentals: The First Year Your immersion in a series of intensive studio courses allows you to explore many forms and philosophies of artmaking simultaneously, giving you an unusually wide array of skills and languages to express your ideas. You use traditional and nontraditional materials in a variety of projects, which range from classical figure drawing to experimental sculpture,

performance, black-and-white photography, video, and digital imaging. At the end of the first year, you are better prepared to make, observe, and analyze your own artworks and the work of others; you become more disciplined in your ability to sustain long periods of creative concentration; and you gain a much wider view of the many ways in which artists contribute to society.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Art • 29

Art History and Seminar Sequence

Senior Studio and Exhibition

Beginning with Art and Contemporary Culture I and II, and continuing with Art Since 1945 and Contemporary Art History, you will be immersed in the debates and images that have charted the course of visual culture from antiquity to current gallery exhibitions. Visual Arts (sophomore seminar) and Integrating Liberal Arts courses explore personal expression in relation to history and critical thought. These courses integrate ideas and visual practice, incorporating artist’s projects and cultural criticism on an equal basis.

You may apply for the Senior Studio course, designed to help students focus on the issues and formal strategies that they have identified as central to their work. In addition to group critiques, a senior mentor meets independently with you in your studio work space. Over the course of this year, you develop a cohesive body of work as well as a written thesis outlining the ideas and contexts that drive your creative process. In the spring, you participate in a formal exhibition in the Rosenberg Gallery.

Studio Courses The Studio Art Program offers structured course sequences in painting and drawing, sculpture, photography, art in media (computer and video art), printmaking, and craft arts (ceramics, jewelry, and glass). After your first year, you may choose to focus on one medium or to combine a wide range of disciplines.

Undergraduate Projects Courses During sophomore and junior years, you may apply to take undergraduate projects courses. The classes are conceptually driven, using the idea of praxis—the combination of theory and practice—to explore ideas by employing both visual and intellectual methods. Through readings, films, slide lectures, visiting speakers, and field trips, you explore the broader social and theoretical dimensions of visual culture. Students in these classes are given studio space to produce artwork in media of their own choice.

Study Abroad Option Students in the junior year are encouraged to enroll for one semester in one of several excellent study abroad programs sponsored by New York University or to participate in an established exchange program with one of several internationally renowned universities. Study abroad programs such as NYU in Florence, London, or Paris are especially popular with studio art majors.

Internship Opportunities in Studio Art Students can elect internships for credit by advisement through the Undergraduate Internship course, E90.1302. In this course, students are assisted in finding individualized placements with recognized artists, museums, galleries, and nonprofit or commercial businesses within the visual arts. Interns work closely with NYU faculty to assess their progress and define learning goals. A small sampling of the more than 300 internship settings available are as follows.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Artists’ Studios: Kiki Smith, Takashi Murakami, Janine Antoni, Lyle Ashton Harris, Beverly Semmes, Petah Coyne, Brad Kahlhamer, Ursula Von Rydingsvard, Lynne Yamamoto, Shirley Kanada, Peter Campus, Donald Sultan, Haim Steinbach, Jeanne Silverthorne, Lucio Pozzi, Suzanne McClelland, Lisa Yuskavage. Galleries: Brook Alexander Gallery, Threadwaxing Space, Exit Art, Franklin Furnace, Maryann Boesky Gallery, Postmasters, Rupert Goldsworthy Gallery, Nancy Hoffman Gallery, The Kitchen, Holly Solomon Gallery, Sonnabend Gallery, Jack Tilton Gallery, White Columns, Sean Kelly, Marborough Galleries. Museums: American Museum of the Moving Image, American Craft Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, MoMA, Guggenheim Museum, P.S. 1 Center of Contemporary Art, Whitney Museum of American Art. Organizations: Elle magazine, Cynthia Rowley, Betsey Johnson, Issey Miyake, Saturday Night Live, Fox Five TV, MTV, New York Department of Cultural Affairs, New-York Historical Society, Jim Hensen Productions, Disney Theatre Productions, Martha Stewart magazine, Ralph Lauren Associates, Time Warner, Inc.

Preparation for Art Education Students who are interested in teaching art in public and private schools can begin to take art education courses, by advisement, in their senior year. By taking selected art education courses, students are able to make an informed decision about pursuing teaching art as a profession. Beginning their education with a strong focus in studio art, students experience firsthand the artist’s creative process. In the undergraduate liberal arts courses, students gain an extended perspective on the world of ideas and the role that aesthetic experience plays in cultural history. Upon graduation from our undergraduate program, students who are accepted into the Master’s Degree Program in Art Education can reduce their M.A. degree requirements by a maximum of 12 points, enabling them to accelerate the completion of their graduate degree. The Master’s Degree Program in Art Education is designed to provide advanced professional training for the artist-teacher. Grounded in practice, this program draws on critical theory in art and education. Through a sequence of core courses, students examine the philosophical, political, sociological, and historical issues related to teaching art and learn to develop socially and culturally relevant art curricula. Simultaneously, students complete the requirements for teacher certification through the master’s program and can teach art from kindergarten to grade 12. Students will be prepared to teach art not only in schools, but also in museums, community-based programs, and other alternative educational sites.

30 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Childhood, Early Childhood, and Special Education

Certification Program in Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education (Grades 1 through 6) Certification Program in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education PROGRAMS COMMITTED TO TEACHING ALL CHILDREN

The Steinhardt School of Education prepares teachers who recognize the capacities, strengths, and needs of all children and their families. To meet this challenge, we have created two dual certification programs that are at the cutting edge of the profession: one in Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education and a second in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education. This design recognizes that whether our graduates choose to work in general education settings, special education settings, or inclusive settings, they need to share a set of common understandings. Thus, our students acquire a firm knowledge base in human development and variability in development. They acquire knowledge and skills for providing enriching, child-centered educational environments and learn how to adapt those environments to meet the needs of the diverse students in their classes.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Childhood, Early Childhood, and Special Education • 31

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Graduates from these dual certification programs—whether pursuing work in general or special education—share visions for their students. They acquire the collaborative skills to realize those visions with teachers, parents, and other education and health professionals. In short, NYU’s integrated, dual certification programs model the process its graduates will use throughout their careers.

Your Program Choices Upon successful completion of their programs, students may be recommended for New York State Certification in two areas: early childhood education (birth through grade 2) and early childhood special education or childhood education (grades 1 through 6) and childhood special education. The Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education Dual Certification Program description (page 32) and the Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education Dual Certification Program description (page 32) outline the educational opportunities available to you at NYU and the professional opportunities available to you after graduation and certification.

Strong Emphasis on the Liberal Arts A solid foundation in a wide range of liberal arts subjects and expertise in one area of the liberal arts are critical to your development as a firstrate teacher. With our liberal arts core and the 30-point liberal arts concentration required by New York State for teacher certification, our baccalaureate program ensures that you will receive the best possible preparation to be a teacher. For your

liberal arts concentration, you choose from such areas as history, literature, science, psychology, and from many other offerings in NYU’s College of Arts and Science. Additionally, through The Steinhardt School of Education, your knowledge of teaching children will be supported by courses about human development, educational foundations, and inquiry-based education.

Student Activities From your first year, your involvement in departmental activities will round-out your learning. You may join the Special Education Club, which is a chapter of the Council for Exceptional Children, and the Future Educators Club, which is available to all preservice students in the department. You may also take advantage of various departmental seminars and social activities concerned with the education of children. Students are also encouraged to join The Steinhardt’s School of Education’s Undergraduate Student Government.

Distinguished Faculty The faculty working in childhood, early childhood, and special education are among the country’s leading experts in their fields. Professor Frances Rust is an early childhood specialist deeply committed to improving teacher education through her studies of the beliefs of teachers and of how teachers’ skills are evaluated. Professor Chelsea Bailey examines social, political, and economic influences on child development and how children comprehend the world around them. Professors Lisa Fleisher, Jane Herzog, and Maris Krasnow bring a background (Continued on page 32.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

R

ising enrollments and the current focus on the value of early childhood, childhood, and special education point to excellent job prospects for teachers.The Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education Dual Certification Program prepares you for teaching positions in grade levels 1-6.Teaching positions are available in public and private schools, general education, and inclusive and segregated special education settings, including homebased, hospital, and residential settings.The Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education Dual Certification Program prepares you to teach all young children, birth through grade 2, in a variety of settings that include center-based and home-based infant and toddler and early intervention programs, day care, Head Start, and private and public schools and preschools.To qualify for initial certification in New York, you will be required to take the New York State certification examinations. Please see your adviser for more detailed information. Graduates of our programs also move on to related fields and graduate programs where the skills of teaching in childhood, early childhood, and special education are valuable assets.These include positions such as counselor, librarian, supervisor and administrator, school psychologist, curriculum specialist, and staff developer. A sampling of positions graduates have obtained include • Head teacher or team-teacher • Resource room teacher • Consulting teacher • Itinerant teacher • Inclusion coordinator • Head Start director • Assistant teacher

• Social service agency caseworker • Children’s television producer • Children’s book editor • Corporate employee trainer • Fire Department curriculum developer

“I had great student teaching experiences in New York City, and the opportunity to spend a semester at Bennett College in North Carolina was culturally rewarding for me. Now, I’m opening my own preschool with a curriculum that includes special needs students. My NYU education prepared me for this.” SHERILLE SHEPPARD

32 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

(Continued from page 31.) rich in special education to the undergraduate curriculum. Professor M. Trika Smith-Burke is yet another outstanding member of our Department of Teaching and Learning. She specializes in language and literacy acquisition and teaches courses on early literacy intervention and literacy assessment.

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION Opening Doors and Supporting the Diverse Needs of Learners The Certification Program in Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education is designed to prepare teachers for teaching in both childhood (elementary) and special education settings. Program graduates will be prepared to work in collaboration with families and other education professionals to teach children with varying capacities and needs in a variety of instructional environments.

Focusing on How Children Learn and Develop Our Certification Program in Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning is an urban-centered and field-based program that gives you a thorough command of an integrated curriculum grounded in a deep understanding of children’s growth and development, with an emphasis on human variability. You will have practical experience in the field, and you will gain mas-

tery of the various content areas of the elementary curriculum (mathematics, science, social studies, and language arts), as well as learn to create and adapt learning environments that allow all children to grow to their maximum potential.

Dual Certification: Grades 1-6 We prepare you for two types of teacher certification: as a special education teacher (grades 1 through 6) and as a childhood education teacher (grades 1 through 6). This certification will enable you to teach in either general education or inclusive or self-contained special education settings.

Introduction to the Field Throughout your freshman and sophomore years, you will be involved in a variety of educational and other community-based settings. These field experiences will be supported by course work designed to help you understand children and their diverse learning experiences.

teaching in childhood and special education settings that enable you to learn how to employ assessment techniques to guide instruction, design curricula and implement instruction for diverse learners, utilize technology and adaptive equipment, and work collaboratively with parents and other educating professionals. To ensure that all students have the opportunity to work with children of varying abilities and needs, two of these placements will be in special education settings—one of which will be in a self-contained classroom. Settings for these placements will be representative of the variety of settings that serve school-age children. Your student teaching is supervised by a cooperating teacher at your school site and by a member of our faculty. Faculty supervision ensures continuity between your classroom work and field experiences.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION

Field Experience and Student Teaching

Supporting All Young Children’s Learning: A Unique Program

During your junior and senior years, you will be engaged in a variety of student teaching experiences. After your admittance to the professional program in your junior year, you will begin a series of four field-based student teaching experiences. You will begin the program in a field placement that is designed to give you focused experience in a learning environment that addresses the needs of diverse learners. You will subsequently have three semesters of student

The Certification Program in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education, designed to prepare teachers for teaching in both early childhood (birth through second grade) and early childhood special education settings, is unique among undergraduate programs. At NYU we believe that all early childhood teachers should be prepared to work with young children who come to them with varying capacities and needs. With a strong focus

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

on the linguistic and developmental diversity found in typically and atypically developing children, program graduates will be prepared to work in collaboration with families and other educational professionals to create environments supportive of all children’s learning.

Focusing on How Children Learn and Develop Our Certification Program in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning is an urban-centered and field-based program that gives you a thorough command of an integrated curriculum grounded in a deep understanding of children’s growth and development, with an emphasis on human variability. Throughout your program, you will focus on the application of theory and practice through fully integrated experiences in early childhood and special education.

Dual Certification: Birth-Grade 2 We prepare you for two types of teacher certification: as a special education teacher (birth through grade 2) and as an early childhood education teacher (birth through grade 2). This enables you to teach in either general education or inclusive or self-contained special education settings, as well as early intervention, home-based programs, day care, and other infant/toddler programs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Childhood, Early Childhood, and Special Education • 33

Introduction to the Field Throughout your freshman and sophomore years, you will be involved in a variety of educational and other community-based settings. These field experiences will be supported by course work designed to help you understand children and their diverse learning experiences, within a family context.

Field Experience and Student Teaching Throughout your program, you will be involved in a variety of field experiences. After you begin your specialized program in early childhood education and early childhood special education in your junior year, you will have four experiences in various settings with young children. You will begin the program in a placement with infant and toddler-aged children in the first semester of your junior

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

year. You will then have subsequent experiences with preschool and kindergarten-aged children and with children in grades 1 to 2. In your final semester, you will have the opportunity to complete your student teaching experience by returning to the age range and type of setting of your choice. To ensure that all students have the opportunity to work with children of varying abilities, two of these placements will be in settings serving children with disabilities. Settings for your placements will be repre-

sentative of the variety of homeand center-based environments that serve young children and their families, including nursery schools, child care centers, Head Start and Early Head Start, hospitals, recreation programs, and public and private schools. Your student teaching is supervised by a cooperating teacher at your school site and by a member of our faculty. Faculty supervision ensures continuity between your classroom work and field experiences.

34 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM This dual certification program provides preparation for those who want to teach in both childhood (elementary, grades 1-6) and special education settings. Students are exposed to an integrated curriculum emphasizing human variability and are prepared in the various content areas of the elementary curriculum. In addition to core courses in child growth and development and to pedagogical courses, all students are required to take a minimum of 60 points in liberal arts classes. The student’s program of study includes a full range of field experiences and observations, culminating in three semesters of student teaching opportunities in a public or independent school setting.

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION DUAL CERTIFICATION Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)*

48-52 Points

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Culture. V55.07••

4

Natural Science

4

Natural Science

4

Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001

4

Mathematics for Decision Making (or alternate). E12.0002

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foreign Language I

4

Foreign Language II

4

Speech Communication.* E21.0033

4

Curriculum Coordinators Frances Rust (212) 998-5463

*Students exempt from speech may use those credits toward their liberal arts concentration.

Chelsea Bailey (212) 998-5862 Lisa Fleisher (212) 998-5390 Department of Teaching and Learning The Steinhardt School of Education New York University East Building, Suite 220 239 Greene Street New York, NY 10003-6674

Content Core: Liberal Arts Concentration Students must have 30 points from a liberal arts concentration, to be selected by advisement from one or more of the liberal arts and science areas. Concentration may include courses that also satisfy liberal arts requirements.Total credits may then be reduced by 8 to 12 points.

Common Pedagogical Core New Student Seminar and site visits (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Human Development II: Childhood. E63.0022

2

Human Development II: Early Childhood. E63.0021 or Human Development I: Early Adolescence. E63.0023 2 Foundations of Special Education. E75.0083

3

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

• General education requirements, see the Morse Academic Plan, page 102.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

21 Points

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Childhood, Early Childhood, and Special Education • 35

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY Specialized Pedagogical Core

35 Points

• All secondary education fields

Integrating Seminar In Childhood and Special Education II—Assessment to Guide Instruction. E25.1006

1

Integrating Seminar In Childhood and Special Education III—Curricular Design and Instruction for Diverse Learners. E25.1007

1

Integrating Seminar In Childhood and Special Education IV—Professional Development and Collaboration with Parents and Other Professionals. E25.1008

1

Language and Reading Instruction for Early Childhood. E25.1176

3

Language and Reading Instruction for Childhood I. E25.1177

2

Language and Reading Instruction for Childhood II. E25.1178

1

Teaching Elementary School Math I. E12.1023

1

Integrated Curricula in Science, Health, and Social Studies in Childhood Education. E25.1141

2

Fieldwork and Student Teaching

Integrated Curricula in Math, Science, and Social Studies in Childhood Education I. E25.1142

3

Observation and Participation in Special Education. E75.1504

2

Supervised Student Teaching in Childhood Education (Grades 1-6). E25.1354

2

Integrated Curricula in Math, Science, and Social Studies in Childhood Education II. E25.1143 3

10 Points

Integrated Arts in Childhood Education. E25.1080

2

Integrated Arts in Childhood Education. E85.1055

2

Supervised Student Teaching in Childhood Education (Grades 1-6). E25.1355

3

Strategies for Teaching Children with Challenging Behavior. E75.1161

2

Supervised Student Teaching in Special Education (Grades 1-6). E75.1009

3

Principles and Strategies for Teaching Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities I. E75.1007 2 Principles and Strategies for Teaching Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities II. E75.1008 3 Principles and Strategies for Teaching Students with Severe and Multiple Disabilities. E75.1010 3 Classroom Assessment. E75.1035

2

Integrating Seminar in Childhood and Special Education I—Contexts and Learning Environments of Diverse Learners. E25.1005 1 The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Teacher Certification Requirements In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses shown here reflect the changes approved by the New York State Educa-

tion Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

• Applied Psychological Studies

36 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in early childhood and early childhood special education is designed to prepare teachers for teaching in both early childhood (birth through second grade) and early childhood special education settings. The pedagogical core introduces students to an integrated curriculum, emphasizing the theories of teaching and learning, educational formation, and linguistic and developmental diversity in early childhood. In addition, all students are required to take 60 points in liberal arts. The student’s program of study includes a full range of field experiences and observations, culminating in three semesters of student teaching opportunities in a public or independent school setting.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION DUAL CERTIFICATION

Curriculum Coordinators

Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)*

48-52 Points

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Culture. V55.07••

4

Natural Science

4

Natural Science

4

Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001

4

Mathematics for Decision Making (or alternate). E12.0002

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foreign Language I

4

Foreign Language II

4

Speech Communication.* E21.0033

4

Frances Rust (212) 998-5463 Chelsea Bailey (212) 998-5862

*Students exempt from speech may use those credits toward their liberal arts concentration.

Content Core: Liberal Arts Concentration Students must have 30 points from a liberal arts concentration, to be selected by advisement from one or more of the liberal arts and science areas. Concentration may include courses that also satisfy liberal arts requirements.Total credits may then be reduced by 8 to 12 points.

Common Pedagogical Core New Student Seminar and site visits (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Human Development II: Early Childhood. E63.0021 2 Human Development II: Childhood. E63.0022

2

Foundations of Special Education. E75.0083

3

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

Lisa Fleisher (212) 998-5390 Maris Krasnow (212) 998-5207

• General education requirements, see the Morse Academic Plan, page 102.

Department of Teaching and Learning The Steinhardt School of Education New York University East Building, Suite 220 239 Greene Street New York, NY 10003-6674

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

21 Points

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Childhood, Early Childhood, and Special Education • 37

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY

• All secondary education fields

Specialized Pedagogical Core

28 Points

Principles and Practices for Teaching Students with Severe and Multiple Disabilities. E75.1010

3

Introduction to Early Childhood and Special Education. E25.1103

2

The Role of the Professional in Early Childhood Special Education. E75.1510

2

Learning and Experience in Family, School, and Community. E25.0019

2

Integration Seminar in Early Childhood and Special Education. E75.1012

3

Language and Literacy. E25.1175

2

Language and Reading Instruction in Early Childhood. E25.1176

2

Fieldwork and Student Teaching

Mathematical Concepts in Integrated EC/SE Curriculum I. E12.1032

2

Observation and Participation in Early Childhood Special Education. E75.1503 2

Mathematical Concepts in Integrated EC/SE Curriculum II. E12.1033

2

Supervised Student Teaching in Early Childhood Edu3 cation.† E25.1357

Integrated Curricula in EC/SE Classrooms I: Science, Social Studies, Drama, and Art. E25.1024

2

Supervised Student Teaching in Early Childhood Spe3 cial Education.† E75.1509

Integrated Curricula in EC/SE Classrooms II: Science, Social Studies, Movement, and Music. E25.1026

2

Instructional Strategies for Supporting Diverse Learners in Early Childhood Settings I. E75.1047

2

Instructional Strategies for Supporting Diverse Learners in Early Childhood Settings II. E75.1048

† Students are required to repeat either E25.1357 or E75.1509 for 4 points.

2

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Teacher Certification Requirements In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses shown here reflect the changes

12 Points

approved by the New York State Education Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

• Applied Psychological Studies

38 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Communication Studies

THE CHALLENGES OF THE INFORMATION AGE

AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM

Samuel F. B. Morse, a professor at NYU, invented the telegraph in 1844 and the modern communications revolution was born. Since then, a steady stream of technological innovations has transformed society. We live in a media age. From film and television, to books and magazines, to newer forms of computer-assisted communication such as the Internet, the diversity and influence of the media cannot be overestimated. Businesses, governments, politics, civic affairs, and nonprofit organizations all depend on the development of effective communication strategies and skills. As communication becomes increasingly sophisticated, the need expands for university-prepared professionals in this diverse field. Our Bachelor of Science Program in Communication Studies in the Department of Culture and Communication provides preprofessional educational experience that explores the social and cultural impact of communication techniques and serves as a base for either an entry-level position or further

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Communication Studies • 39

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

specialization. The program’s greatest strength is its internationally recognized, full-time faculty. Its most exciting feature is its interdisciplinary nature, offering opportunities to take courses in various programs throughout The Steinhardt School of Education and the University.

government and corporate policies affect what we will see in movies, on television, and in print and even what we will hear on compact discs.

The major components of the program are the following: a strong liberal arts preparation; core courses in communications theory and systems of communication analysis; a concentration in one of three areas of professional practice; and the opportunity for further specialized course work according to your own interests and goals.

Understanding the human and technological systems of communication calls for a strong grounding in the humanities, natural sciences, mathematics, foreign languages, and social sciences. Students in all concentrations select from a wide range of such courses in NYU’s College of Arts and Science.

The Liberal Arts Foundation

A Choice of Concentration Distinguished Faculty Students are certain to come across the department’s distinguished chair, Professor Neil Postman, among the many eminent members of the Department of Culture and Communication. Professor Postman is interested in the effects of large-scale technological change on the vitality of human interaction—something he has conveyed in over 16 distinguished books that have been translated into half a dozen languages. Professor Mark Crispin Miller analyzes the economics of the media industry and is especially interested in how the ownership of media constricts freedom of speech. Professor JoEllen Fisherkeller researches media literacy—in particular, how young people react to films and television programs and how we need to educate the young to respond more intelligently. Professor Robin Means Coleman examines the representation of minority groups in our popular culture and mass media, particularly the ways in which African Americans are depicted. Professor Ted Magder examines ways in which

You choose the area in which you want to focus: 1. Mass Media and Communication provides a humanistic approach to understanding the impact that modern communications technologies have on people, society, and culture. Emphasis is given to an examination of how these media relate to human perception, feeling, thought, expression, and value. 2. Speech and Interpersonal Communication emphasizes professional practices and strategies in the psychological principles of communication, speaking on radio and television, addressing an audience and within a group, interviewing, public relations, conflict resolution and interpersonal communications, and understanding intercultural communication and gender and communication. 3. Communication Media and Technology focuses on professional practices and skills in communicating through print, video, film, pho(Continued on page 40.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

G

raduates from the baccalaureate Communication Studies Program hold a variety of positions in a wide range of communication areas such as the following: • Advertising and marketing • Broadcasting (radio and television) • Corporate communications • Cultural and civic affairs • Education • Government service and public administration • Graphic communications management and computer applications • Health-related services • Human resource development • Politics • Public relations • Publishing (book, magazine, and newspaper) • Speech and professional communications Some examples of jobs obtained by recent graduates: • Production assistant—Showtime Network • Production assistant—WNBC • Graphic communications—New York Press • Researcher—MTV • Assistant account executive—Backer Spielvogel Bates (advertising agency) • Editorial assistant—Scholastic magazine In addition, several graduates have continued on to advanced study in media and communications or in fields such as law, public administration, and management. HELPING YOU START YOUR CAREER

The Communication Studies Program coordinates student placement in internships where they gain valuable practical experience. Internships often lead to future employment. Graduates of the program regularly inform us of job openings and provide referrals.

40 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in communication studies combines 60 points of liberal arts with 16 points of required core courses that cover the history and perspectives of communication, media criticism, and language, thought, and culture. Majors are also required to take 16 points of electives in their area(s) of concentration that include speech and interpersonal communication, communication media and technology, mass media and communication, and graphic communication. In addition, students choose 12 points of specialization electives by advisement from some of the following areas: journalism; marketing and advertising; cinema and motion pictures; graphic communications; and video, film, and television, to name just a few. Additionally, students select from 8 points of restricted electives by advisement from each of the following areas: oral communication and technology and society. Students also choose 16 points from any liberal arts or communicationrelated area of interest. Department of Culture and Communication The Steinhardt School of Education New York University East Building, 7th Floor 239 Greene Street New York, NY 100036674 (212) 998-5635

COMMUNICATION STUDIES Freshman Year

32 Points

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

32 Points

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture

Speech Communication. E21.0033

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science I. V55.02•• 4

4

MAJOR

MAJOR New Student Seminar. E03.0001

Perspectives on Communication. E59.0001

4

TOTAL

16

Language,Thought, and Culture. E59.0010

4

Concentration (see below)

4

TOTAL

16

Spring Semester

Spring Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Quantitative Reasoning. V55.01••

4

Liberal Arts Requirement: Foreign Language

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture

4

MAJOR

MAJOR History of Communication. E59.0003

4

TOTAL

Introduction to Media Criticism. E59.0014

4

Concentration (see below)

4

TOTAL

16

16

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

(Continued from page 39.) tography/multi-image, computer, and videodisc materials and programs. Emphasis is placed on the design, production, and use of communication materials and programs. 4. Graphic Communication focuses on professional practices, strategies, and innovations in commercial printing, advertising, marketing, corporate communications, and the allied industries, emphasizing management techniques and computer technologies.

Variety of Internships Students may earn up to 6 points of academic credits through paid and unpaid internships in fields ranging

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

from advertising and television to the recording industry and public relations. Recent internship settings include MTV, VH1, Backer Spielvogel Bates (advertising agency), NBC, Whitehead Associates (public relations), Chrysalis Records, Lorimar TV, World-Wide TV News, WABC-TV, Kerschenbaum and Bond Advertising, The Late Show with David Letterman, and Rolling Stone magazine.

Student Activities The Communication Club, the undergraduate student club in the Department of Culture and Communication, offers students the opportunity to participate in a full range of academic and social events, such as a lecture series

and an annual faculty-student offcampus retreat. The club is involved in community service and offers career preparation and networking. The department supports a student chapter of the national organization, Lambda Pi Eta, an honors society for communication studies majors, as well as PRSSA, the Public Relations Student Society of America, a national organization for students with interests in public relations and public affairs. Students also take advantage of the wide variety of professional associations and organizations in New York City that organize regular events, such as the Center for Communication.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Communication Studies • 41

STUDY OPTIONS:

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Junior Year

32 Points

Senior Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

MAJOR

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science II. V55.03••

4

Liberal Arts Elective

4

MAJOR Concentration (see below)

4

Specialization Elective (see below)

4

TOTAL

16

Specialization Elective (see below)

4

Restricted Elective

4

Unrestricted Elective

4

Unrestricted Elective

4

TOTAL

16

Spring Semester Integrating Liberal Arts. E59.1200

LIBERAL ARTS

4

MAJOR

Liberal Arts Elective

4

Liberal Arts Elective

4

MAJOR Concentration (see below)

4

Specialization Elective (see below)

4

Restricted Elective

4

Unrestricted Elective

4

Unrestricted Elective

4

TOTAL

16

16

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Concentration

Specialization Electives

Restricted Electives

Requirements for the four concentrations are fulfilled by selecting 16 points from one or more of these areas:

Students in the Communication Studies Program fulfill specialization requirements by selecting 12 points from one or more of the following areas of study:

To be selected by advisement from either of the following areas of study:

1. Mass Media and Communication (see E59 courses, pages 128-29) 2. Speech and Interpersonal Communication (see E21 courses, pages 11719) 3. Communication Media and Technology (see E19 and E24 courses, pages 116, 120-21) 4. Graphic Communication (see E24 courses, pages 120-21)

Minor: A student may establish a minor, choosing journalism, psychology, English, or other subjects in combination with communication studies.

LIBERAL ARTS

Spring Semester

TOTAL

32 Points

Areas of Concentration: Students select an area of concentration from the following choices: mass media and communication; speech and interpersonal communication; communication media and technology; and graphic communication.

• American Sign Language • Cinema and motion pictures • Computer science and technology • Graphic communication • Journalism • Marketing and advertising • Photography • Speech and interpersonal communication • Theatre • Video, film, and television • Written communication

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

• Oral communication • Technology and society

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE: • English Education • Foreign Language Education

42 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Educational Theatre

Certification Program in Educational Theatre TEACHING THROUGH DRAMATIC ART

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATIONAL THEATRE

Theatre is inherently educational—a “school of weeping and laughing,” as Spanish playwright García Lorca once called it. As we enter a new century, America is rediscovering the teaching power that flows from the immediacy and involvement of live theatre and classroom drama. In schools, with the advent of Learning Standards for the Arts, the discipline of theatre is assuming a more vital role in teaching not only the lessons of life, but also academic subjects across the curriculum. When our Bachelor of Science Program in Educational Theatre in the Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions was established in 1966, it was the first such response to the expanding opportunities for dramatic art in the schools. Today, it continues to enjoy the unique advantage of drawing on the resources of New York City, the nation’s leading center of theatrical production and experimentation. Now, we prepare artist-teachers for New York State Teacher Certification in Theatre, All Grades, and offer our

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Educational Theatre • 43

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

students hands-on experiences as actors, playwrights, and producers of theatre for young audiences. We balance academic studies, covering literature and history, the arts, and social sciences, with specialist and practical courses in theatre and drama in education.

Distinguished Faculty Among our many distinguished faculty in the Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions, especially in undergraduate studies, is Professor Alistair Martin-Smith. Professor Martin-Smith has written extensively on drama and interactive technology and the uses of drama in teaching, writing, and the development of self-image. He has helped students create over half a dozen plays per year and continues to help student teachers bring their theatrical skills and artistic vision to students in the urban classroom. Professor Philip Taylor brings an international reputation in drama in education and arts education research. He works with student teachers in the drama classrooms of elementary and secondary schools.

Preparing the Theatre Artist-Teacher Our aim is to prepare the theatre artist-teacher for a range of opportunities in schools and in theatre for young audiences. We offer participation in our season of productions each year at the historic Provincetown Playhouse, along with workshop, studio, and advanced directors’ productions. Students are actors, technicians, stagehands, or members of costume, lighting, and property

crews, as well as members of the publicity and theatre management teams. We produce a variety of plays for young audiences, including musicals, classics, educational works, and new plays by faculty and students. We also offer a choice of various internship possibilities at the American Place Theatre, the New Victory Theatre, and the Roundabout Theatre. Settings include NYU’s Creative Arts Team, which offers classes, theatre in education, and youth theatre productions throughout the New York area, as well as in Canada and in Europe.

Certification in Theatre, All Grades The goal of Certification in Theatre, All Grades, is to provide opportunities for the theatre artist-teacher to explore ideas and concepts in the classroom and on stage. We provide integrated course offerings in drama, dramatic literature, and theatre, which tie into the four New York State Learning Standards for the Arts. The curriculum, which requires the completion of 132 points of study, is designed to develop professional teachers of drama and theatre in elementary, middle, and secondary schools. Course work is offered by the current faculty in the Program in Educational Theatre, in collaboration with the faculty in the Department of Teaching and Learning. All students will be required to complete fieldwork in educational settings and student teaching experiences in drama and theatre at the elementary and secondary levels. (Continued on page 44.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

O

ur graduates are prepared to be classroom teachers in all grades and performers, directors, and producers of theatre for young audiences.

• They establish careers as teachers in elementary, middle, and high schools and, with advanced graduate study, in colleges and universities. • They work in regional and community theatres and in drama programs in museums, community centers, and recreation centers. • They become drama specialists in language arts, humanities, and special education programs. • They pursue advanced graduate study in dramatic literature, the humanities, theatre production, and drama therapy. • They develop as writers and producers of plays for young audiences for stage, television, and film. For further information, please contact Professor Alistair Martin-Smith by telephone at (212) 998-5266 or by E-mail at [emailprotected]

44 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The program in education theatre prepares artistteachers for New York State Certification in Theatre, All Grades. The course of study emphasizes a hands-on learning experience, providing integrated course offerings in drama, dramatic literature, and theatre. More advanced theories of stagecraft, performance, and production are explored within the content core, and this is augmented in the pedagogical core by an investigation of educational development within an artistic environment. In addition to the dramatic and pedagogical cores, all students are required to take a minimum of 60 points in liberal arts courses. The student’s program of study includes fieldwork in educational settings and culminates in student teaching experiences in drama and theatre at the elementary and secondary levels. Alistair Martin-Smith Program Director Pless Annex, Room 23 82 Washington Square East New York, NY 10003-6680 (212) 998-5868 Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions The Steinhardt School of Education New York University Education Building, Suite 777 35 West Fourth Street New York, NY 10012-1172

EDUCATIONAL THEATRE, ALL GRADES Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

60 Points

Foreign Language

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Content Core*

36 Points

Required Courses Stagecraft I. E17.0009 or Stagecraft II. E17.0010

3-4

Acting I. E17.0027

3-4 3-4

3-4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Character Study and Motivation. E17.1051

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Masters of Modern Drama. E17.1057 or E17.1058

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Culture. V55.07••

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Quantitative Reasoning. V55.0101 or Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science I. V55.0201

4

Acting II. E17.0037

3-4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science II. V55.0301

4

Introduction to Theatre for Young Audiences. E17.1005/1006

2-4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Design for the Stage. E17.1017

1-3

Performing Arts in Western Civilization. E85.1505

4

Theory of Creative Drama. E17.1065

3-4

Physical Theatre Improvisation. E17.1113

3

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

4 Restricted Electives

English or dramatic literature (by advisement) Voice and Diction. E21.0032

Directing. E17.1081 or E17.1082

3

12 4

2

Methods of Conducting Creative Drama. E17.1067 3 Masks and Puppetry. E17.1079

3

*Thirty-six points selected from “Required Courses” (18 points) and “Restricted Electives” (18 points by advisement).

• General education requirements, see the Morse Academic Plan, page 102.

(Continued from page 43.)

Hands-On Learning The program gives you “hands-on” learning experiences in teaching through roleplay, improvisation, mime, story drama, puppetry, mask-making, creative drama, and issue-based drama programs. Special workshops, open to undergraduates and graduate students alike, are conducted on topics such as children’s theatre, African American theatre, British theatre, and process drama. Visiting lecturers have included distinguished theatrical leaders from

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

around the world, such as Gavin Bolton, David Booth, Tony Jackson, Jonathan Neelands, Cecily O’Neill, and Brian Way. Students also have ample opportunities to see outstanding New York theatrical productions at discounted ticket prices.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Educational Theatre • 45

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

Styles of Acting and Directing I. E17.1099 or Styles of Acting and Directing II. E17.1100

• Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education

3-4 3-4

Musical Theatre: Background and Analysis. E17.1101/1102

3

Beginning Playwriting. E17.1105

2

Stage Lighting. E17.1143

3-4

Costume Design. E17.1175

3-4

Common Pedagogical Core

13 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Human Development II: Childhood. E63.0022

2

Human Development II: Adolescence. E63.0024

2

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

Specialized Pedagogical Core

Introduction to Educational Theatre I. E17.0050

3

Introduction to Educational Theatre II. E17.0051

3

Dramatic Activities in the Elementary Classroom. E17.1029

2

Dramatic Activities in the Secondary Classroom. E17.1068

2

Student Teaching:Theatre in the Elementary Classroom. E17.1134

4

Student Teaching:Theatre in the Secondary Classroom. E17.1174

4

Drama in Education I. E17.2193

3

Drama in Education II. E17.2194

3

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Teacher Certification Requirements In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses shown here reflect the changes approved by the New York State Educa-

24 Points

tion Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

• Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education • Communication Studies • English Education • Music

46 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

English Education

Certification Program in English Education (Grades 7 through 12) THE INTERACTION OF LANGUAGE AND LEARNING

OUR REPUTATION CONTINUES TO GROW

Language is our most important tool for spoken communication, but it is much more than that. Through a novel, poem, or play, we can experience, understand, and express feelings ranging from joy to sadness, from love to alienation. Through language, we develop our sense of tradition and our social, ethical, and moral concerns. Language that is sensitively and intelligently shaped can help us to learn who we are and who others are, too. In the truest sense of education—to lead a student to the knowledge of self in the world—the teaching of language and literature offers exceptional opportunities and personal rewards. Our Bachelor of Science Program, Teaching English, Grades 7-12, in the Department of Teaching and Learning, has long been regarded as among the finest in the country. Our international reputation has grown through our continuing summer abroad program in Oxford, England, and our recent

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • English Education • 47

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

sponsorship of the Conference of the International Federation for Teachers of English, held at The Steinhardt School of Education.

Distinguished Faculty Students majoring in English education may work with Professor Gordon Pradl, one of our many gifted English education faculty. Professor Pradl specializes in composition, sociolinguistics, and the teaching of literature. As with his colleagues, he holds a deep commitment for the role writing and literature play in bringing out the creative inner voice of student teachers and the students that they, themselves, will be guiding. Active in his own writing, Professor Pradl is the author of several articles on narrative language, the coauthor of Learning to Write/ Writing to Learn, and the author of Literature for Democracy.

Relationships Provide the Key Many other programs in English education tend to isolate the different aspects of learning and teaching, but in our program they are inseparable. We integrate all aspects of English education—theories of language and literature, literature’s content and meaning, and methods for teaching adolescents. You study the relationship among the reader, the literary work, and the writer. You learn how to develop, apply, and evaluate teaching materials and strategies. And you learn how teacher, student, school, and community interact with each other in the educational process. In effect, you build two concentrations in one—deepening your understanding of language, composition, and

literature while becoming skilled in reflective teaching.

In Touch with the Latest Ideas The undergraduate program is enriched by our graduate programs and the ongoing research and curriculum development of the faculty in The Steinhardt School of Education’s Department of Teaching and Learning. As a result, you are in contact with and benefit from the latest thinking and practice in the field of English education.

Pursuing a Special Interest We encourage small-group collaboration in learning, and you may negotiate with your professors the kinds of projects and other learning experiences relevant for a particular course. You will have frequent opportunities to develop your creative potential through writing poetry, short stories, and plays within your courses. There are, in addition, numerous campus literary publications that welcome your interest and participation.

Your Teaching Internship In your junior year, you begin your student teaching experience by observing secondary school teachers and their students in the classroom. In your senior year, under the guidance of your supervising teacher, you assume responsibility for teaching an actual class. Teacher education is a collaborative effort, involving you, the experienced cooperating teacher in whose classroom you will be working, and a member of our faculty.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

O

ur graduates have a wide range of opportunities in schools as well as in other fields.You are prepared to teach English in grades 7 through 12.To qualify for provisional or initial certification in New York and most other states, you take the New York State Teacher Certification Examinations following graduation. Recent graduates have obtained teaching positions at such schools as the Satellite Academy (New York City alternative school), Hunter College High School, and East Falmouth (Massachusetts) High School. Other graduates have pursued careers in publishing, corporate communications, technical writing, and journalism. For example, a recent graduate accepted a position in children’s television at CBS, and another became an editor at a publishing house. Many graduates also go on for their master’s or doctoral degrees in English education or a related field. HELPING YOU START YOUR CAREER

Student teaching placements are often sources for employment after graduation. And the New York City Board of Education recruits on campus as do other employers through the NYU Office of Career Services.

“When I was a community college student, completing my bachelor’s degree seemed a faraway goal.Through The Steinhardt School of Education’s Community College Transfer Opportunity Program, I attained that goal.Thanks to the school’s Next Step Scholarship, I also completed my master’s degree in English education at The Steinhardt School of Education while working as a tutor and English workshop instructor for NYU’s Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP).” AMIRA AFIFI

48 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The program in English education, grades 7-12, offers students the opportunity to explore the meanings and messages of literary works and the ways in which they are imparted to others. Through an integrated curriculum, the theories of language and literature are examined, as is the relationship among the reader, the literary work, and the writer. In addition to a content core that provides for exploration in literature (including British, American, and multiethnic works) and composition, students are required to take a minimum of 60 points in liberal arts courses. In the pedagogical core, students are introduced to the theories and applications of integrating reading and writing in the adolescent educational process and are taught to develop, apply, and evaluate teaching materials and strategies. The student’s program of study culminates in two semesters of teaching opportunities in a public or independent school setting.

TEACHING ENGLISH, GRADES 7-12

John S. Mayher Curriculum Coordinator (212) 998-5245 Department of Teaching and Learning The Steinhardt School of Education New York University East Building, Suite 201 239 Greene Street New York, NY 10003-6674

• General education requirements, see the Morse Academic Plan, page 102.

Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

52 Points

Content Core

36 Points

May include courses that also satisfy liberal arts requirements.

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Cultures. V55.07••

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science I. V55.02••

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science II. V55.03••

4

Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001

4

Mathematics by advisement

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foreign Language I

4

Foreign Language II

4

Speech Communication.* E21.0033

4

Literature as Exploration. V41.0071

4

The Reading of Poetry. V41.0193

4

Advanced Composition. V41.0885

4

One British literature course

4

One speech, drama, or media course

4

One multiethnic literature course

4

One American literature course

4

Literature Seminar for English Majors. V41.0930

4

Teaching English in a Multidialectal Society. V41.0589

4

*May be exempt by examination—substitute will be a liberal arts elective in speech, drama, or media.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • English Education • 49

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY Common Pedagogical Core

21 Points

Specialized Pedagogical Core

12 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Human Development I: Early Adolescence. E63.0023

2

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Human Development II: Adolescence. E63.0024

2

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Integrating Reading and Writing with Adolescents I. E11.1600

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Educating Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom (with fieldwork). E75.1005 4 Education as a Social Institution (with fieldwork). E20.1015 or Critical Study of Education. E55.1031

Integrating Reading and Writing with Adolescents II. E11.1601 or Integrating English and History with Adolescents. E27.1020

3 0

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

Fieldwork and Student Teaching

12 Points

Student Teaching the English Language Arts in the Middle School. E11.1602

4-8

Student Teaching the English Language Arts in the High School. E11.1603

4-8

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses shown here reflect the changes approved by the New York State Educa-

4

3

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

Teacher Certification Requirements

4

tion Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

• Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education • Communication Studies • Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education • Educational Theatre

50 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Foreign Language Education Multilingual-Multicultural Study in Teaching Chinese • French • German • Hebrew • Italian • Japanese • Latin • Russian • Spanish

Certification Program in Foreign Language Education (Grades 7 through 12) CROSSING CULTURAL BOUNDARIES

MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES ON LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

As communications technologies shrink the world, teaching a foreign language becomes a skill increasingly in demand. In business, travel, technology, law, government, entertainment, and other endeavors, people now interact daily, even hourly, over all parts of the globe. In New York City alone, more than 200 languages are spoken in the public schools. Teaching another language often becomes the key to understanding another culture and finding ways for all people—children, adolescents, and adults—to live and work together. The Steinhardt School of Education’s Department of Teaching and Learning has integrated its programs in bilingual education, foreign language education, and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) to provide a rich environment of language learning rarely found at other institutions. The Bachelor of Science Programs in Teaching a Foreign Language, Grades 7-12, also interact with various

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Foreign Language Education • 51

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

foreign language programs in the College of Arts and Science and the graduate-level international education program at the School of Education. As a consequence of this interaction, you mix with a diverse group of students to gain multilingual and multicultural awareness and appreciation.

Distinguished Faculty Among our gifted faculty in foreign language education is Professor Frank Tang. He is deeply committed to bringing all voices into the increasingly complex urban educational setting, studying ways in which second and foreign language instruction are most effectively pursued, as well as the intimate connection between language and the study of culture.

A Broad Education Our goal is to provide you with a broad education in language development, not just to train you in a single language. Through the baccalaureate program, we expose you to current research and diverse approaches to language acquisition; we prepare you to make appropriate instructional choices in the classroom; and we work with you to develop the cross-cultural sensitivity so critical in this field.

Language Options You specialize in one of several languages: Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian, or Spanish. Most language courses are taken in the College of Arts and Science. In The Steinhardt School of Education courses, you learn about teaching techniques and methods; creating curricula, materials, and audiovisual aids; and testing for language proficiency.

Your Teaching Internship During two semesters of classroom observation and student teaching in your junior and senior years, you test your own teaching techniques and instructional plans under the supervision of an experienced teacher and members of our faculty. Student teaching placements are arranged according to your target language of study in public and independent schools.

Special NYU Resources Learning experiences can be enriched through several specialized University resources such as the Deutsches Haus, La Maison Française, Casa Italiana ZerilliMarimò, or the Hagop Kevorkian Center. These facilities have important reference materials and conduct cultural, academic, and social events. You may also use the NYU foreign language and computer laboratories. These will enable you to improve your language proficiency and to acquire telecommunications skills to participate in electronic conferences.

Helping You Start Your Career The Foreign Language Conference, sponsored each year by NYU and the New York City Board of Education, provides you with an opportunity to meet foreign language professionals and possible employers from throughout the metropolitan area. The Board of Education also recruits prospective teachers on campus each year. The NYU Office of Career Services helps students develop résumé writing and interviewing skills. (Continued on page 53.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

A

s a foreign language educator, you have a wide range of career possibilities. Rising high school enrollments and increased interest in bilingual and multicultural education offer many opportunities. We prepare you for teaching a foreign language to students in grades 7 through 12. In addition to the course work, to qualify for provisional or initial certification in New York, you are required to take the New York State Teacher Certification Examinations and, in most other states, you are required to take the National Teachers Examination after graduation. You may choose to use your preparation in foreign language education to find a position in publishing, the travel industry, government, international business, interpretation, and translation as well as with public, private, and community organizations involved in bilingual and multicultural activities. The following positions are samples of those obtained by recent graduates: • Teachers of foreign language (Spanish, French, German, Russian, Italian, Japanese, etc.), New York City public schools • Teachers of foreign language in New Jersey, Westchester County, Rockland County, Long Island public schools • Teachers of Spanish and French, LaGuardia High School of the Performing Arts • Teachers of French and Japanese, United Nations High School

52 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The foreign language curriculum offers students the training necessary to be teachers of Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian, or Spanish. In addition to intensive linguistic work in the language of the student’s choice (to be selected by advisement), the core course of study exposes students to diverse approaches to second language acquisition and fosters cross-cultural sensitivity. In addition to the pedagogical core, in which students learn about teaching techniques and methods and creating curricula, students are also required to take a minimum of 60 points in liberal arts. The student’s program of study culminates in two semesters of teaching opportunities in a public or independent school setting. Frank Tang Curriculum Coordinator (212) 998-5498 Department of Teaching and Learning The Steinhardt School of Education New York University East Building, Suite 200 239 Greene Street New York, NY 10003-6674

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION, GRADES 7-12 Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

52 Points

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Culture. V55.07••

4

Natural Science

4

Natural Science

4

Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001

4

Mathematics for Decision Making (or alternate). E12.0002

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foreign Language I (major language)

4

Foreign Language II (major language)

4

Speech Communication.* E21.0033

4

Content Core

Students must select 28 points in target language by advisement. A total of 36 points (40 points for Latin) is required to claim a major. Eight points in the target language are included in the liberal arts core. May include courses that also satisfy liberal arts requirements.

*May be exempt by examination—substitute will be a liberal arts elective or major language course.

• General education requirements, see the Morse Academic Plan, page 102.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

28 Points

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Foreign Language Education • 53

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Common Pedagogical Core

33 Points

Specialization Pedagogical Core

20 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Teaching Foreign Languages: Theory and Practice. E29.1999

4

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

The Second Language Classroom: Elementary and Secondary Schools. E27.2201

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Field Experiences and Seminar: Teaching Foreign Languages. E29.1915

4

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

Supervised Student Teaching in Foreign Languages (High School). E29.1066

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Supervised Student Teaching in Foreign Languages (Middle School). E29.1065

4

Educating Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom. E75.1005 4 Human Development I: Early Adolescence. E63.0023

2

Human Development II: Adolescence. E63.0024

2

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. E27.1030

4

Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology. E27.1050

4

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

(Continued from page 51.) Student teaching placements often lead to full-time employment upon graduation.

Teacher Certification Requirements In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses

shown here reflect the changes approved by the New York State Education Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

• Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education • Social Studies Education

54 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Mathematics Education

Certification Program in Mathematics Education (Grades 7 through 12) TEACHING THE POWER OF MATHEMATICS

FOCUS ON STATE-OF-THE-ART METHODS

Mathematics is a universal tool, applied by scientists, businesspeople, engineers, and others around the world as they tackle the exciting challenges of the 21st century. Mathematics also helps us all with the increasing complexities of daily living—family budgets, insurance and mortgages, tax returns, and investment and retirement funds. With the challenges of the new century both at home and abroad, the demand for outstanding mathematics teachers in our schools has become critical. In the Bachelor of Science Program in Teaching Mathematics, Grades 7-12, in the Department of Teaching and Learning, our goal is to prepare teachers who believe that the best way to help their students is to think critically about their teaching and to devise ways to improve mathematics education. We focus on current developments in mathematics teaching nationwide and keep the program up-to-date by integrating into our curriculum recommendations from teaching organizations and national commissions.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

SThe Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Mathematics Education • 55

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

We address the issues of ethnicity and gender in mathematics education and work with students to develop strategies to help minorities and females surmount learning barriers.

Faculty on the Cutting Edge Our faculty is involved in various projects funded by government agencies and foundations that are designed to assess and devise new teaching methods in mathematics education. Our students often become part of these efforts, which include using computers and calculators in the classroom and developing new and effective curricula and assessment tools.

Your Teaching Internship In your junior year, you start your internship preparation by visiting schools and observing practicing teachers in the classroom. In your senior year, you have one or two semesters of student teaching in an independent or public school affiliated with our program, under the supervision of experienced mathematics teachers and our own faculty. Recent student teaching placements include Hunter College High School, Manhattan Comprehensive Night and Day High School, and Elisabeth Irwin High School.

Student Activities

You take liberal arts as well as mathematics and computer science courses in the College of Arts and Science. Courses in teaching methods and curriculum development are taken in The Steinhardt School of Education. Special resources available to you include NYU’s internationally renowned Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences and the University’s numerous microcomputer centers.

You are encouraged to become a student member of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics of New York City and the Association of Mathematics Teachers of New York State, as well as the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. These organizations hold many conferences where students meet current teachers and learn about important issues in classroom instruction. Students also receive professional newsletters, journals, and other publications that keep them apprised of research and educational issues.

Small Program, Personal Contact

Helping You Start Your Career

As a student in mathematics education, you are part of a small program. You have daily contact with the fulltime faculty, as well as with a diverse range of students preparing to teach other secondary school subjects.

Our faculty has extensive contacts in the field that lead to information about job openings, and our graduates continually call for recommendations to fill vacancies. Student teaching placements often lead to full-time employment after graduation.

A Variety of Resources

(Continued on page 57.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

P

rospects for mathematics teachers in the secondary schools are excellent in the next decade as the demand grows for increased student proficiency in mathematics. Retirement patterns also promise that the demand for mathematics teachers will be even stronger later in the decade. The Program in Teaching Mathematics prepares you for teaching mathematics to students in grades 7 through 12. To qualify for provisional or initial certification in New York and most other states, you take the New York State Teacher Certification Examinations after graduation. While teaching, many of our graduates pursue a master’s degree that enables them to become mathematics specialists in a school district, managers of mathematics programs, and assistant principals in charge of mathematics curriculum. Examples of mathematics teaching positions in New York obtained by our graduates include the following: • Manhattan Center for Science and Mathematics • Manhattan Comprehensive Night and Day High School • Baruch College High School Other graduates have put their mathematics and teaching skills to use in business, industry, science, and government agencies.

“At NYU, I’ve learned to teach using examples from the everyday lives of my students. This practical approach grabs their attention and really motivates them. As a teacher, I know I can make a positive impact in the lives of young people.” ABEL LASTRA

56 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in teaching mathematics for grades 7-12 focuses on courses that satisfy requirements in liberal arts, the student’s major area of study, and the area of pedagogy. Students take at least 60 points in liberal arts courses. In the major area of study, students take calculus, linear algebra, geometry, statistics, and electives. The pedagogical core trains students in the techniques of teaching mathematics in secondary schools and in understanding the educational development of adolescents. The course of study incorporates a full range of experiences and observations culminating in two semesters of student teaching in public or independent school settings. Kenneth P. Goldberg Curriculum Coordinator (212) 998-5870

TEACHING MATHEMATICS, GRADES 7-12 Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

40 Points

Foreign Language

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Content Core

36 Points

Calculus I. V63.0021

4

Calculus II. V63.0022

4

Calculus III. V63.0023

4

Linear Algebra. V63.0024

4

4

Mathematics Elective. V63.••••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Geometry Course (e.g.,V63.0070, Transformations and Geometries)

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science I. V55.0201

4

Probability or Probability and Statistics Course (e.g.,V63.0030, Theory of Probability) either Advanced Calculus. V63.0025

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science II. V55.0301

4

Speech Communication.* E21.0033

4

Restricted Elective

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

Abstract Algebra. V63.0046 or Algebra I. V63.0043

4

Mathematics Elective. V63.••••

4

*May be exempt by examination—substitute will be a liberal arts elective.

Department of Teaching and Learning The Steinhardt School of Education New York University East Building, Suite 637 239 Greene Street New York, NY 10003-6674 • General education requirements, see the Morse Academic Plan, page 102.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

4

4

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Mathematics Education • 57

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY Common Pedagogical Core

33 Points

Specialized Pedagogical Core Teaching Secondary School Mathematics. E12.1043

20 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Human Development I: Early Adolescence. E63.0023

2

Teaching of Data Collection and Analysis, Grades 7-12. E12.1042 or Teaching of Algebra and Trigonometry, Grades 7-12. E12.1045 or Teaching of Geometry, Grades 7-12. E12.1046 or Teaching of Precalculus. E12.1047

Human Development II: Adolescence. E63.0024

2

Supervised Student Teaching of Mathematics I (Grades 7-12). E12.1077

5

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. E27.1030

4

Supervised Student Teaching of Mathematics II (Grades 7-12). E12.1078

8

Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology. E27.1050

4

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

Educating Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom. E75.1005

4

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

(Continued from page 55.)

Teacher Certification Requirements In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses

shown here reflect the changes approved by the New York State Education Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

4 3 3 3 3

• Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education • Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education • Science Education

58 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Music

Programs in Music PERFORMANCE, COMPOSITION, EDUCATION, BUSINESS, AND TECHNOLOGY

The Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions, which functions as the music conservatory for NYU, prepares music students to be the best performers, composers, educators, technologists, and business professionals they can be. But music professionals in the 21st century will be expected to be much more than specialists. Performers and composers need to be astute in business and be able to work with new technologies. Music educators and technologists must be competent performers and/or composers. Music business leaders must command the history and theory of music within the context of the world of interdisciplinary ideas. At the cutting edge of music training, traditional walls separating music majors have been opened in our department as we urge students to develop skills across programmatic lines. Intense and broadly based curricula within an internationally recognized university located in New York City uniquely prepare our students to succeed in the music professions of the 21st century.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Music • 59

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES MUSIC PERFORMANCE

A Varied and Rich Environment Established in 1925, the department is marked by energy, vitality, and innovation as a result of a vision of openness to cross-programmatic training. In our department, traditional, contemporary, and jazz performers along with composers and educators collaborate with music technologists on state-of-the-art computerized learning and recording equipment. Music business students assess and market those collaborative efforts. Departmental curricula in music performance, music theatre, film scoring, and educational theatre bring composers and performers together with choreographers, directors, actors, librettists, and filmmakers in exciting projects. Music education students study with a world-class artist faculty and perform, compose, and share learning strategies with music technologists, composers, and performance majors. Surrounded by the vibrant artistic energy of Greenwich Village, students enjoy cultural institutions, events, and artists that make New York City the artistic capital of the world. Our students graduate with a rich and diverse view and set of skills that prepare them for the music professions like no other place.

Distinguished Faculty We draw on the world’s greatest artists, music industry leaders, teachers, and scholars for our faculty: active Broadway professionals direct our music theatre workshops, Metropolitan Opera Company stars teach voice, New York Philharmonic members and Village Vanguard Orchestra members provide instrumental instruction, leaders in the music industry teach music business and technology courses, and renowned music theorists and historians teach our core music courses. For

example, Professor Robert Rowe has been a pioneer in “real-time,” interactive computer music performance and composition. An internationally recognized composer and scholar, his compositions are performed throughout the world and his two books on interactive music systems (MIT Press) are highly acclaimed. Professor Lawrence Ferrara is a pianist and an award-winning author of books and articles on music analysis, research methodologies, and the philosophy of music. A noted music copyright expert, he has been a consultant to every major record, music publishing, and motion picture company in the U.S. and has represented Andrew Lloyd Webber, Elton John, Paul McCartney, Billy Joel, Mariah Carey, Gloria Estefan, Marc Anthony, and many other artists in copyright infringement litigations in the U.S. and Europe. A new addition to our faculty is Professor Meg Bussert, a Broadway veteran, Tony Award nominee, and Theatre World Award winner. She has had leading roles in numerous Broadway productions and international tours and was nominated for the Cable Ace Award for her role on HBO as the Queen opposite Richard Harris in Camelot. Included in the artists she has worked with are Sir John Gielgud, Agnes DeMille, Michael Kidd, Debbie Reynolds, Richard Kiley, and Dick Van Dyke. She has given vocal concerts in major venues such as Carnegie Hall and is featured on numerous recordings including Phantom on RCA/BMG. She has a passion for teaching and advising students toward a successful music performance career. These are but a few examples of our distinguished faculty.

State-of-the-Art Facilities Our music facilities include the Frederick Loewe Theatre, the Black Box (Continued on page 60.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Graduates of our instrumental programs perform in major symphony orchestras and noted chamber groups, give solo and chamber music recitals, and play in Broadway show orchestras as well as opera and ballet orchestras.Vocalists have joined theatre and opera companies and perform in the casts of most of the shows on Broadway. Other graduates have found success as conductors and recordings artists with major labels. Our jazz alumni are among the busiest and most famous performers in the world, including jazz legend Wayne Shorter. MUSIC COMPOSITION

Music composition at NYU prepares you to compose in multiple styles. Graduates write music for orchestra, chamber groups, and solo instruments. Some have written music theatre works that have enjoyed regional and offBroadway runs while others (Cy Coleman and Betty Comden, to name just a few) have become preeminent in music theatre composition. Graduates often write for film (Alan Menken and Elmer Bernstein) or have become famous in popular song creation (Carole Bayer Sager). MUSIC EDUCATION

Graduates teach music in elementary and secondary schools and become private instrumental and vocal teachers. Music education students have completed graduate degrees in music and currently sit in major professorial and administrative positions throughout North America, Asia, and Australia. MUSIC BUSINESS

Music business prepares you for a career in the record industry, artist management, concert promotion, music merchandising, public relations, music publishing, and record/CD manufacturing and distribution. Recent graduates have gone on to work for Universal Music Group, BMG Entertainment, EMI Music Publishing, Sony Music, Elektra Entertainment, William Morris Agency, and many other music companies, some founded by alumni of the program. Many graduates continue their studies in law school or an M.B.A. program. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

Graduates have careers in recording engineering, production and postproduction, audio/video mastering, audio maintenance and repair, synthesizer programming, as well as multimedia and software development for major record companies, throughout the broadcast media, and major performance arenas. Graduates have positions with CBS Records, SBK Records,Verve Records, Sony, Billboard magazine, numerous other record and broadcast studios, and concert halls. Some have started their own recording studios and record companies while others have pursued very successful careers in performance and composition.

60 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in music business combines 40 points of liberal arts courses with 24 points in music history and literature, piano class and theory, and ear training. Students are also required to take 67 points in courses covering production and performance, economic and legal settings, music publishing, advertising, and promotion and concert management, to name a few. This also includes the core business studies in statistics, accounting, and marketing taken at NYU’s Stern School of Business.

MUSIC BUSINESS Freshmen Year Fall Semester

Sophomore Year

34 Points

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

MAJOR

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

Music History I: Medieval and Renaissance. E85.1067 2

Economic Principles I. V31.0001

4

Calculus/Algebra. V63.••••

4

The Economic and Legal Setting of the Music Industry. E85.1222

2

Music Publishing. E85.1700

2

Music Elective.* E85.••••

2

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Principles of Financial Accounting. C10.0001

4 4

MAJOR Theory I. E85.0035

2

Aural Comprehension in Music I. E85.0006

1

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation I. E85.0072

1

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Computer-Based Systems for Management Support. C20.0001

New Student Seminar. E03.0001

TOTAL

An internship in one of the many aspects of the music business is required.

TOTAL

Catherine Moore Program Director (212) 998-5427

LIBERAL ARTS

Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions The Steinhardt School of Education New York University Education Building, Suite 687 35 West Fourth Street New York, NY 10012-1172

33 Points

16

16

Spring Semester Spring Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

Economic Principles II. V31.0002

4

MAJOR

MAJOR Theory II. E85.0036

2

Aural Comprehension in Music II. E85.0007

1

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation II. E85.0073 1

4

Music History II: Baroque and Classical. E85.1068

2

Advertising and Promotion in the Music Industry. E85.1214

3

Marketing and Merchandising in the Music Industry. E85.1224 3

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

The Business Structure of the Music Industry. E85.0221

2

Statistics for Business Control and Regression and Forecasting Models. C22.0103

6

Electronic Music Synthesizers: Fundamental Techniques. E85.1037

3

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

TOTAL

TOTAL

18

17

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

(Continued from page 59.) Theatre, the Provincetown Playhouse, the Recital Room, recording studios, a percussion suite, a group piano facility, chamber music rooms, numerous private practice rooms, and the NordoffRobbins Music Therapy Clinic for advanced clinical practice.

Audition Audition requirements vary depending on your major area. It is expected that all music students will have acceptable musical skills and a commitment to

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

professional study in one of our music curricula. Students are encouraged to consult with the department for specific audition repertoire details.

A Choice of Major You may apply for admission to one of the following programs: 1. MUSIC PERFORMANCE Our Bachelor of Music in music performance provides highly accomplished students with the opportunity for intensive study with internationally

acclaimed performers. Private instruction is combined with studies in music theory and history, chamber music, performance practices, and practical experiences in solo and chamber recitals and concerts as well as fully staged music theatre and opera productions. The areas of specialization are jazz, piano, vocal (including music theatre and classical voice), and instrumental study. Students join our chamber orchestra, string and wind chamber groups, percussion ensembles, choirs, jazz ensembles, and concert jazz ensemble. Every week, master

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Music • 61

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Junior Year

36 Points

Senior Year

28 Points

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

Computer Music Synthesis: Fundamental Techniques. E85.1047

3

Music Elective.* E85.••••

2

Concert Management. E85.1226

3

Foundations of Contemporary Culture. V55.••••

4

MAJOR Music History III: 19th Century. E85.1077

2

Internship. E85.1042

3

Independent Study—Record Company. E85.1000 (Section 017)

1

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Foundations of Financial Markets. C15.0002

4

Production and Artists and Repertoire in the Music Industry. E85.1223 2

TOTAL

15

Music Elective.* E85.••••

2

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Guided Specialization.* •••.••••

3

LIBERAL ARTS

Introduction to Marketing. C55.0001

4

Performing Arts in Western Civilization. E85.1505

TOTAL

18

Spring Semester MAJOR

Spring Semester 4

MAJOR Music Elective.* E85.••••

2

Internship. E85.1042

3

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Music History IV: 20th Century. E85.1078

2

Business Policy. C40.0250

4

Independent Study—Record Company. E85.1000 (Section 017)

2

TOTAL

Internship. E85.1042

3

*See adviser regarding music elective and guided specialization course requirements applicable toward the degree.

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Guided Specialization.* •••.••••

3

Speech Communication. E21.0033

4

13

Management and Organizational Analysis. C50.0001 4

TOTAL

18

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

classes with renowned faculty and visiting artists provide opportunities for performance, interaction, and learning. Our performance students interact with leading figures in the traditional, jazz, and Broadway communities offering an unmatched opportunity for professional development and placement.

Study Traditional, Jazz, or Music Theatre Our traditional performance students have access to and study with members of the great organizations of New York

City, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, and the New York City Opera. NYU jazz students have been featured in the renowned jazz clubs of Greenwich Village, including the Blue Note. Faculty and visiting artists are drawn from internationally acclaimed jazz musicians living and performing in the city. Classical voice majors perform in opera scene programs and mainstage opera productions, working with renowned directors affiliated with major opera companies. Our music theatre studies are immersed in the

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excitement of New York City, the pulse and heartbeat of American music theatre. Music theatre students perform in fully staged productions viewed by producers, agents, and casting directors and are guided by directors, choreographers, conductors, designers, and guest artists who are active in the Broadway community. 2. MUSIC COMPOSITION Our Bachelor of Music in composition is for aspiring composers who wish to (Continued on page 62.)

62 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in teachers of vocal music, instrumental music, and piano for all grades combines courses in the liberal arts, the student’s major area of study, and the area of pedagogy. The student is required to take 60 points in liberal arts courses. The major area of study includes course work in a variety of subjects such as aural comprehension, music theory, and the development of music throughout history. Students also have the opportunity to hone their talents in voice, piano, or other instruments. The area of pedagogy provides training in the teaching of instrumental and vocal music to school children. The curriculum, which includes a full range of field experiences and observations, culminates in two semesters of student teaching in public or independent school settings. John Gilbert Program Director (212) 998-5778 Elaine Gates Undergraduate Adviser (212) 998-5778 Jeffrey Unger Undergraduate Adviser (212) 998-5244 Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions The Steinhardt School of Education New York University Education Building, Suite 777 35 West Fourth Street New York, NY 10012-1172

TEACHING MUSIC, ALL GRADES Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

60 Points

Foreign Language I

4

Foreign Language II

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences: Art and Mind. V55.0617

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Culture. V55.07••

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Quantitative Reasoning. V55.0101 or Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001

4

Content Core

49 Points

Aural Comprehension in Music I. E85.0006

1

Aural Comprehension in Music II. E85.0007

1

Aural Comprehension in Music III. E85.0008

1

Aural Comprehension in Music IV. E85.0009

1

Music Theory I. E85.0035

2

Music Theory II. E85.0036

2

Music Theory III. E85.0037

2

Music Theory IV. E85.0038

2

Music History I: Medieval and Renaissance. E85.1067

2

Music History II: Baroque and Classical. E85.1068

2

Music History III: 19th Century. E85.1077

2

Music History IV: 20th Century. E85.1078

2

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation I. E85.0072

1

4

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation II. E85.0073 1

Sound and Music. V85.0010

4

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation III. E85.0074 1

Natural Science II: Brain and Behavior. V55.0306 or Natural Science II:The Body: How It Works. V55.0309

4

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation IV. E85.0075 1

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Speech Communication. E21.0033

4

Liberal Arts Elective

4

Performing Arts in Western Civilization. E85.1505

4

4

• General education requirements, see the Morse Academic Plan, page 102.

(Continued from page 61.) be in an environment that encourages openness to new musical styles and structures, as well as traditional, multimedia (including film scoring), and music theatre composition. Our celebrated faculty are joined by visiting composers-in-residence to provide the finest composition training in traditional, electronic, and jazz styles. Private instruction is coupled with studies in music theory and history, orchestration, and arranging. Composition students are encouraged to pursue lessons in music performance as well. Each week, the Composers Forum features the works of renowned faculty and visiting composers with analysis by the composer. Composition students have

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

access to world-class undergraduate and graduate solo performance majors, vocal choirs, small and large chamber ensembles, over 20 jazz ensembles, a concert band, a music theatre repertory group, and an opera workshop for the reading of their works. Many of our composers’ works performed in our concerts have been reviewed by the New York media, recorded in our state-ofthe-art recording studios, and marketed on CDs we produce. We are committed to providing curricula, training, and facilities that support the development of individual choices and compositional styles. For example, many of our composition students choose to be involved with our music technology students and faculty, many

of whom are also active composers. Composition students have access to our state-of-the-art music technology facilities, curriculum, and faculty. By empowering students to make these choices, providing a faculty that continually supports and advises students, and making available cutting-edge facilities, our composition students are being prepared for successful careers in the 21st century. 3. MUSIC BUSINESS Building on a solid foundation in the liberal arts, our Bachelor of Music in music business combines courses in music theory and history with a strong grounding in the financial, economic, advertising, marketing, management,

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Music • 63

Teacher Certification Requirements

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY Woodwind Practicum. E85.0025

1

Brass Practicum. E85.0052

1

Upper String Practicum. E85.0026

1

Lower String Practicum. E85.0066

1

Percussion Practicum. E85.0027

1

Vocal and Choral Conducting Practicum. E85.0028 1 Fundamentals of Conducting. E85.0065

1

Applied specialization to be selected by advisement from Composition. E85.1021 16 or Wind or Percussion Instruments.* E85.0034,1034 or Stringed Instruments.* E85.0045,1045 or Private Piano.* E85.0056,1056 or Voice.* E85.0063,1063 Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Recital. E85.1092

1

Participation in Ensembles. E85.0•••

1

*0-level courses for freshmen and sophomores; 1000-level courses for juniors and seniors.

Common Pedagogical Core

11 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

Human Development II: Childhood. E63.0022

2

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

Specialized Pedagogical Core

14 Points

Teaching of Music in Junior and Senior High School. E85.1027

2

Teaching of Music in the Elementary Grades. E85.1048

2

Materials and Technology in Music and Music Education. E85.1054

2

Music for the Exceptional Child. E85.1204

2

Supervised Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary. E85.1141

3

Supervised Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary. E85.1145

3

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

and technical aspects of the music industry. There are four legs in the curriculum: music, business, music industry, and liberal arts courses. Music business students take their core music courses with other music majors and their core business courses at NYU’s Stern School of Business. The music industry courses are taught by industry professionals active in New York. These courses help to bridge the Stern School of Business courses with the music courses. Liberal arts courses may be taken at NYU’s College of Arts and Science. In addition, numerous elective courses in music technology, performance, composition, and education are also available in our department.

Right at the outset in your freshman year, and continuing through your senior year, hands-on experience is provided through Village Records, the Music Business Program’s own record company. Music business students are involved in all aspects of running a record company—selecting artists, producing and recording their music, and advertising and marketing a finished product. Each Wednesday, students attend program seminars at which faculty and guest speakers from the music world discuss career opportunities and issues. An advisory committee of leading professionals in the music industry advise our faculty on the expectations of the indus-

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try as well as job vacancies, making our curriculum cutting edge and our students prepared for job placement.

Internship Opportunities During the junior and senior years, all music business students are placed in internship settings with record companies, publishing houses, merchandising companies, digital recording studios, or concert management firms. Students are supervised by company officials who assess their progress. NYU faculty oversee internships through site visits and communication with site supervisors. Upon graduation from our department, many of our students are (Continued on page 64.)

In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses shown here reflect the changes approved by the New York State Education Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

64 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in music performance/piano studies combines 40-44 points of liberal arts courses with 24 required points in core courses that cover such areas as theory and ear training, music history, music literature, and conducting. Additionally, students in this performance program take 66 points in courses ranging from ensemble, collegium, and recital to advanced orchestration, electronic music, and computer music. Program Directors Ron Sadoff Piano and Instrumental (212) 998-5779 William Wesbrooks Vocal Performance: Classical Voice/ Music Theatre (212) 998-5739 Dinu Ghezzo Music Composition (212) 998-5438 Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions The Steinhardt School of Education New York University Education Building, Suite 777 35 West Fourth Street New York, NY 100121172 Special Note: Students studying other instruments or voice follow a similar curriculum.

MUSIC PERFORMANCE Freshman Year

32 Points

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Quantitative Reasoning. V55.01•• or Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science I. V55.02••

4

4

MAJOR

4

Piano or Organ. E85.0056

3

New York University Chamber Ensembles. E85.1080

1

Music Theory III. E85.0037

2

Aural Comprehension in Music III. E85.0008

1

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation III. E85.0074

1

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Music Specialization. E85.1•••

4

MAJOR New Student Seminar. E03.0001

Piano or Organ. E85.0056

3

New York University Chamber Ensembles. E85.1080

1

Music Theory I. E85.0035

2

Aural Comprehension in Music I. E85.0006

1

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation I. E85.0072

1

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

TOTAL

32 Points

16

TOTAL

16

Spring Semester LIBERAL ARTS

Spring Semester

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

LIBERAL ARTS

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

MAJOR

Liberal Arts Requirement: Foreign Language

4

Piano or Organ. E85.1056

3

New York University Chamber Ensembles. E85.1080

1

Music Theory IV. E85.0038

2

1

Aural Comprehension in Music IV. E85.0009

1

Music Theory II. E85.0036

2

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation IV. E85.0075 1

Aural Comprehension in Music II. E85.0007

1

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Introduction to Piano Literature and Repertoire. E85.1081

1

Music Specialization. E85.1•••

3

MAJOR Piano or Organ. E85.0056

3

New York University Chamber Ensembles. E85.1080

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation II. E85.0073 1 Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

TOTAL

16

TOTAL

16

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

(Continued from page 63.) offered positions in companies in which they had an internship. 4. MUSIC EDUCATION In our Bachelor of Science in music education, we seek to develop students’ awareness of the deep value of the arts and music as well as the importance of

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

sharing these values with others. Located in one of the most diverse urban centers in the world, our students experience a broad spectrum of music practices and pedagogies. Music education students have access to collaborative experiences in multimedia applications; traditional, multicultural, and jazz music performance and composition; music technology; arts therapies; dance

education; and educational theatre, all within our diverse department. Our students are equipped to teach music in elementary and secondary schools. We prepare our students to use a variety of approaches (including Kodaly, Orff, Dalcroze, and Suzuki) so that they can draw on the most effective means for the various tasks of

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Music • 65

STUDY OPTIONS:

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET

Music Theory and Composition Music Performance

Junior Year

35 Points

Senior Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

MAJOR

31 Points

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

MAJOR

Piano or Organ. E85.1056

Piano or Organ. E85.1056

3

New York University Chamber Ensembles. E85.1080

1

New York University Chamber Ensembles. E85.1080

1

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Music History III: 19th Century. E85.1077

2

Music History I: Medieval and Renaissance. E85.1067

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

2

Music Specialization. E85.1•••

6

Intermediate Conducting. E85.1093

2

Music Specialization. E85.1•••

6

18

16

Spring Semester Integrated Liberal Arts. E••.••••

LIBERAL ARTS Speech Communication. E21.0033

4

MAJOR Piano or Organ. E85.1056

3

New York University Chamber Ensembles. E85.1080

1

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Music History II: Baroque and Classical. E85.1068

2

Piano Literature and Repertoire I. E85.1096

1

Recital. E85.1092

1

Restricted Music Elective. E85.1•••

2

Music Specialization. E85.1•••

3

TOTAL

TOTAL

LIBERAL ARTS

Spring Semester

4

MAJOR Piano or Organ. E85.1056

3

New York University Chamber Ensembles. E85.1080

1

Music History IV: 20th Century. E85.1078

2

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Recital. E85.1092

1

Piano Literature and Repertoire II. E85.1097

1

Music Specialization. E85.1•••

3

TOTAL

15

17

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

teaching. A systematic balance among music theory and history, music education, and liberal arts courses with the continuous development of each student’s musicianship and artistry has marked our graduates as among the most prepared in the field.

Your Teaching Internship Two semesters of student teaching under the direct supervision of a certified music teacher in either a public or private school give our students handson experience. A member of our faculty visits each student teacher’s classroom three times each semester. Student teaching consists of one semester in an elementary school and one in a sec-

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

• Vocal Performance (classical voice or a sequence of courses in music theatre) • Instrumental

3

TOTAL

Performance students may elect one of the following programs:

ondary school. As a result of our reputation for thorough music teacher preparation, our students are highly sought after and many have assumed leadership roles in the profession. In the last several years, 100 percent of our graduates in music education who sought teaching positions in elementary and secondary schools obtained jobs. (Continued on page 66.)

• Piano All interested students are encouraged to contact the department for further information. Summer Study NYU offers a summer program in Pisa, Italy, to study music theory as well as to perform. Open to highly qualified seniors with special permission.

66 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in music technology combines 44 points of liberal arts courses with 37-38 points in music requirements that cover diverse topics from music history and literature to piano class and theory and ear training. Students in the Music Technology Program are also required to take 10-13 points in core classes, which include performance, fundamentals in computer and electronic music, as well as internship opportunities in many different aspects of the field and courses in specific areas of music technology. Students also choose 43-46 points in music technology specialization courses covering electronics technology, recording technology, MIDI technology, concert recording, and audio for video. Kenneth Peacock Program Director (212) 998-5431 Robert Rowe Associate Director (212) 998-5435 Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions The Steinhardt School of Education New York University Education Building, Suite 777 35 West Fourth Street New York, NY 10012-1172

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY Freshman Year

31 Points

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

Liberal Arts Requirement: Mathematics

Liberal Arts Requirement: Mathematics

4

MAJOR

MAJOR

32 Points

4

Music Theory III. E85.0037

2 1

New Student Seminar. E03.0001

Aural Comprehension in Music III. E85.0008

Music Theory I. E85.0035

2

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation III. E85.0074 1

Aural Comprehension in Music I. E85.0006

1

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation I. E85.0072

1

Recording Technology I. E85.1001

4

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Recording Technology I Laboratory. E85.1002

2

Electronics Technology I. E85.1817

3

Ensemble. E85.••••

1

Music History I: Medieval and Renaissance. E85.1067

2

TOTAL

16

TOTAL

16

Spring Semester

Spring Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Liberal Arts Requirement: Foreign Language

4

MAJOR

MAJOR Music Theory II. E85.0036

2

Aural Comprehension in Music II. E85.0007

1

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation II. E85.0073 1 Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

MIDI Technology I. E85.1007

3

Electronics Technology II. E85.1818

3

Ensemble. E85.••••

1

TOTAL

15

Music Theory IV. E85.0038

2

Aural Comprehension in Music IV. E85.0009

1

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation IV. E85.0075 1 Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Recording Technology II. E85.1003

4

Recording Technology II Laboratory. E85.1004

2

Music History II: Baroque and Classical. E85.1068

2

TOTAL

16

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

(Continued from page 65.) 5. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY Our Bachelor of Music in music technology prepares students for careers in recording engineering; production and postproduction; audio/video mastering; audio maintenance and repair; synthesizer programming; and multimedia and software development. As part of a large and active music and performing arts department, our technology program emphasizes the integration of musical and technical skills by maintaining close collaborations with the

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

performance and composition programs. Many of our music technology students are accomplished performers and composers who wish to broaden those skills with a degree in technology. Our unique position in a diversified department allows our technology students to continue performance and composition studies at the highest level while developing their technical skills. In addition to music performance, composition, music theory and history, and core technology courses, students may take elective courses in Analog and Digital Electronics; Recording Technol-

ogy; Audio for Video; Concert Recording; Electronic Music Synthesis; Computer Music Synthesis; Multimedia; and Film Scoring. We maintain 14 recording and computer music studios, including two recording suites; four Macintosh-based computer music laboratories; an A/V and film music editing studio; an analog synthesis studio; two research and development facilities that use Macintosh, IBM, and SGI computers; plus two full 24-bit Sonic Solutions digital editing and mastering systems. Digital audio hardware includes Sonic Solutions, Digidesign’s Pro Tools III,

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Music • 67

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Junior Year

33 Points

Senior Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Foundations of Contemporary Culture. V55.••••

4

MAJOR

32 Points

Speech Communication. E21.0033

4

MAJOR

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Fundamentals of Audio Techniques I: Studio Maintenance. E85.1008

3

Internship in Music Technology. E85.1820

3

Electronic Music Synthesizers: Fundamental Techniques. E85.1037

Guided Specialization. E85.••••

6

3

Music Elective.* E85.1•••

2

Musical Acoustics. E85.1035

3

Ensemble. E85.••••

1

Concert Recording I. E85.1011

2

TOTAL

Music History III: 19th Century. E85.1077

2

Spring Semester

TOTAL

17

16

LIBERAL ARTS

Spring Semester

Integrated Liberal Arts. E••.••••

4

LIBERAL ARTS

Liberal Arts Elective

4

4

MAJOR

MAJOR

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Collegium and Program Seminar. E85.0092

Internship in Music Technology. E85.1820

2

Musical Elective.* E85.••••

2

Guided Specialization. E85.••••

3

Audio for Video I. E85.1010

3

Music Elective.* E85.1•••

2

Computer Music Synthesis: Fundamental Techniques. E85.1047

Ensemble. E85.••••

1

3

Concert Recording II. E85.1012

2

Music History IV: 20th Century. E85.1078

2

Liberal Arts Requirement: Natural Science

TOTAL

16

TOTAL

16

*By advisement.

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Sound Accelerator and Audiomedia boards—for which NYU is a registered software developer—and several Motorola 56001 platforms. Music technology students have access to the art technology facilities at NYU, where they can gain training in advanced hardware platforms for computer music, graphics, animation, and multimedia. Students also learn programming using C, C++, MTML, Java, and Common Lisp as well as work in graphic environments such as Opcode’s MAX and Cycling 74’s Max/MSP. Sophisticated synthesis possibilities may be real-

ized through real-time digital signal processing, SMPTE handling, software synthesis such as MIT’s Csound, and an extensive collection of sampling, effects, and synthesis modules.

Internship Opportunities Music technology students take advantage of the unmatched resources in New York City through internships at leading record companies, recording studios, publishing firms, and other music industry enterprises. During the junior and senior years, internships are

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

established with companies that embrace our music technology students due to their thorough training. A site supervisor works with each intern and assesses his or her progress. In addition, NYU faculty oversee internships through site visits and regular communication with supervisors. The combination of a curriculum that ensures technical command, musicianship, and the academic standing of a great liberal arts university with hands-on experience through internships prepares our students for successful careers in the profession.

68 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Nursing

PROVIDING TOMORROW’S HEALTH CARE

A UNIQUE PROGRAM SETTING NEW STANDARDS

As health care becomes increasingly sophisticated and complex, nurses are assuming more diverse roles and increased leadership responsibilities. The baccalaureate degree is becoming the minimum educational requirement for professional nursing practice. Whether you are a beginning undergraduate, or a diploma or associate’s degree graduate with an R.N. license, or hold a bachelor’s degree in another field, we offer a program that will suit your educational needs. Our undergraduate program in the Division of Nursing is based on theory developed by Dr. Martha E. Rogers, who focused on patients as whole human beings. Under her leadership, we set new educational and professional standards and became one of the first institutions of higher learning to treat nursing science as a unique body of knowledge. Today, we are top ranked among nursing programs in the nation. And we are one of the few to offer bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree programs. Our programs are accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006; (800) 669-1656.

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The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Nursing • 69

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Distinguished Faculty We attract outstanding faculty, and you study with men and women who are at the forefront of advancements in nursing care, research, administration, and teaching. Engaged in ongoing professional practice— from newborn and infant care to terminal illness and gerontology—our faculty bring their knowledge and skills to the classroom. Our Division of Nursing is the home to several of this country’s leading researchers in the field of nursing. The division faculty has implemented the recommendations of the nationally recognized Boyer Commission report, Reinventing Undergraduate Education: A Blueprint for America’s Research Universities, with its provisions for hands-on research experiences for students. The premise of the commission was that students in a research university should not only expect a good general education but one that introduces inquiry-based learning. Our programs embody this high ideal. As a student in a research university that fosters an environment of critical thinking, you have the opportunity to strengthen your inquirybased education by working with faculty in their research and clinical practice initiatives. Students who have chosen this option have had varied and exciting experiences. There are many current projects that have potential for student contributions. Take advantage of what NYU’s Division of Nursing has to offer and make the most of your undergraduate nursing experience.

Graduates in Leadership Positions Our graduates are leaders in diverse academic and clinical settings, administrative posts, and successful private practices around the world. Some have received national recognition for research in education or in specialized areas of clinical interest.

Our Approach Is Humanistic Our goal is to prepare you to approach a patient as a total person. You are challenged to examine the social, emotional, and environmental context in which wellness and illness occur. In this way, you gain fresh perspectives on the nurse’s role in promoting the health potential of individuals, families, and communities.

An Integrated Process The program combines a strong university core of arts and science courses with nursing theory and clinical courses, independent study, and a progression of nursing science courses that follow the human developmental process from conception to death. You may select an elective course in fields such as computer science, foreign languages, thanatology, or independent study to further your intellectual growth or to expand your career possibilities.

Early Start in Clinical Experience Your clinical fieldwork begins in the sophomore year and continues until the completion of the program. (Continued on page 70.)

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F

ollowing graduation you may begin to practice as a graduate nurse. Upon successful completion of the New York State Licensure Examination, you begin practice as a registered nurse (R.N.). Nurses today perform increasingly sophisticated special care techniques in dialysis, emergency, surgical, coronary, and intensive care units.They may choose to specialize in such areas as pediatrics, obstetrics, geriatrics, mental health, acute care, or community health. New emphasis on outpatient and home care offers expanding opportunities for nurses to be the principal providers of these services, which have been limited or nonexistent in the past. Some nurses are undertaking independent ventures of their own, opening private practice, or starting agencies for high-technology home health care. Our graduates are in demand to fill responsible positions in health care facilities throughout the area and around the country. A small sampling in the New York area shows recent baccalaureate graduates accepting staff positions at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, Montefiore Medical Center, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Bellevue Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Mount Sinai-NYU Medical Center and Health System, New York HospitalCornell Medical Center, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center as well as positions as visiting nurses, hospice nurses, and public health nurses. Many graduates of our bachelor’s degree programs go on to study for master’s and doctoral degrees.

“NYU’s nursing program offered me clinical experience at leading hospitals throughout New York City and the opportunity to work with a broader spectrum of people than I ever could have if I had gone to school in my hometown.That was important to me.” DEIDRE GRIMES

70 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE FOUR-YEAR B.S. PROGRAM (132 POINTS) The four-year B.S. Program in Nursing offers a curriculum of liberal arts and nursing courses for high school graduates and transfer students from two- to four-year colleges. The curriculum combines 60 points of liberal arts courses with 53 required points in nursing courses that cover the care of individuals, families, and communities, as well as scientific and professional issues in nursing. Students are required to take 19 points in cognate courses that cover anatomy and physiology, chemistry, statistics, nutrition, and developmental psychology.

NURSING: FOUR-YEAR B.S. PROGRAM Freshman Year

35 Points

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001

4

Introduction to Psychology. V89.0001

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

SCIENCES

SCIENCES

4

Nutrition.* E33.0119 or E33.0060

3

Human Anatomy and Physiology I.* E14.1170

4

MAJOR

Introduction to Modern Chemistry.* V25.0002

5

Health Assessment.* E41.0239

2

Nursing Science I.* E41.0240

6

Altered Health Patterns.* E41.1435

3

MAJOR New Student Seminar. E03.0001

TOTAL

17

TOTAL

Spring Semester

Spring Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

18

Statistics. E10.1085 or E10.1995

3

Introduction to Sociology.* V93.0001

Students in this curriculum begin clinical fieldwork in the sophomore year and gain experience in maternal/child health, medical and surgical nursing care, community/psychiatric nursing, and nursing leadership.

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

SCIENCES

All students enrolled must maintain a cumulative grade point average and a nursing science grade average of 2.8. Cognate courses, all nursing courses, and other designated courses must be taken for a letter grade and are not open to students on a pass/fail basis. Please refer to the most recent Division of Nursing Student Handbook for the current academic policies.

TOTAL

Division of Nursing The Steinhardt School of Education New York University 246 Greene Street New York, NY 10003-6677 (212) 998-5300

36 Points

SCIENCES

4

Survey of Developmental Psychology.* E63.1271

3

Human Anatomy and Physiology II.* E14.1171

4

Principles of Organic Chemistry.* V25.0240

5

Microbiology.* E14.1023

4

MAJOR

MAJOR

Nursing Science II.* E41.1241

Theoretical and Research Bases of Nursing Practice.* E41.0120

3

TOTAL

6

18

18

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

(Continued from page 69.) You gain experience in services ranging from maternity and pediatrics to oncology and surgery at outstanding major medical centers. Our more than 100 placement sites include Tisch Hospital and Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (both of which are part of the Mount Sinai-NYU Medical Center and Health System), Beth Israel Medical Center, St. Vincent’s Hospital and Medical Center, New York City public health facilities, and various homes for the elderly as well as a variety of community agencies.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Student Activities You are encouraged to join the National Student Nurse Association and the Undergraduate Student Nurse Association, which are involved in many community service and career development activities. We also have a chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the national honor society for nursing.

Helping You Start Your Career Our annual Professional Nursing Day introduces you to various institutions and service agencies that are prospective employers. Graduates and other special guests speak at new student

seminars. Numerous hospitals offer clinical externships over the summer in which many of our students participate. Clinical externships are often important sources for future employment.

Clinical Study Regulations (Undergraduate) 1. The undergraduate program includes a number of laboratory courses as an integral part of the total educational program. 2. All students enrolling in a laboratory course(s) are required to have health examinations and clearance and health insurance coverage prior to

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Nursing • 71

STUDY OPTIONS

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Junior Year

35 Points

Senior Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Speech Communication. E21.0033

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

MAJOR Nursing Science III.* E41.1242

6

Nursing Pharmacotherapeutics.* E41.1436

3

TOTAL

Integrated Liberal Arts.*

26 Points

4

MAJOR Nursing Science V.* E41.1244

6

Approved Elective/Independent Study*

3

TOTAL

13

17

Spring Semester LIBERAL ARTS

Spring Semester

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Culture. V55.07••

LIBERAL ARTS Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

Foreign Language.

4

Nursing Science IV.* E41.1243

TOTAL

MAJOR Nursing Science VI.* E41.1245

6

Approved Elective/Independent Study*

3

TOTAL

MAJOR 6

18

*Required courses; must be taken for a letter grade.

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

beginning any laboratory course(s). In addition, clinical laboratory resources require certain testing and immunizations against communicable diseases before permitting students to use their facilities.

4

the program. Specific criteria must be met for a student to take two nursing science courses concurrently.

3. All students enrolling in a laboratory course(s) are required to have confirmation of current CPR certification.

6. All students enrolled in undergraduate nursing courses with a clinical laboratory are responsible for their own transportation to the agency. Assignments posted in the agency must be picked up by the student.

4. Students must receive a passing grade in the clinical laboratory and recitation in order to receive a passing grade in a nursing science course.

7. All students who are not registered nurses are required to take an NCLEX R.N. examination preparatory course during their senior year.

5. A student may not fail a supportive nursing or nursing science course more than two times and remain in

Please refer to the most recent Division of Nursing Student Handbook for the current academic policies.

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13

Independent Study: Students can enroll in independent study to explore specific topics or work on a special project.

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE: • Applied Psychological Studies • Nutrition and Food Studies

72 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

NURSING: B.S. PROGRAM FOR COLLEGE GRADUATES 15-Month Curriculum

53 Points

Fall Semester New Student Seminar.* E03.0001

Spring Semester Nursing Science II. E41.1241

6

Nursing Science III. E41.1242

6

Pharmacotherapeutics.* E41.1436

3 3

Theoretical and Research Bases of Nursing Practice.* E41.0120

3

Elective

Nursing Science I.* E41.0240

6

TOTAL

Health Assessment.* E41.0239

2

Altered Health Patterns* E41.1435

3

TOTAL

18

14

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

B.S. PROGRAM FOR COLLEGE GRADUATES The B.S. Program in Nursing offers several options for students who already have a baccalaureate degree in another field and want to make a career change to professional nursing. Students enter the program with

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advanced standing of 56 liberal arts credits from their previous course work. In addition, students must have met or completed, while matriculated at NYU, an additional 31 credit points of specific science and other prerequisite courses, such as Anatomy and Physiology (E14.1170,

4 points, and E41.1171, 4 points), Microbiology (E14.1023, 4 points), Chemistry (V25.0002, 5 points), Organic Chemistry (V25.0240, 5 points), Nutrition (E33.0119 or E33.0060, 3 points), Psychology (E63.1271, 3 points), and Statistics (E10.1085 or E10.1995, 3 points).

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Nursing • 73

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Second Fall Semester

Summer Semester Nursing Science IV. E41.1243

6

(plus optional nursing externship)

TOTAL

6

Nursing Science V. E41.1244

6

Nursing Science VI. E41.1245

6

Elective

3

TOTAL

15

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

A two-year, full-time nursing program is available to college graduates who have not completed prerequisite science courses. The B.S. Program in Nursing can also be completed in five years on a part-time, evening basis. Students also have the flexibility to begin the program on

either a full- or part-time basis and transfer to another schedule of study to complete their program. A 15-month curriculum is available to college graduates who have completed all prerequisites. The 15-month curriculum consists of 53 nursing points that cover the care of individ-

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

uals, families, and communities, as well as scientific and professional issues in nursing.

74 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE B.S. COURSE SEQUENCE FOR REGISTERED NURSES The B.S. Program in Nursing offers a sequence of courses for registered nurses, designed for either parttime or full-time study. Most students transfer 66 points from an associate’s degree program. The curriculum combines courses in the liberal arts with cognate courses in nutrition, organic chemistry, statistics, and other subjects. Students take 27-29 points in nursing science. Special Note: Please note that this sequence has been developed to accommodate students who are also working part or full time as registered nurses. This curriculum can be finished sooner if students are able to take 9 or 10 points per semester.

NURSING: B.S. PROGRAM COURSE SEQUENCE FOR REGISTERED NURSES WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE First Year

24 Points

Second Year

22 Points

Fall Semester

Fall Semester New Student Seminar. E03.0001

Introduction to Modern Chemistry. V25.0002

5

Liberal Arts Requirement

4

TOTAL

9

Spring Semester

Theoretical and Research Bases of Nursing Practice. E41.0120

3

Health Assessment. E41.0239

2

Nursing Elective

3

TOTAL

8

Spring Semester

Principles of Organic Chemistry. V25.0240

5

Liberal Arts Requirement

4

Nursing Care of Unitary Human Beings. E41.1267

3

TOTAL

9

Liberal Arts Requirement

4

TOTAL

7

Summer Session Nutrition. E33.0119 or E33.0060

3

Summer Session

Basic Statistics I. E16.1085 or E16.1995

3

Liberal Arts Requirement

4

TOTAL

6

Nursing Elective

3

TOTAL

7

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM AREAS Advanced Practice Nursing: Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner

Advanced Practice Nursing: Palliative Care Advanced Practice Nursing: Pediatrics

Advanced Practice Nursing: Adult Primary Care Nurse Practitioner

Midwifery

Advanced Practice Nursing: Geriatrics

Nursing Informatics

Advanced Practice: Holistic Nursing

Teaching of Nursing

Advanced Practice Nursing: Mental Health

Nursing Administration

DUAL DEGREE B.S./M.A. At New York University, the innovative dual degree baccalaureate and master’s degree programs enable all qualified generic, transfer, registered nurse, and second baccalaureate

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

students to complete a dual B.S./M.A. program in a reduced amount of time. The intent of the B.S./M.A. dual degree programs is to prepare highly qualified clinicians, teachers, and managers of nursing. During an

undergraduate student’s senior year, student may earn from 6-18 graduate points toward the baccalaureate degree, thereby allowing for point reduction of a student’s master’s degree course work.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Nursing • 75

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Third Year

19 Points

Fall Semester Community Nursing. E41.1253

3

Nursing Elective

3

Nursing Elective

3

TOTAL

9

Spring Semester Leadership in Nursing. E41.1254

3

Nursing Elective

3

Liberal Arts Requirement

4

TOTAL

10

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

To be eligible for consideration for admission to the dual degree program, students should have at least a 2.8 GPA. In order to continue into the M.A. component of the dual degree program, students will have to maintain a 3.0 GPA. Applicants to the dual degree programs should complete the undergraduate admission application and indicate in writing “Dual B.S./M.A. Nursing” under “anticipated college major” in Section 2—Filing Status of the undergraduate application. In addition, all dual B.S./M.A. applicants will interview with a master’s program faculty member. Once admitted, students are expected to complete requirements for both degrees.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

76 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Nutrition and Food Studies

A FIELD OF INTENSE PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL INTEREST

AN EXCITING NEW PROGRAM

Food and nutrition are challenging fields of study for personal as well as professional reasons. Everyone eats and drinks to stay fit and healthy and also to enjoy the social and cultural experiences associated with food. Food choices vary according to taste, of course, but also to family background and economic status, and such factors as geography, climate, marketing and trade practices, and social trends. These fields also encompass some of the most critically important—and hotly debated—issues affecting modern society, among them world hunger and problems related to the safety, bioengineering, and the globalization of food. This program helps you understand the significance of all of these factors so you are well prepared for an almost limitless variety of food and nutrition careers. This unique program allows you to combine your enjoyment of food with an interest in health, culture, or business. Its strengths are an unusually strong foundation in liberal arts; core lecture and laboratory courses that explore and integrate food studies, nutrition, and management; a concentration in one of three areas of professional study; and extensive opportunities for elective courses and

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Nutrition and Food Studies • 77

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

internships designed to help you apply your knowledge to meet your own interests and career goals.

Unusually Varied Career Choices Food is a $900 billion industry, half of all meals are eaten outside the home, and 30 percent of all new food products are designed to meet nutritional goals. Career opportunities in food-related professions are expanding rapidly. Employers increasingly seek university graduates with educational experience in liberal arts, food, nutrition, and management. You can use your education in nutrition and food studies as a step to becoming a nutritionist or dietitian, food or restaurant manager, food reporter or editor, advertising or marketing specialist, equipment designer or distributor, catering manager, consultant, or teacher or professor in a great variety of institutional, corporate, academic, or other professional settings.

The Advantages of Our Location As an international capital of health care and one of the world’s leading restaurant, catering, magazine, and media centers, New York City provides vast resources for our program. Nutrition and food professionals from outstanding local academic and business centers advise us about our curriculum, teach our courses, and supervise our internship placements. Our student nutrition health advocates, food managers, and food professions clubs take full advantage of our location through field trips and invited speakers. You learn the basics of food preparation and management in our department’s stateof-the-art foods laboratory facility.

The Liberal Arts Foundation Careers in foods and nutrition call for writing, language, communication, and social skills as well as technical knowledge. A great strength of this program is that you select at least half your credits from the vast array of humanities and social, behavioral, and natural science courses offered by NYU’s College of Arts and Science.

The Nutrition and Food Studies Core Students in all concentrations take courses in basic foods, food production, food management, food sanitation, nutrition, and food and society as an introduction to the full spectrum of ways in which food and nutrition intersect with society. You learn about the nutrient value of food, eating behavior, cultural determinants of food intake, food marketing and personnel management, and many other fascinating aspects of this field.

NUTRITION AND DIETETICS

The concentration in nutrition and dietetics prepares you for entry-level positions such as assisting dietitians or nutritionists who work as consultants, writers, or consumer relations specialists. If, after graduation, you meet further requirements and become a registered dietitian, your career choices expand considerably.You will qualify for higher positions in clinical or management dietetics in hospitals, nursing homes, community nutrition programs, businesses, and other types of agencies. Our graduates have gone on to the following: • Nutrition educators in schools, colleges, and community agencies • Clinical dietitians or managers of nutrition programs in hospitals, nursing homes, and schools • Private consultants for patients with chronic conditions or for corporate wellness programs • Members of clinical specialty teams in pediatrics, family medicine, surgery, critical care medicine, and other services • Staff members of private agencies, health departments, and federal agencies • Food writers, editors, and media consultants • Product development staff in food companies

FOOD AND RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT

A Choice of Concentration Nutrition and food studies lets you tailor your education to your own career goals. You focus your studies by selecting one of three areas of concentration: nutrition and dietetics, food and restaurant management, or food studies. These areas are described in “Your Career Opportunities” on this page.

A Vast Choice of Internships Along with your academic courses, you apply your knowledge in supervised internship placements (Continued on page 78.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The need for university-prepared professionals in the rapidly expanding field of food and restaurant management continues to increase. As noted earlier, the restaurant and food service industries generate $900 billion in yearly sales and employ more than 12 million people. More than half of all meals are consumed outside the home, and one out of every four retail outlets serves food or drinks.The number of positions in the food industry is expected to increase by 25 to 30 percent within the next 10 years. Public interest in health and fitness is reflected in the proliferation of recreation facilities, health clubs, spas, and resorts where there is a growing demand for food management professionals.

(Continued on page 79.)

78 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

(Continued from page 77.) arranged to meet your specific area of interest and to further your career goals. Faculty work with students to locate challenging internships selected from New York City’s extensive professional resources: hospitals and health centers, restaurants, hotels, newspapers, magazines, consulting firms, food companies, and community agencies. Our internship courses help you to develop the professional skills you need to prepare your résumé and to interview for jobs and often lead to future employment.

Helping You Start Your Career Employers in the metropolitan area frequently ask our faculty for job referrals, and the department maintains a bulletin board that lists current positions. The NYU Office of Career Services provides many resources for finding employment. Many of our graduates inform us of job openings, provide career guidance for our students, and participate in the popular Food and Nutrition Career Day that we sponsor every other year.

Student Activities We encourage our students to join the department’s nutrition or food clubs, which sponsor events, field trips, and speakers, and to join and participate in local, regional, and national professional organizations such as the American Dietetic Association, the Greater New York Dietetic Association, the Association for the Study of Food and Society, and the James Beard Foundation. Such organizations provide technical information, career guidance, or scholarships for students in our program.

Nutrition and Dietetics A CHALLENGING FIELD Nutrition and dietetics meets national needs for professionals with a thorough understanding of human nutritional needs in health and illness and of ways to provide healthful diets through food service systems. In a dynamic and expanding field, nutritionists and dietitians are working in health care, business, government service, and their own private practices. Hospitals, nursing homes, the food industry, restaurants, schools, and community programs urgently need nutritional professionals with up-to-date knowledge and experience. A CHALLENGING PROGRAM Students learn basic, community, clinical, and administrative dietetics, as well as food service management and food science. Courses in nutrition assessment, diet modification, computer applications, and research help students to develop analytical and decision-making skills critical to dietetic practice. Practicing dietitians from outstanding medical centers teach our clinical nutrition courses and provide guest lectures on the most interesting and current topics in the field. INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES During your senior year, you do fieldwork in hospital dietetics, helping patients and clients to meet their special nutritional needs under the close supervision of registered dietitians. Recent settings for such internships have included the St. Vincent’s Hospital and Medical Center, the Mount Sinai-NYU Medical Center and Health System, the Hospital for Joint Diseases, the

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

New York Foundling Hospital in Manhattan, Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, and the Bronx Veterans Affairs Medical Center. BECOMING A REGISTERED DIETITIAN Most students in this area of concentration decide to continue their studies to obtain credentials as a registered dietitian (R.D.). This credential qualifies students for higher positions and a greater variety of career choices. The nutrition and dietetics concentration provides the courses approved by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) that you need to become eligible to obtain the R.D. After you graduate, you will also need to complete an accredited internship and pass the R.D. examination. Our department offers two graduate options for dietetic internship. Both enable you to earn a master’s degree, which is held by more than half of this country’s dietitians, and both are accredited by the ADA. They are as follows: (1) The NYU Dietetic Internship You may apply for this internship, which provides clinical dietetics training at one of more than 20 hospitals and health care facilities affiliated with NYU. Upon completion, you are eligible to take the R.D. examination. If you choose to continue graduate studies, you will need only 21 additional credits to complete a Master of Science degree in nutrition and dietetics: clinical nutrition. (2) The Bronx VAMC Dietetic Internship/NYU Master’s Program This highly selective program is offered by the Bronx Veterans Affairs

Medical Center in affiliation with the NYU Department of Nutrition and Food Studies. After 18 months of clinical dietetics practice and course work, you earn a Master of Science degree in nutrition and dietetics: clinical nutrition and are eligible to take the R.D. examination. Judith A. Gilbride Director, Nutrition and Dietetics Programs (212) 998-5590

Food and Restaurant Management A FAST-GROWING INDUSTRY As Americans eat more and more of their meals outside the home, food and restaurant management has become among the fastest growing fields in the United States and around the world. As an NYU student, you have unmatched access to food resources in New York City—internationally known restaurants, catering, and take-out places; food service operations in businesses, industries, hotels, airlines, hospitals, clubs, and spas; and food consulting, public relations, and marketing enterprises. A COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM Concentration courses in beverage management, food service supervision, accounting and financial management, marketing, and law prepare you for the wide range of opportunities in this field. Our cooperative education program helps you apply management theory to on-the-job experience. You gain skills, income, and academic credits while working in famous restaurants and outstanding business sites.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Nutrition and Food Studies • 79

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

FOOD AND RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT (Continued from page 77.)

This area of concentration prepares you for entry-level management positions in restaurants, corporations, and other places where food is produced, prepared, sold, and marketed. Recent graduates now hold the following positions: • Assistant food and beverage manager, Waldorf-Astoria • Assistant restaurant manager, Ark Management • Executive steward, Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza • Sales associate, D’Artagnan Foods • Assistant restaurant consultant, Loews’ Hotels FOOD STUDIES

Recent placements have included the Tribeca Grill, Hudson River Café, Ark Management, Restaurant Associates, and many others. Well-known industry professionals help teach our courses and provide career advice and placement opportunities. You study with a diverse student population from across the United States and countries throughout the world and learn from them about international career opportunities.

Food Studies A UNIQUE AND INNOVATIVE PROGRAM This area of concentration focuses on the scholarly study of food, particularly its cultural and social dimensions. To our knowledge, this is the only undergraduate program offering this focus outside of a culinary institution, and the only one to build on so strong a foundation in liberal arts and to be accredited.

ence, food in the arts, and communications. Students may choose from a wide variety of theoretical and hands-on elective courses, such as catering, international nutrition, food demonstrations, international foods, and food photography. Courses are taught by outstanding NYU faculty as well as by highly qualified professionals who share their knowledge and experience, provide career advice, and supervise internships. Internships are available in every imaginable aspect of food fields and are developed through consultation with faculty to meet individual interests and goals.

A FASCINATING COURSE OF STUDY Concentration courses cover food issues of contemporary societies, essentials of cuisine, beverage management systems, foods, food sci-

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The food studies concentration prepares graduates to enter food professions where knowledge of food and beverage, the use of food and food ingredients, and the role of food in society are at a premium.The program also prepares students for a variety of academic programs in humanities, social and behavioral science, and management fields. Although this is a new field, we expect graduates to obtain entry-level positions as follows: • Food writers • Food stylists • Food photographers • Caterers • Cooks or cook managers • Food or beverage directors • Assistants to food operations, marketing, and design directors • Sales associates • Research assistants • Consultants • Test kitchen assistants • Food product developers • Food brokers

80 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM Depending on the specific area of concentration selected, the 128-point curriculum in nutrition and food studies requires 60 points of liberal arts courses, 15 points of core courses, 28 to 36 points of specialization courses in an area of concentration, and the remaining 17 to 26 points as electives. Core courses taken by all students in the program include food science, food production and management, food management theory, nutrition, food sanitation, and food and society. Specialization and elective courses are discussed under each area of concentration.

NUTRITION AND FOOD STUDIES

Amy L. Bentley Director of Undergraduate Study (212) 998-5580 Fax: (212) 995-4194 [emailprotected]

Speech Communication. E21.0033

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Natural Science Course

4

Marion Nestle Department Chair (212) 998-5580 Fax: (212) 995-4194

Concentration Course

Department of Nutrition and Food Studies The Steinhardt School of Education New York University Education Building, 10th Floor 35 West Fourth Street New York, NY 10012-1172

Freshman Year

32 Points

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

32 Points

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Introduction to Modern Chemistry. V25.0002

5

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

MAJOR New Student Seminar. E03.0001 Introduction to Foods and Food Science I. E33.0085 Nutrition and Health. E33.0119

TOTAL

MAJOR Food Production and Management. E33.1052

3

3

Concentration Course

6

3

TOTAL

15

17

Spring Semester

Spring Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Liberal Arts Requirement: Foreign Language

4

Natural Science Course

4

MAJOR 5

TOTAL

17

MAJOR Food Microbiology and Sanitation: Safety Certification. E33.1048

1

Food Management Theory. E33.0091

3

Concentration Course

3

TOTAL

15

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102.

Concentration Courses

Nutritional Biochemistry E33.1064 ..(3)

Nutrition and Dietetics Diet Assessment and Planning E33.0060 ........................................(3)

Current Research in Nutrition E33.1117 ........................................(2)

Educational Psychology E63.1014 ..(2) or Learning V89.0020 .........................(4)

Food Science and Technology E33.1184 ........................................(3) Clinical Nutrition Assessment and Intervention E33.1185 ...................(3) Fieldwork E33.1198 .......................(4)

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service I E33.1017 ........................ (1)

Community Nutrition E33.1209 ...(3)

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service II E33.1018 ....................... (1)

Nutrition and the Life Cycle E33.1269 ...............................(3)

Food Microbiology and Sanitation E33.1023 ......................(3)

Food and Restaurant Management Food Issues of Contemporary Societies E33.0071 .........................(3)

Human Anatomy and Physiology E14.1035..........................................(3)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service I E33.1017 ........................ (1)

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service II E33.1018 ....................... (1) Computers in Nutrition and Food Service IV E33.1020 ...................... (1) Food Microbiology and Sanitation E33.1023 ........................................(3) Beverages E33.1025 .......................(3) Food Service Supervision and Training E33.1039 .........................(3) Internship in Food Studies and Food Management E33.1056 .................(3) Food Service Accounting E33.1101 ........................................(3) Food Finance E33.1188 .................(3) Food Service Marketing E33.1189 ........................................(3)

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Nutrition and Food Studies • 81

STUDY OPTIONS:

SAMPLE CURRICULUM WORKSHEET Junior Year

32 Points

Senior Year

Fall Semester

Fall Semester

LIBERAL ARTS

LIBERAL ARTS

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Science. V55.06••

4

Restricted Elective

3

32-33 Points

Liberal Arts Elective

4

MAJOR

Food and Society. E33.1051

2

Fieldwork. E33.1198 or Internship in Food Studies and Food Management. E33.1056

Concentration Course

6

Restricted Elective

3

Concentration Course

5

MAJOR

TOTAL

15

Spring Semester

TOTAL

LIBERAL ARTS

Spring Semester

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Culture. V55.07••

4

Liberal Arts Elective

4

MAJOR

3

15-16

LIBERAL ARTS Food and Nutrition in a Global Society. E33.1180

4

MAJOR

Restricted Elective

3

Concentration Course

6

TOTAL

4

17

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service I. E33.1017

1

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service II. E33.1018

1

Restricted Elective

8

Concentration Course

3

TOTAL

17

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Food Studies Food Issues of Contemporary Societies E33.0071 ........................................(3)

International Foods E33.1183 .......(1)

International Foods E33.1183 ...... (1)

Food Science and Technology E33.1184 ........................................(3)

International Nutrition E33.1187 (1)

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service I E33.1017 ........................ (1)

Food in the Arts E33.1204 .............(2)

Food Preparation Techniques: Photography E33.1200 ................. (1)

Advanced Foods E33.1217 ..........(1-3)

Food in the Arts E33.1204 ............ (2) Food Photography E33.1271 ........ (1)

Beverages E33.1025 .......................(3)

Elective Courses, by Advisement Independent Study E33.1000 .....(1-6)

Internship in Food Studies and Food Management E33.1056 .................(3)

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service E33.1019 ........................... (1)

Communications Workshop in Foods and Nutrition E33.1130 .................(2)

Food Laws and Regulations E33.1109 ........................................(3)

Essentials of Cuisine E33.1135 ...(2-3)

Food Demonstrations E33.1137 .................................... (1-3)

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service II E33.1018 ....................... (1)

Food Events: Planning and Catering E33.1143 ......................................(1-3)

Food Events: Planning and Catering E33.1143 .................................... (1-3)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Management and Organizational Analysis C50.0001 ......................... (4) Basic Statistics I E16.1085 ............ (3) Health Assessment E41.0239 ........ (2) Counseling Interview E63.1012 ... (3) E33.•••• and other electives, particularly in the College of Arts and Science, by advisement.

Areas of Concentration: Students select an area of concentration from the following three choices: (1) nutrition and dietetics, (2) food and restaurant management, and (3) food studies. Independent Study: Students can receive credit for independent study in advanced course work, field experience, or special projects that provide further education in specific areas of interest, under the supervision of a faculty adviser. Minor: Students in other fields may minor in nutrition and food studies by taking 16 points of core courses in food science, food production and management, food management theory, nutrition, food sanitation, and foodways.

82 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Science Education Degree Programs in Teaching Biology • Chemistry • Earth Science • Physics

Certification Programs in Science Education Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics (Grades 7 through 12) HELPING OTHERS TO EXPLORE THE WONDERS OF SCIENCE

A PROGRAM IN THE NATIONAL FOREFRONT

Every day, science expands its profound role in our lives—for instance, through biotechnology, space exploration, medical research, and ecological discoveries. The goal of the science teacher is to stimulate in students’ minds deep interest in understanding the world, to help them experience the challenge of exploring natural phenomena on this planet and beyond, and to encourage aptitudes that may lead to careers in science: teaching, research, or professional practice. Since their inception, the Bachelor of Science Programs in Teaching Science, Grades 7-12, in the Department of Teaching and Learning, has been a leader in the nationwide movement in teacher education to stimulate the study of science, technology, and society in the high schools. Today, we supplement our emphasis on science, technology, and society with a focus on training teachers to adapt

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Science Education • 83

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

curricula to multicultural environments, especially in urban areas, so that all students feel more at home in studying science.

Science, Education, and Liberal Arts You prepare to teach either biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics. All science courses are taken in NYU’s College of Arts and Science, along with humanities and social science courses required for the liberal arts core. In The Steinhardt School of Education, you take courses in methods for teaching science and the development of curriculum for junior and senior high school students. You study microcomputer applications to teaching science and instructional techniques for attracting more women and minorities to science. The teaching strategies that you learn are designed to help make your own students feel more comfortable with scientific concepts and practices.

Your Teaching Internship To ensure continuity between the classroom and the real teaching world, you complete a semester of observation and student teaching in an urban public or independent school selected for its diversity of student population. You are supervised by experienced teachers of science and by our own faculty. Recent placements, for example, have been in the School of the Future and High School for Environmental Science in Manhattan, Manhattan Center for Science and Mathematics, Friends Seminary on Manhattan’s East Side, and Boys and Girls High School in Brooklyn.

Helping You Start Your Career Through the New York City Alliance for Science—our local network with science teachers—we learn about job openings in the schools. And student teaching placements frequently lead to full-time employment upon graduation.

Small Program, Constant Feedback Our program is small, permitting one-to-one academic and professional counseling from our faculty. We also use peer feedback and evaluation; student teaching is videotaped for critique sessions in which students review and discuss each other’s techniques and lesson plans.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

P

rospects for our graduates are excellent as secondary school enrollments rise and public interest in science education increases.To qualify for provisional or initial certification in New York State, you take the New York State Teacher Certification Examinations.These examinations have several parts, which may be taken during your course of study. Please see your adviser for more detailed information. Our graduates are also successful in applying the knowledge and skills they gain in the program to pursue employment in industry, publishing, and research or at institutions placing special emphasis on making science accessible to the general public—in museums, zoos, and environmental centers, for example. A sampling of teaching jobs accepted by recent graduates include the following: • Science teacher at the School of the Future, High School for Environmental Science, and Friends Seminary in Manhattan • Science artist and illustrator of children’s books • Research technician, Mount Sinai-NYU Medical Center and Health System • Instructors at museums, halls of science, and zoos

84 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in science education, grades 7-12, offers students a choice of program of study in biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics. These indepth content core classes, directing the student’s focus of scientific study, are combined with a pedagogical foundation that exposes students to the methods for teaching science and the development of curricula for junior and high school students. The student’s program of study culminates in two semesters of teaching opportunities in a public or independent school setting.

SCIENCE EDUCATION: TEACHING BIOLOGY, GRADES 7-12

(For Freshman and Sophomore Transfer Students)

Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

32 Points

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foreign Language I

4

Speech Communication.* E21.0033

4

Calculus I. V63.0021

4

Content Core

55 Points

Principles of Biology I and II. V23.0011/0012

8

General Chemistry I and II. V25.0101/0102

8

Organic Chemistry I. V25.0243

4

Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. V25.0245

2

Molecular and Cell Biology I and II. V23.0021/0022 8 Introduction to Laboratory Techniques. V25.0103

2

Introduction to Quantitative Analysis. V25.0104

2

General Physics I. V85.0011

5

Four biology courses by advisement: V23.0036

16

*May be exempt by examination—substitute will be a liberal arts elective.

Pamela Fraser-Abder Curriculum Coordinator (212) 998-5208 Department of Teaching and Learning The Steinhardt School of Education New York University East Building, Suite 637 239 Greene Street New York, NY 10003-6674

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102. The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

SCIENCE EDUCATION: TEACHING CHEMISTRY, GRADES 7-12

(For Freshman and Sophomore Transfer Students)

Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

32 Points

Content Core

54 Points

General Chemistry I and II. V25.0101/0102

8

4

Organic Chemistry I and II. V25.0243/0244

8

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and II. V25.0245/0246

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

Introduction to Laboratory Techniques. V25.0103

2

4

Introduction to Quantitative Analysis. V25.0104

2

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

General Physics I and II. V85.0011/0012

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Calculus II. V63.0022

4

Foreign Language I

4

Physical Chemistry I and II. V25.0651/0652

8

Speech Communications.* E21.0033

4

Experimental Methods. V25.0661

4

Calculus I. V63.0021

4

One chemistry course (by advisement)

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

*May be exempt by examination—substitute will be a liberal arts elective.

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102. The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

10

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Science Education • 85

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY Common Pedagogical Core

33 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Education of Students with Disabilities. E75.1005

4

Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology. E27.1050

4

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

Specialized Pedagogical Core

1

12 Points

Teaching of Science: Intermediate and High School. E14.1039

4

Supervised Student Teaching of Science in Middle School. E14.1149

4

Supervised Student Teaching of Science in High School. E14.1046

4

Human Development I: Early Adolescence. E63.0023 2 Human Development II: Adolescence. E63.0024

2

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. E27.1030

4

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE: • Nursing • Nutrition and Dietetics

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY Common Pedagogical Core

33 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

Specialized Pedagogical Core

12 Points

Teaching of Science: Intermediate and High School. E14.1039

4

4

Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology. E27.1050

Supervised Student Teaching of Science in Middle School. E14.1149

4

4

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

Supervised Student Teaching of Science in High School. E14.1046

4

Education of Students with Disabilities. E75.1005

Human Development I: Early Adolescence. E63.0023 2

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

Human Development II: Adolescence. E63.0024

2

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. E27.1030

4

• Mathematics Education • Nursing • Nutrition and Dietetics

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

86 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

SCIENCE EDUCATION: TEACHING EARTH SCIENCE, GRADES 7-12

(For Freshman and Sophomore Transfer Students)

Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

28 Points

Content Core

56 Points

Principles of Biology I and II. V23.0011/0012

8

General Chemistry I and II. V25.0101/0102

8

Evolution of the Earth. V49.0001

4

Earth System Science. V49.0010

4

4

Whole Earth Science: The Global Environment. V49.0012

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

Earth and Life History. V49.0064

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Geology of National Parks. V49.0200

4

Foreign Language I

4

Field Geology. V49.0705

4

Speech Communication.* E21.0033

4

Cities and Geology. V49.0330

4

Limits of the Earth. V49.0875

4

Continental Drift, Seafloor Spreading, and Plate Tectonics. V49.0440

4

Vertebrate Evolution. V23.0013

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

*May be exempt by examination—substitute will be a liberal arts elective.

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102. The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

SCIENCE EDUCATION: TEACHING PHYSICS, GRADES 7-12

(For Freshman and Sophomore Transfer Students)

Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

32 Points

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences. V55.06••

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foreign Language I

4

Speech Communication.* E21.0033

4

Calculus I. V63.0021

4

Content Core Physics I and II. V85.0100/0101

10

Physics III. V85.0102

5

Calculus II. V63.0022

4

Calculus III. V63.0023

4

Mathematical Physics. V85.0106

3

Modern Physics I and II. V85.0103/0104

10

Electricity and Magnetism I and II. V85.0131/0132

6

Experimental Physics. V85.0112

3

Two physics courses by advisement

8

*May be exempt by examination—substitute will be a liberal arts elective.

• Liberal arts requirements, see page 102. The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

53 Points

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Science Education • 87

Teacher Certification Requirements

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY Common Pedagogical Core

33 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

Specialized Pedagogical Core

12 Points

Teaching of Science: Intermediate and High School. E14.1039

4

4

Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology. E27.1050

Supervised Student Teaching in Middle School. E14.1149

4

4

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

Supervised Student Teaching in High School. E14.1046

4

Education of Students with Disabilities. E75.1005

Human Development I: Early Adolescence. E63.0023

2

Human Development II: Adolescence. E63.0024

2

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. E27.1030

4

• Mathematics Education • Nursing • Nutrition and Dietetics

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY Common Pedagogical Core

33 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

Specialized Pedagogical Core

12 Points

Teaching of Science: Intermediate and High School. E14.1039

4

4

Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology. E27.1050

Supervised Student Teaching in Middle School. E14.1149

4

4

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

Supervised Student Teaching in High School. E14.1046

4

Education of Students with Disabilities. E75.1005

Human Development I: Early Adolescence. E63.0023

2

Human Development II: Adolescence. E63.0024

2

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. E27.1030

4

• Mathematics Education • Nursing

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses shown here reflect the changes approved by the New York State Education Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

88 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Social Studies Education

Certification Program in Social Studies Education (Grades 7 through 12) A NEW GENERATION OF TEACHERS

Social studies classes should be the locus of middle and high school student learning about American society and the world, past and present. It is in social studies that students are supposed to prepare for their role as citizens by studying history, economics, geography, and government. The opportunities for exciting learning in social studies seem unlimited, since students can grapple with the great issues of our world: war and peace; democracy versus autocracy; poverty; racial, class, and sexual inequality; prejudice; technological change; and corporate economic dominance. Our Program in Teaching Social Studies, Grades 7-12, is dedicated to producing a new generation of middle and high school teachers who are equipped to take students beyond the world of bland textbooks and multiple choice tests and to generate real student interest in history, the social sciences, and the challenges of active citizenship.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Social Studies Education • 89

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Strong Liberal Arts Orientation To teach social studies effectively, you have to start with a strong mastery of the content areas that students will be exploring with you. Since history is the core discipline in the social studies curriculum of New York and many other states, our program includes extensive historical study, which will introduce you to global and U.S. history, and then enable you to develop an area of specialization, such as modern Europe, in which you complete advanced course work and a research seminar (in small class settings). To build a cross-disciplinary understanding of society and civilization, you take a wide range of courses in the humanities, social sciences, foreign language, the natural sciences, and mathematics.

Educational Emphasis The curriculum’s course work in educational methods and theory builds on this strong foundation in the social sciences and the humanities. As you develop expertise, for example, in American history, your education classes examine ways that you can use your knowledge to teach this subject effectively to young students. Social studies courses will familiarize you with ways to integrate history, literature, and the arts and how to involve students in inquiry-based history workshops, which engage them in analyzing historical controversies and primary sources. You will learn how community studies and local history can involve students in major research projects that relate to their own lives and neighborhoods and encounter the latest programs to foster citizenship and participatory democracy via service learning. You will be exposed

to research on how adolescents and children learn and study the most innovative methods and materials being used in high school and middle school social studies classes. Other education course work will teach you how to deal with student reading and writing problems and ensure that you enter teaching with a strong grasp of the special education and educational policy issues that affect schooling.

The City as a Social Studies Laboratory New York City is the home of some of the leading innovators in social studies education, and our social studies program involves these reformers in its course work. You will learn from them about projects that have succeeded in evoking student interest in politics and community studies, such as the Educational Video Center, which teaches high school students how to make documentary films about local issues. Our students have also explored ways that new technologies can be used to bring history to life by developing primary source activities for the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute’s New Deal Web site. Even before you student teach, you will observe middle and high school students debating social studies questions, including those who participate in The Constitution Works, which involves students in mock trials on constitutional issues. Our program has been a source of innovation on the New York educational scene and has involved our students in designing curriculum for our urban school partners—so that, instead of merely completing course assignments, students have an opportunity to help in efforts to (Continued on page 90.)

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

O

ur program in social studies education prepares you for teaching secondary school social studies anywhere in the United States or overseas.To qualify for provisional or initial certification in New York and most other states, you take the National Teachers Examination after graduation. Our program also provides excellent preparation if you wish to work in other positions related to social studies education, such as textbook editor in publishing or a curriculum developer in an educational agency. Following is a small sampling of the positions obtained by recent graduates: • Secondary school teacher at, for example, Hunter College High School, Stuyvesant High School, Norman Thomas High School, and Brooklyn Technical High School • Educational filmmaker on an Australian aborigine project • Consultant on social studies curriculum materials • Congressional aide on education issues • Guidance counselor, Cleveland Board of Education

“Diversity is one of the things that made NYU so attractive to me. My classmates and professors are from all over the country and the world. Being deaf has never been a barrier for me. At NYU I found professors who are understanding and a University that is sensitive to my needs.” ROBERT CONNOR

90 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in social studies education, grades 7-12, includes courses in the liberal arts, the student’s major area of study, and the area of pedagogy. The program requires at least 60 points in liberal arts courses and a major area of study that permits students to explore the histories of Asia, Africa, or Latin America. Studies in U.S. history and the Western world, as well as a focus on social sciences and comparative politics, are also part of the curriculum. The pedagogical core provides students with a knowledge base in educational history and sociology. Emphasis is placed on the educational development of the adolescent and the role of the teacher within the school community. The course of study culminates in two semesters of student teaching in public or independent school settings.

TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES, GRADES 7-12 Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements) Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences (economics). V55.06••

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science I. V55.0201

4

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Natural Science II. V55.0202

4

Content Core†

44 Points

U.S. History to 1865. V57.0009

4

History of East Asia Since 1850. V57.0053 or History of East Asia to 1850. V57.0052 or History of African Civilization to the 19th Century. V57.0055 or History of African Civilization During the 19th and 20th Centuries. V57.0056 or History of Latin America. V57.0082

4

History of Modern Europe. V57.0012

4

Women in Europe Since 1750. V57.0196

4

Seminar: Fascism. V57.0290

4

4

Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001 or Foundations of Scientific Inquiry: Quantitative Reasoning. V55.0101

4

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay.V40.0110

4

Foreign Language I

4

Foreign Language II

4

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West.†‡ V55.04•• or Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Culture. †‡ V55.05•• or Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences (economics).†‡ V55.06••

Speech Communication.* E21.0033

4

Comparative Politics. V53.0500

4

Post-1865 U.S. History, Geography, and the Social Studies. E23.1073

4

Global History, Geography, and the Social Studies. E23.1800

4

* May be exempt by examination—substitute will be a liberal arts elective.

Robert Cohen Curriculum Coordinator (212) 998-5491 Department of Teaching and Learning The Steinhardt School of Education New York University East Building, Suite 635 239 Greene Street New York, NY 10003-6674

44 Points

† ‡

May include courses that also satisfy the liberal arts requirements. See general education requirements above.

• General education requirements, see the Morse Academic Plan, page 102.The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

(Continued from page 89.) reform social studies education in the real world of public school students and teachers.

Nationally Recognized Faculty Members of our faculty have participated in the key debates that have shaped the fields of social studies over the past decade, on issues such as multiculturalism, national history standards, and service learning. Faculty publish regularly in leading social studies journals, including Social Education, and have also published influential books on

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

education and community, school reform, and American history. They have spearheaded social studies curriculum reform projects in primary, middle, and secondary schools. Current faculty projects include a national study of service-learning, assessing school reform in New York City, and designing a curriculum for high school social studies classes on the political and historical implications of the World Trade Center disaster. Faculty in our program collaborate with colleagues in allied fields in our Department of Teaching and Learning, most notably English education, with whom we have developed a course that inte-

grates literature and history to prepare our graduates to take an interdisciplinary approach to social studies. Professor Robert Cohen is one of the social studies educators. His current work examines ways that bring social studies to life for both teachers and their students. Student teachers and the students they will themselves guide come face-to-face with the objects of history out in the field, actively developing their understandings through the development of on-line learning communities or community analysis. Professor Cohen is also an accomplished scholar of American political history and the history of social move-

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Social Studies Education • 91

Teacher Certification Requirements

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY New York Politics and Community Studies in the Social Studies. E23.1925 or Participatory Democracy, Service Learning, and the Social Studies. E23.1090

4

Integrating History and Literature with Adolescents. E27.1020

4

Common Pedagogical Core

Specialized Pedagogical Core

29 Points

New Student Seminar (taken with E27.0005). E03.0001

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

1

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Educating Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom. E75.1005

4

Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology. E27.1050

4

Human Development I: Early Adolescence. E63.0023

2

Human Development II: Adolescence. E63.0024

2

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. E27.1030

4

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

ments. He is the author of When the Old Left Was Young: Student Radicals and America’s Mass Student Movement 1929-1941. Professor Cohen blends his extensive scholarship with a feel for bringing history to life.

Fieldwork and Student Teaching In your junior year you begin your student teaching experience by observing middle or secondary school teachers and their students in their classrooms. Such observations in New York City’s public schools, along with methods of

16 Points

Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary School. E23.1039

2

Teaching Social Studies in the Middle School. E23.1037

2

Current Trends and Problems in Social Studies. E23.1135

4

Supervised Student Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School. E23.1046

4

Supervised Student Teaching of Social Studies in the Middle School. E23.1045

4

courses taught by veteran teachers, prepare you for your senior year of student teaching. In the fall semester of your senior year, under the guidance of your cooperating teacher (an NYU supervisor and methods teacher), you assume responsibility for teaching a daily middle school social studies class. This is followed in the spring with a semester of high school student teaching in social studies, which again will involve a collaborative effort among you, your cooperating school teacher, and your NYU faculty mentor.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses shown here reflect the changes approved by the New York State Education Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE: • Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education • Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education • Foreign Language Education

Helping You Start Your Career Many of our students receive their first job offer from the school where they do their teaching internship, and the New York City Board of Education recruits on campus at the end of each semester. There are also many opportunities in New York City to work for nonprofit international agencies that employ educators.

92 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Certification Program in Teaching Students with Speech and Language Disabilities A PROGRAM AND SKILLS IN GREAT DEMAND

Federal law mandates that children with speech, language, and hearing difficulties receive educational opportunities equal to children without such disabilities. The Bachelor of Science program prepares students to become certified as teachers of students with speech and language disorders. Through their academic preparation students learn about normal and disordered/delayed speech and language as well as hearing development and are trained to treat children who demonstrate disabilities in these areas. Graduates from this program will provide speech and language therapy to children in grades K-12 on an individual and small group basis, and they are in great demand both in the New York area and around the country as well.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology • 93

YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

A Rare Opportunity

Supervised Fieldwork

NYU is one of the few universities in the New York City metropolitan area that offers a Bachelor of Science degree leading to New York State certification for teaching students with speech and language disorders. This program prepares you to work as a teacher of speech improvement in all grades in any New York State school. It also prepares you to continue your specialized graduate education in the field of speech-language pathology or audiology, which is essential to becoming a licensed and certified professional.

As required fieldwork, you complete one semester of student teaching in a public or independent school in the New York City metropolitan area. Early on in the semester you observe an experienced teacher of the speech and hearing handicapped. Later you assume part of the teaching responsibilities under the teacher’s supervision. Members of our faculty visit the school and discuss your progress with you and the cooperating teacher. You also meet with department faculty and other student teachers in a class held on campus.

Liberal Arts Foundation Through course work in NYU’s College of Arts and Science, you develop a broad foundation in science, psychology, humanities, and other liberal arts that are essential to professional work as a speech teacher and a speech-language pathologist.

Thorough Grounding in the Field You receive a comprehensive education in the theoretical and practical aspects of speech-language pathology and audiology. In your freshman year you begin with courses that introduce you to the field of communication disorders.

Most teaching placements are in Manhattan public school districts located near NYU, where members of our faculty maintain special relationships with the supervisors of the speech and hearing rehabilitation programs.

Helping You Start Your Career Student teaching often leads to job opportunities as does networking with graduate students in the department. The demand for teachers in this field provides ample opportunities for you.

Student teaching and course work such as articulation disorders, language development, language disorders including mental retardation and autism, and aural rehabilitation develop your abilities to identify and treat communication disorders.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

U

pon graduating from our undergraduate program in teaching students with speech and language disorders, you are eligible to take the New York State Teacher Certification Examination (NYSTCE) series. If you pass the series of exams and file an application for teacher certification, the New York State Department of Education will grant you a teaching certificate.Your certification is readily transferable to most other states as well. Graduates with this certification are in great demand at public and private schools throughout the country. You will also be prepared to continue your specialized graduate study in speech-language pathology.This will qualify you for expanding job opportunities not only in schools but also in treatment and residential centers, hospitals, social service agencies, rehabilitation centers, and private practice. Recent graduates have found positions in public and private schools as teachers of speech improvement, working directly with children who have communication disabilities and speech and language problems. Others have gone on to study for the master’s degree to become professionally certified and licensed as speech-language pathologists.

94 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

THE PROGRAM The curriculum in teaching students with speech and language disabilities for all grades includes courses that satisfy requirements in liberal arts, the student’s major area of study, and the area of pedagogy. Students take at least 60 points in liberal arts courses. The major area of study provides students with specialized courses in speech pathology, the anatomy and physiology of the speech and hearing mechanisms, and language disorders in children. The pedagogical core prepares students to be educators in speech and hearing programs in schools. The curriculum includes a full range of field experiences and observations culminating in two semesters of student teaching in public and independent school settings.

TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DISABILITIES, ALL GRADES Liberal Arts (General Education Requirements)

60 Points

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Conversations of the West. V55.04•• Foundations of Contemporary Culture: World Cultures. V55.05••

4 4

Content Core

37 Points

Phonetics and Phonemics of American English. E21.0061

3

American Sign Language I. E28.1090

4

Speech Pathology I. E34.0017

2

Speech Pathology II. E34.0018

2

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Societies and the Social Sciences (economics). V55.06••

4

Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanism I. E34.0008

3

Foundations of Contemporary Culture: Expressive Culture. V55.07••

4

Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanism II. E34.0009

3

Human Reproduction and Development. V23.0003 4

Fundamentals of Hearing Science. E34.0229

2

Human Physiology. V23.0004

4

Introduction to Articulation Disorders. E34.1101

3

Fundamentals of Mathematics. E12.0001

4

Human Development I. E63.0020

4

Audiology: Intervention Strategies with Children. E34.1205

3

Introduction to Language Disorders in Children. E34.1207

3

Introduction to Audiology. E34.1230

3

Acoustic Phonetics. E34.0402

3

Language Development in Preschool Years. E34.1601

3

Writing the Essay. V40.0100

4

The Advanced College Essay. V40.0110

4

Foreign Language

4

Unrestricted Liberal Arts Electives Speech Communication.* E21.0033

12 4

For further information, call (212) 998-5230.

*May be exempt by examination—substitute will be a liberal arts elective.

Department of SpeechLanguage Pathology and Audiology The Steinhardt School of Education New York University 719 Broadway, Suite 200 New York, NY 100036860

• General education requirements, see the Morse Academic Plan, page 102.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology • 95

OTHER PROGRAMS TO SEE:

SAMPLE PROGRAM OF STUDY Common Pedagogical Core Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings. E27.0005

25 Points

Specialized Pedagogical Core

12 Points

1

Organization of Speech and Hearing Programs in the Schools. E34.1025

2

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. E27.1030

4

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II. E27.1002

4

Speech Pathology: An Introduction to Methods and Materials for Diagnosis and Therapy in the Schools. E34.1065

4

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015

3

Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology. E27.1050

Supervised Student Teaching of Speech in the Preschools, Elementary, Middle Schools, and High Schools. E34.1546

6

4

Human Development II: Early Childhood. E63.0021

2

Human Development II: Childhood. E63.0022

2

Educating Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom. E75.1005

4

New Student Seminar and site visits. E03.0001(taken with E27.0005)

School Violence Prevention Workshop (2 hours). E81.1990

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification (15 hours). E81.1999

1

The Steinhardt School of Education courses, page 111. Faculty, page 179. •

Teacher Certification Requirements In compliance with the New York State Board of Regents requirements for teacher certification, The Steinhardt School of Education has reregistered all teacher education undergraduate programs. Please note that the courses shown here reflect the changes approved by the New York State Educa-

tion Department. Students should consult departmental advisers for the most current information and certification requirements applicable to them. The Steinhardt School of Education will offer appropriate course work in order to accommodate all students. For further information, see your program adviser.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

• Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education • Communication Studies: Speech and Interpersonal Communication • Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education

96 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Dance Education

UNDERGRADUATE DANCE EDUCATION

We are no longer admitting new students into this undergraduate program. Currently enrolled students are advised to make their course selections after consulting with the Program in Dance Education faculty. Course listings may be found on pages 139-40.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Minors • 97

The Steinhardt School of Education Minors

MINORS AVAILABLE IN THE STEINHARDT SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Academic programs at The Steinhardt School of Education are designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the world at large while preparing them for a specific career. To help students increase their knowledge in a particular field other than their major, gain skills that suit both their needs and aspirations, and explore individual interests, the The Steinhardt School of Education offers a series of minors. These include studio art, communication studies (with concentrations in either graphics communications management and technology or speech and interpersonal communication, among others), educational theatre, music, nutrition and food studies, and teacher education (see pages 98-101).

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

98 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

AVAILABLE MINORS TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR (NONCERTIFICATION 18-POINT SEQUENCE)

Teacher Education Minor.................................................................................98 Studio Art Minor...................................................................................................98

Required Courses

18 Points

Communication Studies Minor.....................................................................99

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I. E27.0001

4

Human Development. E63.0020

4

Foundations of Special Education. E75.0083

3

Education as a Social Institution. E20.1015 or Critical History of Education. E55.1031

Communication Studies: Minor in Speech and Interpersonal Communication.....................................99

3

Educational Theatre Minor ...........................................................................100

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education. E27.1030 or Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology. E27.1050

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR The Steinhardt School of Education offers an official minor in education to students in the College of Arts and Science (CAS). Designed to give CAS students an opportunity to explore teaching, this minor will appear on the student’s transcript and consists of the 18-point sequence of courses listed above.

Music Minor ..........................................................................................................100 Nutrition Minor...................................................................................................101 4

The Steinhardt School of Education also has a teacher certification adviser who can assist CAS students with the minor in education. For more information, please contact Mark Perez, Office for Student Services and Public Affairs, The Steinhardt School of Education, 82 Washington Square East, Room 32, New York, NY 10003-6680; (212) 9985033.

Students—most of whom begin the sequence in the fall of their junior year—can start by taking just one or two courses. These courses are designed to provide students with an opportunity to look at contemporary education issues, to gain classroom experience, and to explore the merits of a career in teaching. In addition, completion of these courses can provide students with a head start in our master’s degree teacher certification programs.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Communication Studies: Minor in Graphic Communication Management and Technology ...................................99

Food Studies Minor ..........................................................................................101

Studio Art Minor (Please note: students must present a portfolio containing examples of art work as a prerequisite for acceptance into the program.) Points REQUIRED COURSES Introduction to Drawing. E90.1320 .....................................3 Introduction to Sculpture. E90.1340 .....................................3 Introduction to Painting. E90.1330 .....................................3 Introduction to Photography. E90.1360 .....................................3 ELECTIVES Select any total of 6 points from .0000 or .1000 level courses within the Department of Art and Art Professions. Students should consult the course listings for prerequisites. Studio courses may be repeated for credit. Recommended electives are as follows:

Points Introduction to Computer Art. E90.1354 .....................................3 Fundamentals of Printmaking. E90.0373 .....................................3 Sculpture: Anatomy for the Artist. E90.0346 ..........................3 Projects in Sculpture: Beginning Ceramics. E90.1640 .....................................3 Painting I. E90.1530......................3 Introduction to Video Art. E90.1352 .....................................3 Jewelry. E90.1390 ...........................3 TOTAL REQUIRED POINTS ............................18 For information on the minor in studio art, contact Linda Vega, Department of Art and Art Professions, (212) 998-5708.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Minors • 99

Communication Studies Minor Points REQUIRED COURSES Perspectives on Communications. E59.0001 .....................................4 History of Communication. E59.0003 .....................................4 ELECTIVES Select any total of 8 points from the following: Language, Thought, and Culture. E59.0010 .....................................4 Introduction to Media Criticism. E59.0014 .....................................4 Languages of Communication: Film, Television, and Radio. E59.1004 .....................................4 Mass Media and Society. E59.1016 .....................................4 Mass Media, Global Communication, and the Future. E59.1300 .....................................4 Introduction to Mass Persuasion and Propaganda. E59.1014 .......4 TOTAL REQUIRED POINTS ............................16 For information on the communication studies minor, please contact the Department of Culture and Communication, (212) 998-5191.

Communication Studies: Minor in Graphic Communication Management and Technology Points REQUIRED FOUNDATION COURSE Print and Human Experience. E24.1204 .....................................4 Remaining 12 points to be selected from the following two areas: MANAGEMENT COURSES Graphic Communications Management. E24.1101...........................3 Magazine Publishing Management. E24.1916 .....................................3 Buying of Printing and Graphic Communications Products. E24.1203 .....................................3 Selling of Printing and Graphic Communications Products. E24.1202 .....................................3 TECHNOLOGY COURSES Print Communications Technology I. E24.1501 ..............3 Print Communications Technology II. E24.1502 .............3 Desktop Publishing I. E24.1601 .....................................3 Desktop Publishing II. E24.1602 .....................................3 Publishing on the Internet. E24.1604 ...................................3 TOTAL REQUIRED POINTS ............................16 For information on the communication studies minor in graphic communication management and technology, contact Greg D’Amico, Department of Culture and Communication, (212) 9985128.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Communication Studies: Minor in Speech and Interpersonal Communication Points REQUIRED COURSES A minimum of 8 points to be chosen from the following: Speech Communication. E21.0033 .....................................4 Public Speaking. E21.1011............4 Group Discussion. E21.1015..........4 Argumentation and Debate. E21.1075 .....................................4 Persuasion. E21.1083 ..................4 Conflict Management Communication. E21.1081..................................3-4 Oral Interpretation I. E21.1033..................................3-4 or Oral Interpretation II. E21.1034..................................3-4 REQUIRED COURSES A minimum of 8 points to be chosen from the following: The Art of Narration. E21.1127 .....................................3 Voice and Diction. E21.0032 ...................................2 Gender Differences in Communications. E21.0001/1001 .......................1-2

Points Communication in Conflict Solving. E21.0002/1002 ....................1-2 Speech for International Students. E21.0005/1005 .......2-3 Listening. E21.0007/1007 .........1-2 Communication and Public Relations. E21.0003/1003 .......................1-2 Communication for Professionals. E21.0009/1009 .......................1-2 Interviewing Strategies. E21.0010/1010 .......................1-2 Nonverbal Communication. E21.0012/1012 .......................1-2 Cross-Cultural Communication. E21.0013/1013 .......................1-2 Communication in Organizational Settings. E21.0014/1014 ......................1-2 TOTAL REQUIRED POINTS ............................16 For information on the communication studies minor in speech and interpersonal communication, contact Deborah Borisoff, Department of Culture and Communication, (212) 998-5192.

100 • Degree Programs • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Educational Theatre Minor Points COURSES To be selected by advisement from the following: Stagecraft I, II. E17.0009,0010 ...................3 or 4 Acting I. E17.0027..................3 or 4 Masters of Modern Drama. E17.1057,1058 ...................3 or 6 Directing. E17.1081,1082 .....3 or 4 Physical Theatre Improvisation. E17.1113 ............3 Acting II. E17.0037.....................3-4 Introduction to Theatre for Young Audiences. E17.1005, 1006 ......................2-4 Design for the Stage. E17.1017..................................1-3 Theatre in Education: Learning Through Theatre. E17.1040 ......................3 Theory of Creative Drama. E17.1065 ....................................3 Methods of Conducting Creative Drama. E17.1067........................3 Masks and Puppetry. E17.1079 .....................................3

Points Styles of Acting and Directing I, II. E17.1099,1100 ..................3 or 4 Musical Theatre: Background and Analysis. E17.1101,1102 ...........................3 Beginning Playwriting. E17.1105 .....................................2 Stage Lighting. E17.1143...........3-4 Costume Design. E17.1175 ........3-4 Performing Arts in Western Civilization. E85.1505 .....................................4 TOTAL REQUIRED POINTS ............................24 For information on the educational theatre minor, contact Alistair Martin-Smith, Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions, (212) 998-5266.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Music Minor

Points Points (Total 12)

REQUIRED COURSES Music Theory I.* E85.0035 .....................................2 Music Theory II. E85.0036 .....................................2 Aural Comprehension I. E85.0006 .....................................1 Aural Comprehension II. E85.0007 .....................................1 Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation I. E85.0072 .....................................1 Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation II. E85.0073 ....................................1 and any two of the following: Music History I. E85.1067..............2 Music History II. E85.1068............2 Music History III. E85.1077...........2 Music History IV. E85.1078 ............2 Points (Total 4-12) Including private lessons ELECTIVE COURSES Aural Comprehension III. E85.0008 ..................................1 Aural Comprehension IV. E85.0009 ..............................1 Music Theory III. E85.0037...........2 Music Theory IV. E85.0038 ............2 Sight Reading for Singers. E85.0103 ...................................2 Business Structure/ Music Industry. E85.0221 .....................................2 MIDI Technology. E85.1007 ..........3 Audio for Video I. E85.1010...........3 Recording Technology for Nonmajors. E85.1022 ...........4 Electronic Music Synthesis. E85.1037 .....................................3 Jazz Theory. E85.1039....................3 (Prerequisites: E85.0035,0036,0037,0038) Jazz Improvisation. E85.1075 ....................................2 (Prerequisites: E85.0035,0036, 0037,0038)

Chamber Ensemble. E85.1080 .....................................1 NYU Band. E85.1083 ....................1 NYU Choral Arts Society. E85.1085 ...................................1 Jazz Ensemble. E85.1089...............1 Percussion Ensemble. E85.1090 .....................................1 Reference/Research in Jazz. E85.1121 .....................................3 Music for Children. E85.1201 .....................................2 Music Theatre History I. E85.1264 .....................................2 Music Theatre History II. E85.1265 .....................................2 Film Music: Historical Aesthetics and Perspectives. E85.1500..................................3-4 MIDI for Nonmajors. E85.1810 .....................................3 Private Lessons Wind/Percussion. E85.0034/1034 ...........2-8 (total) String Instrument. E85.0045/1045 ...........2-8 (total) Piano/Organ. E85.0056/1056 .........2-8 (total) Voice. E85.0063/1063 ...........2-8 (total) Composition. E85.1021......................2-8 (total) TOTAL REQUIRED POINTS ...........16 MINIMUM For information on the music curriculum minor, contact Paul Horan, Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions, (212) 998-5771.

*All music minor students must take the music theory placement examination administered by the music theory director. Students who need remedial theory/aural comprehension will be assigned to E85.0018, Basic Musicianship, 4 points, as a prerequisite for Music Theory I and Aural Comprehension I. Basic Musicianship, E85.0018, cannot be used toward the 16-24 points total for the music minor.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Minors • 101

Nutrition Minor Points REQUIRED COURSES Diet Assessment and Planning. E33.0060 .....................................3 Introduction to Foods and Food Science. E33.0085..............3 Food Management Theory. E33.0091 ....................................3 Nutrition and Health. E33.0119 .....................................3 Food Microbiology and Sanitation: Safety Certification. E33.1048.................................1 Human Anatomy and Physiology. E14.1035 .....................................3

Points

Additional related elective courses to supplement your nutrition studies:

Computers in Nutrition and Food I. E33.1017.........................1 Computers in Nutrition and Food II. E33.1018 .......................1 Computers in Nutrition and Food III. E33.1019......................1 Food Production and Management. E33.1052..............3 Communications Workshop in Foods and Nutrition. E33.1130 .....................................2 International Foods. E33.1183 .....................................1 International Nutrition. E33.1187..................................2-3 Advanced Foods. E33.1217.........1-3 Nutrition and Metabolism. E33.1269 .....................................3

Food and Society. E33.1051...........2 Food Issues of Contemporary Societies. E33.0071...................3

TOTAL REQUIRED POINTS ...........16 MINIMUM

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Food Studies Minor Points REQUIRED COURSES Introduction to Foods and Food Science. E33.0085..............3 Food Management Theory. E33.0091 .....................................3 Nutrition and Health. E33.0119 .....................................3 Food and Society. E33.1051...........2 Food Microbiology and Sanitation: Safety Certification. E33.1048 .....................................1 ELECTIVE COURSES Choose 4 points by advisement from: Computers in Nutrition and Food I. E33.1017.........................1 Computers in Nutrition and Food II. E33.1018 .......................1 Computers in Nutrition and Food III. E33.1019......................1

Points Food Issues of Contemporary Societies. E33.0071 .....................3 Food Production and Management. E33.1052..............3 Advanced Foods. E33.1217.........1-3 Additional related elective courses to supplement your food studies: Food Microbiology and Sanitation. E33.1023 ..................3 Communications Workshop in Foods and Nutrition. E33.1130 ....................................2 International Foods. E33.1183 .....................................1 International Nutrition. E33.1187..................................2-3 Food Management Essentials IV: Food Accounting. E33.1113........1 TOTAL REQUIRED POINTS ...........16 MINIMUM

102 • Liberal Arts Requirements • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Liberal Arts Requirements THE MORSE ACADEMIC PLAN (For students entering the school as freshmen in the fall 1997 semester and thereafter.)

Samuel F. B. Morse Daniel Huntington 1857, Oil on Canvas Grey Art Gallery and Study Center; NYU Art Collection; Gift of Medallion Alumni, 1938

The Morse Academic Plan (MAP) is an approach that immerses students in comparative, critical, exploratory, and interdisciplinary studies and seeks to build students knowledge base through sequentially designed courses in the liberal arts. Named for Samuel F. B. Morse, an early faculty member of the University who was an artist as well as a scientist and inventor, MAP exposes students to methods of analysis and forms of expression that are the bedrock of intellectual development in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Each major in The Steinhardt School of Education requires completion of some liberal arts courses through MAP. MAP requirements are tailored to complement course work in the major and vary slightly by fields and programs of study. MAP has four components: (1) expository writing; (2) foreign language; (3) the humanities/social science sequence called Foundations of Contemporary Culture (FCC); and (4) the mathematics/natural science sequence called Foundations of Scientific Inquiry (FSI).

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Liberal Arts Requirements • 103

Expository Writing It would be hard to exaggerate the value of the ability to communicate clearly and effectively in writing. The Expository Writing Program at NYU assumes that writing is not merely a useful skill but also a way of learning and knowing. Its courses focus on the examination of evidence, the

Foreign Language The study of foreign languages is an integral part of a liberal arts education. It nurtures an awareness of

Foundations of Contemporary Culture The Foundations of Contemporary Culture (FCC) sequence of the Morse Academic Plan is a series of four coordinated courses in the humanities and social sciences. Within each of the four offerings, students are free to pursue their particular interests through their choice of individual classes. Overall, the structure of the FCC ensures that every student gains a common core of skills and experiences in the liberal arts. In addition to the information on the Foundations of Contemporary Culture provided in this bulletin, detailed descriptions of each year’s course offerings may be found in the MAP brochure, published annually. CONVERSATIONS OF THE WEST Through exploration of contrasting and complementary works in the humanities from different periods, Conversations of the West provides a historical, literary, and philosophical context for education in the liberal arts. Students may choose from four tracks: Antiquity and the Middle Ages, Antiquity and the Renaissance, Antiquity and the Enlightenment, and Antiquity and the 19th Century. In each case, the classes begin with works from some of the ancient civilizations that have shaped the development of cultures in the West. Typically, the classes have the following readings in common: the books of Genesis and Exodus from the Hebrew Scriptures, the Gospel According to Luke and Acts of the Apostles from the

Foundations of Scientific Inquiry Science and technology play such a central role in the modern world that even individuals not directly engaged in scientific or technical pursuits need to have solid skills in quantitative and analytical reasoning and a clear understanding of scientific investigation. Even more than their forebears, citizens of the 21st century will need competence and confidence in dealing with the approaches and findings

development of ideas, and the clear expression of those ideas in a variety of different kinds of essays. During the first semester, students move from exploration to argument as they read and make use of various texts—written, visual, experiential—to create a spectrum of persuasive essays. In the second semester, the examined texts become

more complex, the writing tasks more difficult. The semester’s work moves students closer to the academic disciplines and requires them to grapple with intriguing questions that lead to richer ideas and more interesting forms of expression. The essays students write become more formal and argumentative, but no less compelling.

the diversity of human culture and serves the practical need for language skills in fields such as government, business, and research. New York University is a particularly exciting setting for language study

because of its location in a great cosmopolitan city, its international student body, its many renowned language programs and centers, and its rapidly expanding opportunities for study abroad.

Christian New Testament, a Platonic dialogue and a Sophoclean or Euripidean tragedy, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Augustine’s Confessions. In the second half of the course, the themes and ideas emerging from these texts are followed as they are maintained, reinterpreted, or disputed by later thinkers.

To understand the complexity of these phenomena, new methods have been developed to study societal structures and human behavior. Each of the courses under Societies and the Social Sciences begins from a particular disciplinary approach, social concern, or topic, in order to orient students to the characteristic methods of these social sciences. Students learn how issues are objectified for study, how data are collected and analyzed, and how new understanding is thereby achieved. Whether through an interdisciplinary approach, consideration of their historical development, or reflection on critical and positivistic debates, the courses help students both to appreciate the unique insights afforded by these methods and to recognize the limits of such inquiry. In this way, students move beyond the particular focus of the class to a broader understanding of methods and problems in the social sciences.

Conversations of the West is not a survey, but rather, an examination of how texts influence subsequent thinking, create traditions, and reflect societal ideals. Conversations of the West thus aims to provide a richer understanding of how cultures are constructed, modified, and represented. WORLD CULTURES The World Cultures courses introduce students to the ways in which cultural traditions are created and the ways in which cultures define themselves against internal and external alternatives. These courses introduce students to the methods and problems of cultural studies. Like Conversations of the West, World Cultures is not intended as a set of historical surveys. Each course is designed to examine the challenges of “translation”—of appreciating cultural traditions other than one’s own; to introduce students to the major texts, artifacts, and values of another cultural tradition; and to develop a sense of the diversity and similarities of the ways in which people in different cultural traditions understand, experience, and imagine their lives. SOCIETIES AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

EXPRESSIVE CULTURE In Expressive Culture students explore the complexities of artistic expression by focusing on one of five media: sounds, images, words, performance, or film. Each course introduces requisite historical, formal, and critical vocabularies; examines fundamental issues associated with interpretation of the arts making use of these media; and investigates the complex relations between artistic expression and other facets of social organization. The courses also make use, whenever possible, of the rich cultural resources of New York City.

Over the past several centuries, enormous social transformations have taken place around the world. of science if they are to make informed decisions on vital political, economic, and social issues. Rather than striving for encyclopedic coverage of facts, Foundations of Scientific Inquiry (FSI) courses stress the process of scientific reasoning and seek to illustrate the role of science and mathematics in our understanding of the natural world. The objectives of the FSI sequence are to give students who will not be science majors a positive experience in scientific inquiry and to encourage learning about

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how science is done. The quantitative component of these courses emphasizes the critical role of mathematics in the analysis of natural phenomena. The courses within the FSI are collected into three groups—Quantitative Reasoning, Natural Science I, and Natural Science II. All lectures are taught by regular faculty, including some of the University’s most distinguished professors, and each course includes workshops or related laboratory sections led by graduate student preceptors.

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QUANTITATIVE REASONING Students in Quantitative Reasoning engage mathematical concepts in a variety of contexts in the natural or social sciences. All courses include a substantial amount of problem solving that requires both conceptual and computational work. NATURAL SCIENCE I Scientific knowledge has its basis in our natural curiosity about the world around us and our place in it. These courses approach the physical sciences with the intent of asking and trying to answer interesting questions, dealing with topics ranging from the origin of our universe and planet to how human activity affects our environment. Students

Courses In addition to the information listed below, detailed descriptions of each year’s course offering may be found on the MAP Web site and in the MAP brochure, published annually. CONVERSATIONS OF THE WEST Note that the pre- or corequisite for all Conversations of the West courses is completion of, exemption from, or registration in V40.0100, V40.0110, or V40.0009. Conversations of the West sections all share a recommended reading list of works from Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern antiquity. Typically, the classes have the following readings in common: the books of Genesis and Exodus from the Hebrew Scriptures, the Gospel According to Luke and Acts of the Apostles from the Christian New Testament, a Platonic dialogue and a Sophoclean or Euripidean tragedy, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Augustine’s Confessions. Additional readings for each class are selected by the individual instructors, who take their guidance from the recommended reading lists for the several tracks. In addition to the traditional lecture/recitation format, selected sections of Conversations of the West are also offered in writing-intensive versions in conjunction with V40.0100, Writing the Essay. Please consult the Directory of Classes for each semester’s schedule.

Conversations of the West: Antiquity and the Middle Ages V55.0401 4 points. Continues with Dante’s Inferno and selections from Paradiso, with other readings from the Middle Ages.

consider the important roles played by laws of physics and chemistry in biology, earth and environmental sciences, astrophysics, and cosmology and develop an understanding of how the physical sciences inform the natural sciences generally. Mathematics is introduced in each course with frequent applications to the subject matter. Predictions that can be made only with the use of mathematics are clearly delineated, showing the powerful role it plays in our understanding of the universe. Wherever possible the courses relate science to societal problems and develop a historical perspective. NATURAL SCIENCE II The complexity of the biological realm continues to fascinate and challenge modern scientists, who are

Conversations of the West: Antiquity and the Renaissance V55.0402 4 points. Continues with Machiavelli’s Prince, a Shakespearean play, or Milton’s Samson Agonistes, and with other readings from the Renaissance.

Conversations of the West: Antiquity and the Enlightenment V55.0403 4 points. Continues with Pascal’s Pensées, Rousseau’s Confessions, and with other readings from the Enlightenment.

Conversations of the West: Antiquity and the 19th Century V55.0404 4 points. Continues with Marx’s Communist Manifesto, selections from Darwin, Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morality, or Freud’s Civilization and Its Discontents, and with other readings from the 19th and early 20th centuries.

WORLD CULTURES Note that the pre- or corequisite for all World Cultures courses is completion of, exemption from, or registration in V40.0100, V40.0110, or V40.0009.

World Cultures: The Ancient Near East and Egypt V55.0501 4 points. Egypt and Mesopotamia, the two great non-Western civilizations of the Ancient Near East, are examined through ancient texts illustrating their historical development and culture. These are the civilizations where writing began, and each had a significant impact on Israel, Greece, Rome, and, eventually, the West. Egypt and Mesopotamia are compared and contrasted for developments such as

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currently engaged in such diverse pursuits as exploring the organization and function of the brain, reconstructing the origin of the human species, linking the multiplicity of interactions in ecosystems, and deciphering the influence of heredity on complex traits. The courses in Natural Science II take a nontraditional approach to the life sciences, with an emphasis on approaching science as a dynamic process of investigation and discovery. Each course selects a broad theme that is at the forefront of contemporary research, then uses specific questions and examples to introduce students to the methodology of scientific inquiry, the critical evaluation of results, and the mathematical tools used to quantify scientific information.

urbanism and state formation, imperialism, religion, warfare, family life, trade and economy, kingship, the role of men and women, literature, cosmology, and art. We explore literature in the broadest sense, including documents that might otherwise be simply classed as historical.

World Cultures: Islamic Societies V55.0502 4 points. Examines the common base and regional variations of Islamic societies. An “Islamic society” is here understood as one that shares, either as operative present or as historical past, that common religious base called Islam. For Muslims, Islam is not simply a set of beliefs or observances but also includes a history; its study is thus by nature historical, topical, and regional. The emphasis in the premodern period is first on the Quran and then on law, political theory, theology, and mysticism. For the more recent period, the stress is on the search for religious identity. Throughout, students are exposed to Islamic societies in the words of their own writers.

World Cultures: Africa V55.0505 4 points. Key concepts related to understanding sub-Saharan African cultures and societies, concentrating in particular on teaching students how to think critically and consult sources sensibly when studying non-Western cultures. Topics include problems in the interpretation of African literature, African history, gender issues, the question of whether African thought and values constitute a unique system of thinking, the impact of the slave trade and colonialism on African societies and culture, and the difficulties of and means for translating and interpreting the system of thought and behavior in an African traditional society into terms meaningful to Westerners. Among the readings are novels, current philosophical theory, and feminist interpretations of black and white accounts of African societies and the place of women in them. Issues are approached with the use of analyses from history, anthropology, sociology, literary theory, and philosophy.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Liberal Arts Requirements • 105

World Cultures: The Chinese and Japanese Traditions V55.0506 4 points. Essential aspects of Asian culture—Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Shintoism—studied through careful reading of major works of philosophy and literature. A roughly equal division between Chinese and Japanese works is meant to give a basic understanding of the broad similarities and the less obvious, but allimportant, differences among the cultures of Confucian Asia. One reading is a Vietnamese adaptation of a Chinese legend. The last two readings, modern novellas from Japan and China, show the reaction of the traditional cultures to the Western invasions.

from history, anthropology, political economy, and the contemporary literature of the region.

World Cultures: China V55.0512 4 points. Fundamental concepts and practices of Chinese society and culture, examined using primary sources in translation whenever possible. By studying the social, political, religious, ideological, ritual, economic, and cultural life of the Chinese, students gain a sense of the core values and issues of Chinese civilization and how these have affected and continue to have an impact on the way people think and live.

World Cultures: Pre-Columbian America World Cultures: Japan—A Cultural History V55.0507 4 points. A consideration of the prehistory to Japan’s modernist transformation through an analysis of key literary, religious, and artistic texts. Concentrates on the historical experiences that produced elements of a national culture before there was a nation and on the consciousness of being Japanese before there was a “Japan.” Examines how key cultural elements were used to make a modern nation-state.

World Cultures: Russia Between East and West V55.0510 4 points. Distinctive historical and geographical dichotomies and issues in Russian culture. Emphasis is on primary documents, including literary works, travel notes, works of art, and political statements from all periods, chosen to establish the particular matrix of competing positions that make up the Russian national and cultural identity.

World Cultures: Middle Eastern Societies V55.0511 4 points. The popular American picture of the Middle East as a place of violence, veiled women, and oil wealth portrays none of the richness or complexity of most people’s lives in the region. This course examines how to make sense of societies that seem unfamiliar and how to think critically about Western images of the unfamiliar. Questions examined in depth include: What variety of sources do people in the Middle East draw on to define their sense of who they are—as members of particular households, regions, nations, or religious communities? How do women and men construct their gender identity? In what ways are village, town, and city lives being transformed? Do people of the Middle East experience their region’s politics the way it is portrayed in the West? What are some of the causes of political repression, armed struggle, or terror? How did European colonialism reshape the lives of people in the region, and how do they encounter today the cultural and economic power of the United States and Europe? Readings are drawn

V55.0513 4 points. The beliefs and practices of two major societies and cultures of pre-Hispanic Mexico: the Aztecs and the Mayas. We examine the nature of cultures based primarily on an oral tradition. Among the areas explored are how these cultures saw their origins and history; how they defined their relationship to community, to nature, to the gods, and to the state; their ways of seeing life and death; and their concept of time and reality. The course is organized around certain themes, among them, politics and governance, religion and ritual, history and myth, narrative and poetry, codices and stelae, urban centers and ceremonial spaces. It helps students understand non-Western ways of thought and practice and to see the continuity of these traditions into present-day indigenous culture. Also considered is the issue of the authenticity of sources translated from their original languages and transcribed in the postconquest period.

World Cultures: Ancient Israel V55.0514 4 points. The culture of the ancient Israelite societies of biblical times, covering the period from about 1200 B.C.E. to the conquests of Alexander the Great, in the fourth century B.C.E. Topics include the achievements of these societies in the areas of law and social organization, prophetic movements, Israelite religion, and ancient Hebrew literature. The Hebrew Bible preserves much of the creativity of the ancient Israelites, but archaeological excavations in Israel and neighboring lands, as well as the discovery of ancient writings in Hebrew and related languages, have added greatly to our knowledge of life as it was lived in biblical times. The civilizations of Egypt and Syria-Mesopotamia also shed light on Israelite culture. Of particular interest is the early development of Israelite monotheism, which, in time, emerged as ancient Judaism, the mother religion of Christianity and Islam.

World Cultures: Latin America V55.0515 4 points. Explores the cultural, social, and political organization of indigenous people before the period of European colonization. Studies the dynamics of the colonial encounter, focusing on such themes as indigenous

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

responses to European rule, the formation of “Indian” society, and the interaction of Europeans, Africans, and indigenous people. Considers postcolonial Latin America, focusing on themes such as political culture, competing ideologies of economics and social development, and the construction of collective identities based on region, race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Readings for the course consist mostly of primary sources and allow us to hear diverse voices within Latin American society. Works by European conquerors, Inca and Aztec descendants in the colonial period, and African and creole slaves. Course materials also include novels, short stories, films, photographs, and music.

World Cultures: India V55.0516 4 points. Considers the paradoxes of modern India: ancient religious ideas coexisting with material progress, hierarchical caste society with parliamentary democracy, and urban shantytowns with palatial high-rises. The course integrates research on India’s cultural values with social- scientific perspectives on their contemporary relevance. By examining problems such as protective discrimination for lower castes and cultural nationalism, it shows how democracy involves difficult choices among competing, often opposed, ancient and modern cultural values.

World Cultures: Native Peoples of North America V55.0519 4 points. Since well before contact with Europeans, native peoples living in the United States and Canada have spoken many different languages, practiced many varied lifeways, and organized their societies distinctively. To convey a sense of the range and diversity of contemporary Native American life, and to understand the impact of colonial and postcolonial histories on current affairs, this course draws on anthropological, linguistic, sociological, historical, and literary works. Concepts and images developed in a variety of academic disciplines as well as in popular culture are discussed and examined critically. Studies of societies in three geographic areas (the Northwest, the Southwest, and the Northeast) are used to explore particular problems confronting analysts and native peoples alike. Some of these problems are how we understand social and cultural diversity and complexity, differing systems of value and social inequality, language use, uses of documentary and oral histories, the impact of urban and rural lifeways, museums, federal acknowledgment or recognition of tribal status, and repatriation (the return of bones and objects of cultural importance to native people).

World Cultures: Muslim Europe V55.0520 4 points. From the early eighth century C.E. onward, Islamic civilization, which embraced both sides of the Mediterranean, made far-reaching and critical contributions to the course of Western development. This

106 • Liberal Arts Requirements • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

course explores the past and present of Muslims within the boundaries of present-day Europe. It begins by examining the foundation of the oldest Islamic societies of the West, with particular emphasis on the art and science of Al-Andalus (medieval Spain) and on the early modern government and social structure of the Ottoman Balkans. Through history, literature, and the visual arts, the second half of the course focuses on the diversity of the modern Muslim experience in Europe, from Russia to England. It also addresses the dilemmas of self-definition and survival that confront citizen and immigrant alike as minorities within predominantly Christian nation-states.

World Cultures: Islam in Asia V55.0523 4 points. Two-thirds of the world’s Muslims today live in Central, South, and Southeast Asia. The course examines the ways in which Islamic traditions spread from the Middle East, the nature of the ensuing dialogue between Muslims and adherents of existing traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, shamanism), and the politics of Islam today, from Afghanistan eastward to the Philippines. The object of the course is to highlight the nature of dialogue and conflict between the adherents of Islam and those of other religious traditions, to clarify the economic and social issues behind conflicts waged in the name of religion, and to depict the different and constantly evolving “Islams” that thrive in Asia.

World Cultures: New Guinea V55.0524 4 points. How has the outside world imagined, toured, colonized, and portrayed the island of New Guinea? Conversely, how have New Guineans responded to these events and interactions, both by internalizing and contesting external depictions and domination? We study the contrastive ways outsiders and New Guineans have narrated these overlapping experiences and histories. We approach the topic through specific dramas, events, and processes, for example, first contact and colonialism, missionization, the Second World War, and independence. Course materials include different media and modes of representation. We view historical and contemporary films by and about New Guineans, listen to recordings and radio programs, and read writings by indigenous and non-New Guinean authors.

World Cultures: Muslim Spain V55.0527 4 points. Considers one example of the long-term establishment of a Muslim polity in Europe. Traces the political flow of events from the Arab-Berber conquest of the peninsula and their experiments in state-formation to the emergence of Christian rivals in the northern kingdoms and the reversal of the tide until the final submission of the surviving Muslim enclave of Granada in 1492. Of chief concern is the construction of a remarkable social and intellectual culture out of the various indigenous and

imported elements; how the three indigestible ingredients called Islam, Christianity, and Judaism fared in that melting pot the Spaniards called convivencia, particularly when one of the others was stirring; and the problems posed by the notion of “Muslim Spain” for Spanish historians and for Westerners generally.

World Cultures: Russia Since 1917 V55.0528 4 points. Major periods, developments, and interpretative issues in Russian politics, history, and society, from the 1917 revolution to the present. The emphasis is on the Soviet experience, though the Tsarist past and post-Soviet developments are also considered. Special attention is given to the role of historical traditions, leadership, ideology, ramifying events, and socioeconomic factors.

World Cultures: Contemporary Latino Cultures V55.0529 4 points. Examines the growth and development of Latino as a distinct category of identity out of the highly diverse populations of Latin American background in the U.S., paying particular attention to the social processes shaping its emergence. Provides a detailed examination of the processes of cultural creation behind the rising growth of transnational cultures and identities worldwide, and of the forces that are fueling their development. We start by exploring the immigration of Latin American peoples to U.S. cities, turn to three case studies of emerging Latino communities, and end by examining contemporary issues involving Latinos in urban centers, such as New York.

SOCIETIES AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES Note that the prerequisite for all Societies and the Social Sciences courses is completion of or exemption from V40.0100 or V40.0009.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Topics in Interdisciplinary Perspective V55.0600 4 points. An examination of social phenomena that cross the boundaries among the various social-scientific disciplines. Topics vary each term and may include, for example, human migration, religion, fascism, or colonialism. By considering the methodologies appropriate to the study of these topics, students learn to appreciate the characteristic approaches of the social sciences, their power to help us understand such phenomena, and their limitations.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Gender and Power V55.0607 4 points. How does gender structure our social worlds? How do gender systems, as systems of power, shape the lives of

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women and men cross-culturally? How do different social theories and analytical frameworks allow us to think more clearly about these questions? We analyze gender systems in diverse societies (Africa; South, East, and Southeast Asia; Eastern and Western Europe; and the Middle East) and consider the effects that historical and contemporary interconnections among societies have had on gender systems and women’s lives. Topics include theories of women’s status; forms of analysis; comparative revolution (China, France, Iran); rights, needs, and citizenship; the politics of reproduction; women’s work in the global economy.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Capitalism V55.0615 4 points. What is capitalism? By the end of the 20th century it seemed to have conquered the world. Countries everywhere are turning to the idea of the free market and are being pulled or pushed in the global economy of capitalism. Despite capitalism’s success, social scientists have never agreed about what it is or how it works. We examine some of the different ways in which social scientists over the last 200 years have tried to tell the story of how capitalism works and also explore some of the different kinds of capitalism that exist today and the different ways in which social scientists understand them.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Language of America’s Ethnic Minorities V55.0616 4 points. Examines the role of language in communities in the United States, specifically within African American, Asian American, Latino, and Native American populations. Explores the relationship of language to culture, race, and ethnicity. In particular, looks for similarities and differences across these communities, and considers the role that language experiences play in current models of race and ethnicity.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Metropolitan Studies V55.0631 4 points. Considers the major approaches that have been deployed to investigate the urban experience in the modern world and explores the historical geography of capitalist urbanization with particular attention to North American and Western European cities, to colonial and postcolonial cities, and to the global contexts of urban development. Major topics include urban and regional planning, urban politics and governance, suburbanization and regional development, gentrification and urban social movements, the gendering and radicalization of urban space, racial segregation, and urban design and architecture.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Liberal Arts Requirements • 107

Society and the Social Sciences: Anthropological Perspectives V55.0640 4 points. Anthropology concerns the ways in which people live in society, especially as mediated through cultural processes. Deeply concerned with non-Western as well as Western ways of life and the relations between them, anthropology addresses the problem of differences and similarities within and between human populations, including the use of differences to establish or resist power within social formations. Anthropology views such differences not simply as situations of the past but as constantly being produced in new global formations of power and commerce. Students explore how anthropologists use data to develop basic premises about the nature of human societies and the foundations of distinctive regimes of sociality, and they examine theories of social life in the terms of a commitment to grasping the perspectives, knowledge, and lived experience of social actors through the methodology of ethnographic fieldwork.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Economic Perspectives V55.0650 4 points. Economics explores the ways that individuals in society assign value, act to optimize the gain of what they consider valuable, and seek to limit the risk of losing those valuables. To understand how people make these decisions, economists model the ways that individuals take account of uncertain circumstances, the limits of their own knowledge, and the inefficiency of social institutions in which they participate. Topics may include decision theory, markets, and the historical development of economic analysis. With this perspective, students go on to consider social issues such as voting behavior or fiscal and trade policy. Consideration is also given to critiques of economics’ methods and to discussion of other social-scientific approaches.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Linguistic Perspectives V55.0660 4 points. Examines language from a dual perspective: as part of humankind’s biological endowment and as a social phenomenon. Considers the structure, universality, and diversity of human language. Introduces the core areas of grammar: its sound system, the structures of words and sentences, and meanings. Examines the representation of language in the brain, first-language acquisition, and processing. Introduces linguistic universals, dialect, sociolects, and the mechanism of linguistic change.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Political Perspectives V55.0670 4 points. The study of politics uses social science methods to understand the institutions that societies construct to address their problems and needs. Topics may include

interstate war, ethnic conflict, environmental degradation, democratic transition, poverty, globalization, or government gridlock. Students analyze the institutional strategies that have been devised to deal with these issues and examine related theoretical concerns with concrete implications for reform. For instance: What is the best way to foster international cooperation in an area where little or none exists? How can formerly nondemocratic states successfully make a transition to democracy? How important is an independent judiciary, and how can it be established? What, if anything, can be done to ensure genuine competition between political parties, and on what does it depend? Important questions of social science method are also considered, such as the role of theoretical models in explanation, the status of inferences made from small samples, and the widespread problem of selection bias in nonexperimental data.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Psychological Perspectives V55.0680 4 points. Why do people do what they do, think what they think, feel what they feel? Psychology is the scientific study of the mind and individuals’ behavior. It assumes that mental and behavioral events—normal and abnormal—have biological, psychological, and social or cultural causes. Studying these causes, how they operate, and what their consequences are yields greater understanding of oneself, other people, and our society; it may also have implications for social policy and for how we lead our lives. Analyzing data from observations, surveys, and experiments, students consider the current state of psychological knowledge, how it is obtained, and its limitations.

Societies and the Social Sciences: Sociological Perspectives V55.0690 4 points. How can we understand the uniquely social or collective aspects of human lives? Sociology begins with the recognition that the lives of individuals are profoundly shaped by social groups and institutions. It maintains that these groups and institutions have a reality of their own, which cannot be understood simply as the product of individual actions, beliefs, and desires; and that they shape individuals as much as, or even more than, individuals shape society. Students consider the relationship between individuals, groups, and institutions in particular contexts, examining topics such as social protest, law and criminality, social policy, the economic organization of society, the arts, and contemporary conflicts over religion, race, class, and gender. They explore how various social-scientific theories and methods illuminate such issues and how these insights may help us to address important social problems.

EXPRESSIVE CULTURE Note that the prerequisite for all Expressive Culture courses is completion of or exemption from V40.0100 or V40.0009.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Expressive Culture: Words V55.0710 4 points. What is literature or the literary? Is there a literary language that works differently from ordinary language? What is literary style and form? What is the position of the writer or artist in relation to society, and what is the function of the reader? Is literature a mirror of the world that it describes, an attempt to influence a reader’s ideas or opinions, an expression of the identity of the writer, or none of these? This course attempts to answer some of these questions.

Expressive Culture: Images V55.0720 4 points. What is the place of art in an image-saturated world? The course begins with a consideration of the power and taboo of images and the ways in which individuals and institutions that constitute “the art world” classify some of these images as works of art. The bulk of the course is an exploration of the visual and conceptual challenges presented by major works of sculpture, architecture, and painting. It concludes with a selection of problems raised by art today. The course is designed to equip students with the vocabulary to both appreciate and question the artistic “gestures” of society in various places and times.

Expressive Culture: Images—Painting and Sculpture in New York Field Study V55.0721 4 points. New York’s public art collections contain important examples of painting and sculpture from almost every phase of the past, as well as some of the world’s foremost works of contemporary art. Meeting once a week for an extended period, the course combines on-campus lectures with group excursions to the museums or other locations where these works are exhibited.

Expressive Culture: Images— Architecture in New York Field Study V55.0722 4 points. New York’s rich architectural heritage offers a unique opportunity for firsthand consideration of the concepts and styles of modern urban architecture, as well as its social, financial, and cultural contexts. Meeting once a week for an extended period, the course combines on-campus lectures with group excursions to prominent buildings. Consideration is given both to individual buildings as examples of 19th- and 20th-century architecture, as well as to phenomena such as the development of the skyscraper and the adaptation of older buildings to new uses.

Expressive Culture: Sounds V55.0730 4 points. Our lives pulsate with patterns of sounds that we call music. We encounter these sounds in our homes, cars, stores, and exercise salons. They accompany us to the

108 • Liberal Arts Requirements • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

grocery store, the dentist’s office, and the movies, yet we rarely think consciously about what they mean. This course investigates the function and significance of music and the musician in human life. A series of specific case studies raises basic questions about how music has been created, produced, perceived, and evaluated at diverse historical moments, in a variety of geographical locations, and among different cultural groups. Through aural explorations and discussion of how these vivid worlds “sound” in time and space, students and faculty together reassess the value of music in human experience.

sciences and economics. Topics include the scale of things in the natural world; the art of making estimates; cross-cultural views of knowledge about the natural world; growth laws, including the growth of money and the concept of “constant dollars”; radioactivity and its role in unraveling the history of the earth and solar system; the notion of randomness and basic ideas from statistics; scaling laws—why are things the size they are?; the cosmic distance ladder; the meaning of “infinity.” This calculator-based course is designed to help you use mathematics with some confidence in applications.

Expressive Culture: Performance

Quantitative Reasoning: Mathematics and the Computer

V55.0740 4 points.

V55.0102 4 points.

This course examines “performance” both as a practice and as a theoretical tool with which to understand today’s world. The broad spectrum of live performance is explored by means of lectures, discussions, and field trips. Students look at theatre and dance, performance in everyday life, rituals, popular entertainments, and intercultural performance. On the theoretical level, students are introduced to “speech acts,” “restored behavior,” “ritual process,” and “play.” Students see a broad variety of performances, such as Native American powwow, Indian Hindu ritual drama, off-Broadway theatre and dance, African American gospel, street performers, and courtroom trials.

The mathematics and physics that make the digital world a reality are the subject of this class. Students investigate the mathematical ideas behind how computers operate and construct decision-making machines that obey the principles of mathematical logic. The course includes a basic introduction to electricity and circuits, allowing students to make physical realizations of abstract mathematical ideas, such as number bases, in order to see their importance to the design of computational machines. The transistor, the basic element of the central processing unit of the computer, is considered in theory and is the subject of a laboratory exploration. Students design and construct circuits that perform arithmetical operations, such as addition, as well as more complex circuits, such as the encoder, decoder, multiplexer, and arithmetic logic unit, that are critical to the functioning of the computer.

Expressive Culture: Film V55.0750 4 points. Film is a medium that combines a number of arts. It lies at the intersection of art and technology and of art and mass culture and at the boundaries of the national and the global. Film is also a medium that coincides with and contributes to the invention of modern life. This course explores the expressive and representational achievements of cinema in the context of modernity and mass culture, providing students with the concepts to grasp the different ways in which films create meaning, achieve their emotional impact, and respond in complex ways to the historical contexts in which they are made.

QUANTITATIVE REASONING Note that the prerequisite for all Quantitative Reasoning courses is completion of or exemption from V63.0005. In addition to the traditional lecture/workshop format, selected sections of Quantitative Reasoning are also offered in small-group formats. Please consult the Directory of Classes for each semester’s schedule.

Quantitative Reasoning: Mathematical Patterns in Nature V55.0101 4 points. Examines the role of mathematics as the language of science through case studies selected from the natural

Quantitative Reasoning: Mathematical Patterns in Society V55.0103 4 points. Examines the role of mathematics in a variety of contexts in the natural and social sciences, but with special emphasis on problems in economics. The course develops tools that span both the natural and the social sciences, including sampling, growth and decay, present value, and probability and statistics. These topics are used as a foundation to explore the application of mathematical approaches to economics, especially the use of game theory and its related techniques.

NATURAL SCIENCE I Note that the prerequisite for all Natural Science I courses is completion of or exemption from V55.01XX.

Natural Science I: The Cosmos and the Earth V55.0202 4 points. Focuses on the modern scientific findings relating to major questions about the universe and our place in it. What is the origin of the universe? How did the elements form? Where do stars and planets come from? How did life on Earth originate? How did intelligence develop and

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human beings come to exist? And are we alone in the cosmos? Evidence for the big bang theory of the creation of the universe and the formation of elements during stellar evolution is presented, along with how that evidence is extracted from the analysis of light coming from the stars. The constituents of the universe, from the large-scale realm of the galaxies to exotic objects such as neutron stars and black holes, are discussed. The course then focuses on the earth and other earthlike planets, outlines the evolution of life and intelligence in the context of the sometimes catastrophic geologic history of our planet, and ends with a discussion of the possibilities for intelligent life in the cosmos. Laboratory projects include studies of the nature of light and the observed spectra of starlight, the evidence for an expanding universe, experimental studies of impact cratering on planetary surfaces and the current impact hazard, the geologic evidence for continental drift, and the catastrophic causes of mass extinctions of life.

Natural Science I: Energy and the Environment V55.0203 4 points. Uses the principles of chemistry to analyze the environmental implications of energy usage and policy decisions concerning energy and the environment. Topics include the atmosphere, ozone and its depletion, greenhouse gases, and acid rain. Case studies from the New York City environment, such as the Hudson River, are used to focus discussions. Finally, the basis of our need for energy, fossil fuels and their supplies, and the available alternatives are discussed.

Natural Science I: Einstein’s Universe V55.0204 4 points. Addresses the science and life of Einstein in the context of 20th-century physics, beginning with 19th-century ideas about light, space, and time in order to understand why Einstein’s work was so innovative. Einstein’s most influential ideas are contained in his theories of special relativity, which reformulated conceptions of space and time, and general relativity, which extended these ideas to gravitation. Both these theories are quantitatively explored, together with wide-ranging applications of these ideas, from the nuclear energy that powers the sun to black holes and the big bang theory of the birth of the universe.

Natural Science I: Exploration of Light and Color V55.0205 4 points. Color science is an interdisciplinary endeavor that incorporates both the physics and perception of light and color. This course is an introduction to color and the related topics of light and optics, including their applications to photography, art, natural phenomena, and technology. Science has provided a rich understanding of visual effects that has dramatically enriched our appreciation of what we see. Topics include how color is described and measured (colorimetry), how light is pro-

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Liberal Arts Requirements • 109

duced, how atoms and molecules affect light, how the human retina detects light, and how lenses are used in cameras, telescopes, and microscopes. Our investigation necessarily touches on aspects such as the anatomy of the eye and aspects of human vision that influence how we see color. Laboratory projects include additive and subtractive color mixing, pinhole photography, cow eye dissection, colorimetric measurements, and color classification schemes.

Natural Science I: From Plato to Pluto— Scientists View the Solar System V55.0206 4 points. The first half deals with the basic phenomena of astronomy: the earth and sky, the motions of stars, sun, moon, and planets. It then considers the historical development of astronomy from antiquity to the 17th century. The last quarter is devoted to the space-age exploration of the solar system. Laboratory exercises help familiarize students with basic astronomical concepts.

Natural Science I: Systems of the Human Body V55.0207 4 points. Aims to develop the sciences necessary to understanding the various interrelated systems operating within the human body. The skeletal-muscle system converts muscle contraction into human motion (the science of biomechanics is relevant here). The cardiovascular system transports blood throughout the body, carrying oxygen to the site of muscle contractions and removing carbon dioxide and heat (fluid dynamics). The consumed oxygen is converted into work and heat, and the rate of consumption varies with speed in walking, running, etc. (thermodynamics). The nervous system transports electrical signals from the sensory perceptors to the brain and from there to the muscles; these signals determine human reaction time, coordination, and optimal strategies for human performance (electrodynamics and optimal control theory). All of these systems, working together, make possible human motion and thought.

NATURAL SCIENCE II Note that the prerequisite for all Natural Science II courses is completion of or exemption from V55.01XX and V55.02XX.

Natural Science II: Human Genetics V55.0302 4 points. We are currently witnessing a revolution in human genetics, where the ability to scrutinize and manipulate DNA has allowed scientists to gain unprecedented insights into the role of heredity. This course explores the foundations and frontiers of modern human genetics, with an emphasis on understanding and critically evaluating new discoveries in this rapidly evolving field of research. The syllabus begins with an overview of the principles of inheritance, where simple Mendelian genetics is contrast-

ed with the interactions of genes and environment that influence complex physical or behavioral traits. In this context, we develop the statistical techniques used to quantify genetic inheritance or establish a linkage between genes and characteristics. Descending to the molecular level, the course investigates how genetic information is encoded in DNA and examines the science and social impact of genetic technology, including topics such as cloning, genetic testing, and the human genome project. The course concludes by studying how genes vary in populations and how geneticists are contributing to our understanding of human evolution and diversity. The laboratory projects throughout the semester introduce students to the methodology of genetic research, ranging from diagnosing inherited traits in families to hands-on explorations of the techniques of genetic engineering.

Natural Science II: Human Origins V55.0305 4 points. The study of “human origins” is an interdisciplinary endeavor that involves a synthesis of research from a number of different areas of science. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the various approaches and methods used by scientists to investigate the origins and evolutionary history of our own species. Topics include reconstructing evolutionary relationships using molecular and morphological data, the mitochondrial Eve hypothesis, ancient DNA, human variation and natural selection, the use of stable isotopes to reconstruct dietary behavior in prehistoric humans, solving a 2,000year-old murder mystery, the importance of studies of chimpanzees for understanding human behavior, and the four-million-year-old fossil evidence for human evolution.

Natural Science II: Brain and Behavior V55.0306 4 points. This course covers current and important topics in neuroscience. Why do so many people drink alcohol and take drugs? What does Prozac do to the brain? Is the brain closer to a computer or a plant? Students gain an understanding of the role of the brain and the nervous system in such areas as learning, perception, drug addiction, depression, stress, and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Laboratory topics explore brain anatomy, basic neural processes, sensory systems, receptor function, and behavior through hands-on experiments and computer demonstrations. Handling of animals and animal brain tissue is required in some labs.

Natural Science II: The Molecules of Life V55.0310 4 points. Our lives are increasingly influenced by the availability of new pharmaceuticals, ranging from drugs that lower cholesterol to those that influence behavior. This course examines the chemistry and biology of biomolecules that make us the molecular machinery of the cell. Critical to the function of such biomolecules is their three-dimensional structure that endows them with a specific function. This information provides the scientific basis for understanding drug action and how new drugs are

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designed. The course begins with the principles of chemical binding, molecular structure, and acid-base properties that govern the structure and function of biomolecules. It then applies these principles to study the varieties of protein architecture and how enzymes facilitate biochemical reactions. It concludes with an overview of molecular genetics and how recent information from the Human Genome Project is stimulating new approaches in diagnosing disease and designing drug treatments.

Natural Science II: Lessons from the Biosphere V55.0311 4 points. Provides a foundation of knowledge about how Earth’s biosphere works. This includes the biggest ideas and findings about biology on the global scale—the scale in which we live. Such knowledge is especially crucial today because we humans are perturbing so many systems within the biosphere. The course has four main sections: (1) Evolution of Life: How did life come to be what it is today? (2) Life’s Diversity: What is life like today on the global scale? (3) Cycles of Matter: How do life and the nonliving environment interact? (4) The Human Guild: How are humans changing the biosphere and how might we consider our future within the biosphere? The course includes laboratory experiments and an exploration at the American Museum of Natural History.

Natural Science II: Earth, Life, and Time V55.0312 4 points. Over the last four billion years, life on Earth has evolved in response to changes in the environment. At the same time, major innovations in the history of life have led to transformations of the earth’s physical environment. “Earth, Life, and Time” examines the history of the intimate relationship between the earth’s changing environment and the evolution of life on the planet. This longterm historical perspective provides a context for understanding current environmental issues such as global warming, tropical deforestation, and loss of biodiversity.

THE STEINHARDT SCHOOL OF EDUCATION: INTEGRATED LIBERAL ARTS COURSES

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II E27.1002 For students in teacher certification programs. Focuses on the themes of knowledge and knowing and schools and schooling. Builds on students’ extensive and continuing field experiences as the basis for a critical examination of how the academic disciplines, the school organization, and the curriculum contribute to teaching and learning. Through individual and interdisciplinary group projects, students explore how knowledge is constructed, how literacy skills are developed and contribute to what pupils come to know, and how the individuals within a school interact and affect the school’s mission.

110 • Liberal Arts Requirements • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Food and Nutrition in a Global Society E33.1180 This course, which fulfills the Integrated Liberal Arts requirement, unites the liberal arts experience with a specialization in food and nutrition. It contains three areas of focus: food and nutrition history; ethical issues in food and nutrition; and emerging technologies as they related to food and nutrition.

Ethical Issues in Professional Life E50.1050 Ethical issues in the human service professions. Historical perspective on the evolution of the professional idea. Ethical issues inherent to the idea of being a professional; examples drawn from education, nursing, health, art, and business.

Integrated Liberal Arts: Communication E59.1200 Open only to seniors in the Department of Culture and Communication. All others by permission of instructor. A culminating course integrating models of interpretation derived from the liberal arts with the analytical

tools developed in communication studies. The course reflects current research interests within the department and encourages students to explore emerging issues in the field of communication studies, including media and globalization, professional ethics and the interaction between audiences and texts.

Diversity and Professional Life E66.1011 An interdisciplinary approach to diversity issues including gender, race, class, and sexual orientation, as they impact on the intersection of personal, professional, and political lives. Includes analyses drawn from psychology, economics, anthropology, and other fields as they bear on professional values, patterns of discrimination, work-family conflicts, and related areas.

The Performing Arts in Western Civilization E85.1505 Seminal events and personalities in Western civilization are explored chronologically through the use of films, readings, listening assignments, and lectures. In

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addition to the historical emphasis, a secondary stress is placed on the role of the performer (instrumentalist, singer, conductor, actor, and dancer) in arts in Western society.

Art, Culture, and Society E90.1995 The visual arts are explored in the full context of the socioeconomic, political, and ethical forces that have shaped them with particular attention to recurring patterns and themes. Questions of context, accessibility, and the role of the creative artist in social change are explored from Periclean Athens to contemporary society, focusing on definitions of the individual and ideas of social order. The course includes field trips and guest lectures to supplement the instructors’ lectures and class discussion.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Courses • 111

Courses

CLASSIFICATION OF COURSES

The following pages contain descriptions of the courses offered at The Steinhardt School of Education. Courses are listed in numerical order, assigned the letter E as a prefix, and a number.

E 11 . 1 601

For example:

E indicates the course is given at The Steinhardt School of Education.

These two digits indicate the department, program, or unit offering the course (e.g., E11=English Education).

The first digit after the decimal indicates eligibility to take the course: 0=undergraduate students 1=junior, senior, and graduate students

The last three digits constitute the course number within the given department, program, or unit.

indicates a course in English education for juniors, seniors, and graduate students only • A hyphen between numbers indicates that neither term of the course may be taken for credit without the other term. • A comma between numbers indicates that either term of the course may be taken without the other term. • A full course is the work prescribed for a class that meets at least two hours each week for a period of 30 weeks or the equivalent. • A half course is the work prescribed for a class that meets at least two hours a week for a period of 15 weeks or the equivalent. Unless otherwise stated, two half courses will be accepted as equivalent to one full course. • Courses given on the first (1) level and the second (2) level are differentiated, in part, by the amount of work required in each, as follows: first (1) level courses require, for 2 points of credit a term, a minimum of four hours of outside study for each recitation period plus a term paper or equivalent project involving research. A second (2) level course requires, for 3 points of credit a term, seven hours of outside study for each recitation period and a term paper or equivalent project involving more elaborate and intensive research.

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112 • E11 to E12 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Department/Program..........................Number Applied Psychology .............................................E63 Art.........................................................................E90 Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education ............................E75 Childhood Education and Childhood Special Education: Dual Certificate Program Courses.................................E12/E25/E75 Communication Studies ...................................E59 Dance Education ................................................E89 Deafness Rehabilitation .................................... E28 Early Childhood Elementary Education ...........E25 Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education: Dual Certificate Program Courses...............E12/E25/E75 Educational Communication and Technology..........................................................E19 Educational Theatre...........................................E17 English Education ..............................................E11 Foreign Language Education ............................E29 Graphic Communications Management and Technology...................................................E24 Health Education................................................E81 History of Education...........................................E55 International and Social Studies Education ............................................................E23 Mathematics Education .....................................E12 Media Ecology.....................................................E38 Music ...................................................................E85 Nursing................................................................E41 Nutrition and Food Studies................................E33 Philosophy of Education....................................E50 Quantitative Studies............................................E16 Science and Mathematics Education ................E36 Science Education ..............................................E14 Social Studies Education....................................E23 Sociology of Education.......................................E20 Special Education...............................................E75 Speech and Interpersonal Communication..................................................E21 Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.............................................................E34 Teaching and Learning......................................E27 Women’s Studies Commission Series ...............E66

E11: ENGLISH EDUCATION

Reading and Literature with Adolescents

Literature as Exploration

E11.1600 60 hours: 4 points. Fall.

E11.0071 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. Designed to develop an understanding of the literary experience as an encounter between reader and text and of interpretative problems related to each of the major literary genres.

Explores the major reasons people read, ways to engage adolescents in meaningful reading, ways to understand and enhance readers’ meaning-making processes and experiences, and ways to assess adolescents’ reading development over time.

The Reading of Poetry

Writing, Learning, and Adolescents

E11.0193 60 hours: 4 points. Spring.

E11.1601 60 hours: 4 points. Spring.

An introductory course in the reading of poetry, designed to help students improve their abilities to understand, analyze, enjoy, and exercise critical judgment.

Explores the major reasons people write, ways to engage adolescents in meaningful writing, ways to understand and enhance writers’ meaning-making processes and experiences, and ways to assess adolescents’ writing development over time.

Independent Study E11.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged. For description, see page 167.

Intermediate Expository Writing E11.1005 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Designed to help students develop those composing processes and rhetorical strategies needed to generate, focus, present, and polish ideas that clearly inform and powerfully persuade intended audiences.

Advanced Composition E11.1185 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. An advanced course in expository writing for all students, especially those concerned with writing in school settings. Hours are arranged for individual counseling.

Writing in the Social Sciences E11.1191 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Focuses on the principles and practices of successful writing in the social sciences by reading appropriate genres of social science writing (quantitative, qualitative, and literature review); using them as models to understand the stylistic and rhetorical demands of such writing; and practicing writing social science texts in preparation for the senior thesis with an emphasis on writing a literature review. Requirement for Program in Applied Psychological Studies.

Teaching English in a Multidialectal Society E11.1589 60 hours: 4 points. Spring. Examines the variety of speech communities and linguistic codes within contemporary American society and their relationship to language use and learning in schools. Black and Hispanic English vernaculars receive special emphasis. Group projects focus on actual investigations in the area of sociolinguistics and language teaching/learning.

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Observing Teaching and Learning in the English Classroom I E11.1602 240 hours: 8 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E11.1600,1601 or equivalent. Involves hypothesizing appropriate learning goals for middle school students, negotiating and enacting appropriate learning experiences, and assessing pupil learning. This critical analysis of your own teaching of one English class during the semester is designed to promote your development as a reflective practitioner.

Observing Teaching and Learning in the English Classroom II E11.1603 240 hours: 8 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E11.1600,1601 or equivalent. Involves hypothesizing appropriate learning goals for high school students, negotiating and enacting appropriate learning experiences, and assessing pupil learning. This critical analysis of your own teaching of one English class during the semester is designed to promote your development as a reflective practitioner.

E12: MATHEMATICS EDUCATION Fundamentals of Mathematics E12.0001 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. May be counted in lieu of 4 points of the mathematics requirement in liberal arts. Substantial effort is made to reduce or eliminate mathematics anxiety while building a deeper understanding of elementary mathematics and its applications to students’ lives. Mathematical activities and games are used to help students learn and appreciate quantitative reasoning.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E12 Courses • 113

Mathematics for Decision Making E12.0002 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Applications of statistics and probability, necessary for informed decision making, are highlighted. Collecting, interpreting, and analyzing data; examining data from geometric, numerical, and algebraic perspectives; and analyzing the outcomes of events form the foundation for solving problems and making decisions. Instructional strategies make use of various tools, personal interests, and connections with other disciplines.

Independent Study E12.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged. For description, see page 167.

Teaching Elementary School Mathematics I E12.1023 1-2 points. A methods course introducing how to teach mathematics at the elementary level. Use of a variety of manipulatives and the development of concepts and skills.

Mathematical Concepts in Integrated Early Childhood/Special Education Curriculum I E12.1032 1 point. The spatial and temporal experiences of young children. Analysis of activities in early childhood settings that help children develop insight into mathematics both as a study in itself and as a tool for applied use. Focus on the mathematical concepts that infuse young children’s experience, the use of mathematical tools in young children’s learning, methods for adapting math curriculum for learners with diverse abilities, and the relationship of mathematical learning to all areas of curriculum.

Mathematical Concepts in Integrated Early Childhood/Special Education Curriculum II E12.1033 2 points. Analysis of activities in early childhood settings that help children develop insight into mathematics both as a study in itself and as a tool for applied use. Extension of the concepts explored in the preceding course by considering the use of mathematical concepts, methods, and materials in integrated curriculum with more advanced learners.

Teaching About Data and Chance in Grades 7-12

Supervised Student Teaching in Secondary School Mathematics I

E12.1042 45 hours: 3 points.

E12.1077 Curcio, Goldberg. A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 5 points.

Methods of helping students to learn, understand, and apply the concepts and skills of statistics and probability in grades 7 through 12; the use of technology to support and enhance such understanding; and how to assess the learning that has taken place.

Methods of Teaching Secondary School Mathematics E12.1043 45 hours: 3 points. Developing the skills of classroom planning, management, and implementation for effective instructional practices in grades 7 through 12. Topics include lesson plan development and implementation, different models of teaching, assessing student understanding, and the use of instructional technology. Students also visit schools, observe teachers in the classroom, and use these observations as the basis for discussions of effective teaching practice. This course requires a field component where students are involved in tutoring and microteaching.

Teaching About Algebra and Trigonometry in Grades 7-12 E12.1045 45 hours: 3 points. Methods of helping students to learn, understand, and apply the concepts and skills of algebra and trigonometry in grades 7 through 12; the use of technology to support and enhance such understanding; and how to assess the learning that has taken place.

Teaching About Geometry in Grades 7-12 E12.1046 45 hours: 3 points. Methods of helping students to learn, understand, and apply the concepts of skills of geometry in grades 7 through 12; the use of technology to support and enhance such understanding; and how to assess the learning that has taken place.

Students are placed in a regular classroom setting under the guidance of an experienced master teacher. Students are expected to observe different teachers; to work with individual students and small groups of students; to attend department meetings and open school nights where appropriate; and to take over responsibility for one or more classes, including planning lessons, managing the classroom, instruction, and student assessment. This course also includes a weekly seminar of all students enrolled in a student teaching experience in mathematics education.

Supervised Student Teaching in Secondary School Mathematics II E12.1078 Curcio, Goldberg. A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 5 points. Students are placed in a regular classroom setting under the guidance of an experienced master teacher. Students are expected to observe different teachers; to work with individual students and small groups of students; to attend department meetings and open school nights where appropriate; and to take over responsibility for one or more classes, including planning lessons, managing the classroom, instruction, and student assessment. This course also includes a weekly seminar of all students enrolled in a student teaching experience in mathematics education.

The Use of Mathematical Models in the Teaching of Mathematics from Secondary School Through College E12.2103 30 hours: 3 points. Fall. Classroom discussion focuses on what mathematical models are, how and why they are developed, and how to use them to make the mathematics being taught more interesting and more applicable to the real world. Models are developed for a variety of levels and subject areas.

Teaching Precalculus Mathematics E12.1047 45 hours: 3 points. Methods of helping students to learn, understand, and apply the concepts and skills of precalculus; the use of technology to support and enhance such understanding; and how to assess the learning that has taken place.

The Teaching of “Parts,” Grades 7-12

Supervised Student Teaching of Mathematics in the Secondary School

E12.1041 45 hours: 3 points. Alternate fall semesters.

E12.1076*† A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 6 points. Fall, spring.

Teaching about ratios, proportions, percents, decimals, and fractions in grades 7-12.

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NOTES TO COURSES *Registration closed to special students. †See Supervised Student Teaching, page 177. Students must also register with the Student Teaching Office the term before assigned student teaching begins. ‡Pass/fail basis.

114 • E14 to E17 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

E14: SCIENCE EDUCATION Principles of Biology E14.0025 90 hours: 4 points. Fall. The cell and living chemistry are studied in order to understand problems of our daily life. Pollution and diseases affecting the processes of both external and internal respiration are presented. Facets of ecology, photosynthesis, nitrogen cycle, and the food chain are studied in relation to individual and world nutrition. Modern genetics and recombinant DNA are discussed as are the male and female reproductive systems. The laboratory investigations enhance the concepts studied in the lecture.

General Biology I E14.0026 90 hours (with laboratory): 4 points. Fall. Begins with basic chemistry and continues with the cell, photosynthesis, respiration, and genetics. Evolution of plants, animals, and humans are discussed as well as ecology and the earth’s ecosystems.

General Biology II E14.0027 90 hours (with laboratory): 4 points. Spring. The second-semester course reviews cellular respiration and the use of energy and continues with a study of plant groupings and their functions. The course concludes with a study of the human body, its systems, and their functions.

Independent Study

treating disease are also presented. In the laboratory, nonpathogenic bacteria are used to investigate the various means used to identify and control bacteria.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology

This semester course stresses the special senses and the endocrine, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, and urogenital systems. The laboratory follows and enhances the lecture material.

E14.1035 75 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite (strongly recommended): college biology. This course presents a balanced study of the cell, tissues, and the 11 body systems. The laboratory experience follows the lecture syllabus and reinforces it by studies of human models and physiological experiments.

The Teaching of Science in Intermediate and Secondary Schools E14.1039 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. Prerequisites or corequisites: human development and a major in science, or its equivalent, or by permission of instructor. This field-based course takes place in New York City public schools. Throughout the semester an overview of the tools and skills needed by science teachers is provided to organize the learning activities of the students. Students work in collaborative groups on authentic pedagogical problems and activities that enable them to acquire science teaching skills related to the following areas (among others): gender and science; inequality and science; learning theories; safety; planning and curriculum development; classroom management; integration of science with other disciplines; reading and science; traditional and alternative assessment; and multicultural science teaching.

E14.1000* 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged.

Supervised Student Teaching of Science in High School

For description, see page 167.

E14.1046 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 4 points.

The Teaching of Science in the Elementary School I and II E14.1001,1002* 30 hours: 2 points each. Fall, spring. Primarily for ELED and PRE students. Purposes, selection, organization, and guidance of science experiences suitable for children.

Supervised Student Teaching of Science in the Middle School E14.1149*† A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 4 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged.

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Microbiology E14.1023 90 hours: 4 points. Spring. Prerequisites (strongly recommended): a college laboratory course in biology and chemistry. For nursing students; others by permission of instructor. This course introduces the student to the classification and characteristics of bacteria and other protists. Fundamental concepts of control are studied and applied to physical and chemical agents as well as to antibiotics and chemotherapeutic means. The uses of microorganisms in the daily life of humans and in

E14.1170 90 hours: 4 points. Spring. Prerequisite: E14.0025 or equivalent laboratory course in biology. Chemistry recommended. The cellular tissues are studied. The anatomy and physiological processes of the integumentary, skeletal, joints, muscular, and nervous systems are presented in detail. The laboratory follows the lecture plan and stresses living anatomy and physiological investigations to reinforce the lecture materials.

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E14.1171 90 hours: 4 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E14.1170.

E16: QUANTITATIVE STUDIES Basic Statistics I E16.1085 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: a course in algebra. May not be taken concurrently with E16.1086 or E16.1995. Credit is not granted to students who have received credit for E16.1995 (E12.1995). Review of the essential mathematics for statistics. Collection and tabulation of data; the properties of frequency distributions; histograms and frequency polygons; measures of central tendency, dispersion, and correlation; tests of hypotheses using the normal curve, the t distribution, the F distribution, and the chi-square distribution.

Basic Statistics II E16.1086 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: a course in algebra and E16.1085 or E16.1995. May not be taken concurrently with E16.1085 or E16.1995. For description, see E16.1085.

Biostatistics E16.1995 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: a course in algebra. May not be taken concurrently with E16.1085,1086. Credit is not granted for E16.1995 for students who have taken E16.1085. The collection, tabulation, and elementary analysis of vital statistics. Sources and uses of population, mortality, and morbidity data. Classification and tabulation, frequency distribution, measures of location and variation, rates and ratios, correlations and regression, and tests of significance using the normal curve, the t distribution, and the chi-square distribution. Illustrations and examples taken from the health professions.

E17: EDUCATIONAL THEATRE Stagecraft I and II E17.0009,0010 60 hours: 2-4 points each term. Fall, spring. Credit is not granted to students who have received credit for E17.1009. Comprehensive, practical course in the various technical aspects of theatrical production. Fall term explores

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E17 Courses • 115

the planning, construction, and painting of scenery and the architecture of the stage. Spring term deals with stage electrics, lighting, crafts, sound technology, and special effects. Three additional hours of practical laboratory a week.

Independent Study

Acting I

Introduction to Theatre for Young Audiences

E17.0027,0028 60 hours: 3-4 points each term. Fall, spring.

E17.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged. For description, see page 167.

ties in elementary and secondary education and with adults. Laboratory experience recommended.

Methods of Conducting Creative Dramatics E17.1067 45 hours: 3 points. May be repeated for a total of 6 points. Spring.

E17.1005,1006 30 hours: 2 points each term. Fall, spring.

Techniques and practice of creative drama. Students lead classes; weekly critiques. Laboratory experience.

Play and audience analysis, directing methods, production techniques. Each student plans a complete children’s theatre production. Laboratory experience recommended.

Dramatic Activities in the Secondary Classroom

Acting II

Design for the Stage

E17.0037,0038 90 hours: 3-4 points each term. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: satisfactory work in E17.0027,0028 or equivalent and permission of adviser.

E17.1017 15-45 hours: 1-3 points. Fall.

Theories and practices of educational drama and theatre as applied to the secondary classroom in such areas as learning processes, motivation, communication, and classroom management. Attention given to the relationship of drama and theatre to speaking, thinking, writing, reading, history, and other curricular subjects. An examination of improvisational techniques as well as play production. Students use drama and theatre to address the human developmental processes that impact on the grades 7-12 students’ readiness to learn, such as culture, nutrition, personal safety, and community.

Class hours are spent in the practice of improvisation, pantomime, and theatre games as well as brief scenes. Three additional hours a week involve rehearsal and performance of scenes on Friday afternoons or major productions.

Fall term deals with scene study, rehearsal approaches, and audition techniques for actors. Spring term focuses on characterization and dramatic relationships. Additional hours of rehearsal each week.

Introduction to Educational Theatre I E17.0050 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. An examination of the major periods of theatre history from the ancient Greeks to the 19th century in the United States. An analysis of the dramatic structures that relate these periods to the discipline of educational theatre. Different perspectives to give a comprehensive view of the role of theatre as a foundation to educational theatre. Students develop a knowledge and understanding of strategies employed in educational theatre and an appreciation of the aesthetics of theatre and drama. Language acquisition and literacy development through listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.

Introduction to Educational Theatre II E17.0051 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. An examination of the major periods of theatre history from the beginnings of modern theatre to postmodern theatre and performance art. An analysis of the dramatic structures that relate these periods to the discipline of educational theatre. Different perspectives to give a comprehensive view of the role of theatre as a foundation to educational theatre. Students develop a knowledge and understanding of strategies employed in educational theatre and an appreciation of the aesthetics of theatre and drama. Language acquisition and literacy development through listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.

Design for today’s stage in period and modern styles. Methods of originating and presenting a design conception. Practice in scene sketching. Three hours of laboratory a week.

Dramatic Activities in the Elementary Classroom E17.1029 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Laboratory experience required: 15 hours.

E17.1068 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. Laboratory experience required: 15 hours.

Methods and materials for role-playing, story dramatization, mask, puppetry, and improvisation as applied to the elementary classroom in such areas as learning processes, motivation, communication, and classroom management. Relationship of drama and theatre to the elementary curriculum. Students use drama and theatre to address the human development processes that impact on the K-6 child’s readiness to learn, such as culture, nutrition, personal safety, and community.

Masks and Puppetry

Character Study and Motivation

Directing

E17.1051 60 hours: 3-4 points.

E17.1081,1082 90 hours: 3-4 points each term. Fall, spring.

A practical exploration of theories and methods of building a character. Utilization of numerous theories from Stanislavski or Brecht including improvisation, animal imagery, sensory awareness, and the application of these approaches to text. Acting I or equivalent required.

E17.1079 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Credit is not granted to students who have received credit for E17.2061. Historical and practical experience in basic mask- and puppet-making techniques. Exploration of the uses of masks and puppets and their importance in theatre. Laboratory three hours a week.

Elements of play scripts are analyzed and dramatized. Students cast and rehearse members of the acting classes in brief scenes performed at workshop meetings on Friday afternoons. Class assignments include rehearsal.

Masters of Modern Drama

Styles of Acting and Directing

E17.1057,1058 45 hours: 3 points each term. Fall, spring.

E17.1099,1100 45 hours: 3 points each term. Fall, spring.

Students read major plays representing innovative forms in modern theatre. Movements from Ibsen, Chekhov, and Strindberg to dramatists of today are related to styles of theatrical presentation.

Scenes from period plays (Greek, Roman, Elizabethan, neoclassical French, Restoration, 18th- and 19th-century European) are studied and acted. A course in performance styles and techniques for actors, directors, designers, teachers, and those interested in theatre history and criticism. Additional hours of rehearsal.

Theory of Creative Drama E17.1065 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. The philosophy underlying informal dramatics and materials for conducting improvised dramatic activi-

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116 • E17 to E20 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Music Theatre: Background and Analysis E17.1101,1102 30 hours and hours arranged: 3 points each term. Fall, spring. An analysis of the various forms of music theatre with emphasis on the libretto, lyrics, and production elements. Musicals past and present are examined and critically evaluated. Written critiques of current musicals are required; costs of tickets are the responsibility of students.

sis of student teaching in the secondary classroom is designed to promote the student’s development as a reflective practitioner. Based on the completion of 45 hours per point.

Costume Design E17.1175 45-60 hours: 3-4 points. Spring. Costume design for the modern stage and the history of fashion. Three hours of practical laboratory a week.

Theatre-in-Education Practices Beginning Playwriting E17.1105 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Principles and methods of playwriting. Completion of several writing assignments is required, including a one-act play. Plays of special merit considered for program production.

Physical Theatre Improvisation E17.1113 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Techniques for performing and teaching pantomime. Training in body control, gesture, and facial expressiveness. While basically a performance course, the history of mime as a theatre art is examined, and significant examples of Eastern and Western styles are studied.

Student Teaching: Theatre in the Elementary Classroom E17.1134 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 4 points. Supervised student teaching in elementary classroom settings, followed by scheduled conferences with field supervisor. Seminar addresses formal and informal methods of assessing student learning and the means of analyzing one’s own teaching practice. Student teachers observe, plan, teach, and evaluate drama and theatre activities integrated across the elementary school curriculum, N-6. Based on the completion of 45 hours per point.

Stage Lighting E17.1143 45-60 hours: 3-4 points. Fall. Theories of light and lighting. The practice of lighting the stage. Experiments with light as a design element. Laboratory experience required.

Student Teaching: Theatre in the Secondary Classroom E17.1174 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 4 points. Supervised student teaching in secondary classroom settings, grades 7-12, followed by scheduled conferences with field supervisor. Seminar involves developing appropriate goals, negotiating and enacting appropriate learning experiences, and assessing student learning in drama and theatre activities. The critical analy-

tutions. Emphasis is on group location projects from script to screen; production management; use of onehalf inch production, editing, and graphics technology; and on genres and formats of effective educational video programs.

E17.2090 30 hours: 3 points. Spring. A production course for teachers, recreation leaders, language specialists, actors, directors, and students of educational theatre. Focuses on the creation and performance of projects with special educational content. Students survey the history of T.I.E. programs, as well as research, devise, and present their own original productions.

Drama in Education I, II E17.2193,2194 30 hours: 3 points each term. Fall, spring. Relationships of theories of dramatic art to general educational principles; present practices and potential of educational drama at all levels of instruction. Uses of theatre and drama in education from the Greeks to the present day. The history and philosophy of drama in education as they relate to a variety of classroom strategies, including the use of new technologies. The impact of human developmental processes, such as culture, personal safety, and nutrition on learning through theatre and drama. Individualizing instruction to prepare students with special needs for their highest levels of achievement.

Communication with Video: Advanced Projects E19.1031 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Recommended for nonmajors. Advanced analysis and production of nonbroadcast educational video programs for schools, corporate communications, the professions, cultural and public service institutions. Emphasis is on group location and studio projects; scriptwriting, production management, editing, and graphics; and on the structure, design, and aesthetics of effective educational video programs. Student projects are broadcast on NYU-TV.

Telecommunications and Educational Applications: Systems, Services, and Networks E19.1250 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Information transmission technologies, services, and networks connecting individuals and groups to others and to resources at a distance, and their applications in the fields of education and training. These include cable, satellite, fiber optic systems, distance learning, teleconferencing, videotext, electronic mail, databases, and other on-line services. Design, implementation, and potential to support learning are examined through case studies and small-scale student projects.

E20: SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION Independent Study

E19: EDUCATIONAL COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY

E20.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged.

Computer Literacy

An Introduction to the Sociology of Education

E19.1001 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Introduction to wide-ranging aspects and demonstrations of the computer, its structure and operations; languages, programs, systems, and procedures; specialized uses, applications, and services. Critical analysis of its impact on culture and society, the professions, and individuals. Develop computer literacy and skills to use several applications. IBM-PCs are used.

Communication with Video: Introduction

For description, see page 167.

E20.1002 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Study of basic sociological concepts such as status, role, and bureaucracy as they apply to the institution of education. Examination of current perspectives and research findings about the social aspects of the learning process. This course satisfies the state certification requirement in lieu of E20.0002.

Education as a Social Institution

E19.1030 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Recommended for nonmajors.

E20.1015 30 hours plus 15 hours arranged in field participation experiences: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer.

Analysis and production of nonbroadcast educational video programs for schools, corporate communications, the professions, cultural and public service insti-

Part of the common pedagogical core, this course provides an introduction to the social foundations of education. The structure of education in terms of the

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E20 to E21 Courses • 117

rights and responsibilities of teachers, administrators, community members, and policymakers in relation to the rest of the society is explored from both legal and sociological points of view. Comparisons to education and schooling in other countries are made. The study of particular school and professional issues includes diversity, student variability, bilingualism, and special education in terms of their effects on policy, practice, and student and teacher rights.

The Sociology of Urban Life and Education E20.1025 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Processes of urban growth and change; economic, political, social, and psychological consequences of urban growth and change processes, especially as regards education.

The Sociology of Work and Occupations E20.1026 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Sociological approaches to work and occupations in modern society. Theories of the nature of society (modern, industrial, postindustrial) are considered and relation of theories to class system, family, and education are considered along with work settings.

E21: SPEECH AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION Gender Differences in Communication E21.0001 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring (first and second seven weeks of term). Does gender influence the ability to communicate? According to recent studies, gender plays a powerful role in how we are perceived by others and often influences the way we communicate with others. This course enables students to understand how to deal with sex roles and sex role development as they affect the ability to communicate in everyday life.

Communication in Conflict Solving E21.0002 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring (first and second seven weeks of each term); summer. Conflict is a part of our personal and professional lives. By understanding the dynamics of confrontation, we can deal effectively with conflicts when they occur and possibly prevent conflicts from occurring. This course provides students with the practical skills and the theoretical background necessary for handling conflicts.

Communication and Public Relations

Interviewing Strategies

E21.0003 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring (first and second seven weeks of each term); summer.

E21.0010 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring (first and second seven weeks of each term); summer.

Public relations means different things to different people but it has one undeniable element: communication. This course is concerned with arranging, handling, and evaluating public relations programs. Students work with actual case histories and deal with contemporary topics such as the use of the computer in public relations.

This course focuses on the principles and practices of successful interviewing techniques. Students are provided with background on the structure of an interview and learn how to analyze success and/or potential problems. Review of case studies and practice in holding interviews enable students to gain experience and to improve their own abilities.

Speech for International Students and Nonnative Speakers of English

Nonverbal Communication

E21.0005 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring, summer. For undergraduate students. A speech improvement course especially designed for international students who wish a phonetic analysis of their language usage and practice in modifying their accents. Hours are arranged for student evaluation and practice.

Listening E21.0007 15 hours: 1 point. Fall (first seven weeks of term); summer. Students evaluate their own listening skills and discuss the various factors that affect listening ability and how crucial effective listening is to professional and personal success. Through case study and practical application, students learn how to strengthen their own listening ability.

New Dimensions in Communication: The Communications Consultant in Corporate America E21.0008 15 hours: 1 point. Spring. Identifies strategies for the communications consultant in corporate America. Survey of the kinds of consulting that occurs and professional opportunities available. Strategies are provided for making the transition from academic to corporate arenas.

New Dimensions in Communication: Communication for Professionals E21.0009 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring (first and second seven weeks of each term). Topic both terms: Communication for Professionals. Effective communication within organizations requires an understanding of the various communication dimensions that exist within professional frameworks. The course endeavors to give students this understanding through the discussion and practical experiences in technology and communications, teleconferencing, the interview, group and individual presentations in television studio setting, and defining the professional environment.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E21.0012 15 hours: 1 point. Spring (second seven weeks of term). It is estimated that what we say without words comprises up to 65 percent of what we mean. In this course, students learn how to identify and interpret gestures and facial expressions and to understand the implications of the power that underlies all nonverbal communication. Topics for discussion include the meaning of body language, the uses of space, touching behavior, eye contact, and paralanguage. Through such understanding, students gain greater awareness of and insight into their own behavior and into the behavior of others.

Cross-Cultural Communication E21.0013 15 hours: 1 point. Spring (first and second seven weeks of term). Consideration is given to verbal and nonverbal communication processes in United States culture as compared and contrasted with other interacting cultures; stereotypes resulting from differences in communication; and intervention strategies designed to strengthen effective intercultural communication.

Communication in Organizational Settings E21.0014 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring (second seven weeks of each term). This course is designed especially for students entering business, health care, and educational settings who are assuming or aspiring to positions of leadership. Through case studies and class discussion, course work focuses on strengthening communication competency in presentation skills, persuasive ability (i.e., marketing and sales), leadership in meetings, and problem-solving skills.

Voice and Diction E21.0032 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Analysis of student’s voice and diction; elements of the speaking voice; study of English sounds, stress, and intonation; application of principles. Foreign students who are not fluent in English should register for E21.0005 or E21.1005. Hours are arranged for student evaluation and practice.

118 • E21 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Speech Communication E21.0033 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Theories of communication; fundamentals of spoken communication with projects in discussion, speaking, reading, and dialogue; oral and nonverbal factors; principles and practice in listening; interpersonal and group interaction.

Phonetics and Phonemics of American English

Speech for International Students and Nonnative Speakers of English E21.1005 30-45 hours: 2-3 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. For description, see E21.0005.

Listening E21.1007 15-20 hours: 1-2 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

E21.0061 45 hours: 3 points. Fall.

For description, see E21.0007.

A study of the production, description, and classification of speech sounds; English sounds, stress, and intonation; phonemes and allophones, ear training, phonetic and phonemic transcription.

New Dimensions in Communication: The Communications Consultant in Corporate America

Introduction to Rhetoric

E21.1008 15 hours: 1-2 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

E21.0130 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring.

For description, see E21.0008.

A historic view of rhetorical theory from the ancients (Plato, Aristotle, Quintillian) to the modern (Bruke, Weaver, Toulmin). The primary applications of the theory are to contemporary speakers and the nature of American political rhetoric. Questions addressed range from “What is rhetoric?” to “What made the Declaration of Independence persuasive?” to “Why (and how) does the government lie to us?”

New Dimensions in Communication: Communication for Professionals E21.1009 15-20 hours: 1-2 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. For description, see E21.0009.

Interviewing Strategies

Group Discussion E21.1015 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Examines the principles and techniques involved in group problem-solving and decision-making tasks. Class projects are used to practice the application of the fundamentals and implementation of specific strategies. Hours are arranged for student projects and practice.

Political Rhetoric E21.1019 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. Looking at the rhetoric of public relations, we examine the principles and assumptions in analyzing the process of political campaigns. Focus is on an analysis of what is reported to the mass media and not the “gatekeepers,” reporters, editors, and producers of news who filter the messages. Also, discussion on how public relations helps create the viewpoints that eventually become well established and widely held.

Public Relations Techniques: Nonprofit Sector E21.1020 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring (second seven weeks of the term). Focus on all aspects of communication in public relations for the nonprofit sector. Students learn to question, examine, and solve public relations problems endemic to the nonprofit sector.

Introduction to Rhetorical Criticism

E21.1010 15 hours per point: 1-2 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

E21.0132 60 hours: 4 points. Fall spring.

For description, see E21.0010.

Communication and Advertising

Public Speaking

E21.1021 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring.

E21.1011 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring, summer.

Understanding the communication strategies and fundamentals of effective advertising and the use of advertising communication tools. The emphasis is on techniques, preparation of materials, and the ability to assess the effectiveness of these strategies.

An introduction to the art of evaluating speeches. Application of the rhetorical theories—from Aristotle to postmodernism—to famous 20th-century speeches (Kennedy’s “Inaugural,” Reagan’s “Star Wars,” etc.).

Independent Study E21.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged.

Analysis of the problems of speaking to groups and practice in preparing and presenting speeches for various purposes and occasions. Hours are arranged for student evaluation and practice.

For description, see page 167.

Nonverbal Communication Gender Differences in Communication E21.1001 15-20 hours: 1-2 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

E21.1012 15 hours per point: 1-2 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. For description, see E21.0012.

For description, see E21.0001.

Cross-Cultural Communication Communication in Conflict Solving E21.1002 15-20 hours: 1-2 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

E21.1003 15 hours per point: 1 point. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. For description, see E21.0003.

E21.1022 60 hours: 4 points. Spring. Understanding the interrelationships between mediated communication and public relations. Course focuses on the electronic media and assesses the impact of these media on public relations marketing campaigns.

E21.1013 15 hours per point: 1-2 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Public Relations: Written Communication for the Media

For description, see E21.0013.

E21.1023 60 hours: 4 points. Spring.

For description, see E21.0002.

Communication and Public Relations

Public Relations in the Electronic Media

Communication in Organizational Settings E21.1014 15 hours per point: 1-2 points. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. For description, see E21.0014.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The communication skills called for by every mass medium require training. Therefore, the emphasis of this course is on teaching writing principles and patterns in the various media forms. Students learn, as modern mass communicators, the principles of writing for impact, information, and persuasion.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E21 to E23 Courses • 119

Advanced Advertising Strategies

Interpersonal Communication

E21.1024 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring.

E21.1191 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring, summer.

This course teaches students who have taken a basic advertising course on how to develop a complete advertising campaign for a product, service, or nonprofit organization.

The application of various systems of communication analysis to specific behavioral situations. Through the case-study method, students apply communication theories and models to practical, everyday situations.

Argumentation and Debate E21.1075 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. Prerequisite: speech course or senior standing. Analysis of the problems inherent in arguing and debating; the development of analytical tools for argument; practice in the application and preparation of analysis through debating. Hours are arranged for student evaluation and practice.

Conflict Management Communication E21.1081 45-60 hours: 3-4 points. Fall. Effective communication plays a critical role in addressing, defusing, and managing conflict in professional and personal settings. Through case studies, students learn how factors such as ethnicity, oral and nonverbal communication, gender, culture, and writing contribute to conflict and how we can learn to assess, manage, and defuse conflicts productively.

Communication Competencies in the Mediation Process E21.1082 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Mediation is an alternative to violence, self-help, and litigation. It is a process in which parties with a dispute settle it with the mediator. Students acquire the communication competencies and an understanding of the process that enables the parties to live peacefully in the future. Students also develop mediation objectives and strategies and execute a mediation session.

Persuasion E21.1083 60 hours: 4 points. Spring. Prerequisite: speech course or senior standing. Analysis of factors inherent in the persuasive process; examination and application of these factors in presentations. Hours are arranged for student evaluation and practice.

The Art of Narration E21.1127 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Practice in storytelling techniques and extensive study of materials. Hours are arranged for student evaluation and practice.

E23: INTERNATIONAL AND SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION Contemporary Problems: Educational Reform and Social Education E23.0062 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. This course examines various educational reform efforts as they relate to social education. Focusing on urban schooling, the course analyzes issues such as segregation in schools, tracking, school choice, educational equity, the debate over core and multicultural curricula and the alternate school movement. A comparison of American schooling in the context of global education is examined. Required course for social studies undergraduates.

Teaching Social Studies in the Middle School E23.1037 30 hours: 2 points. Prerequisites: E27.1050 and E23.1135. Must be taken with E23.1045. A practical examination of specific teaching problems and practices as they relate to middle school social studies education. Class sessions are based on student teaching experiences.

Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary School E23.1039* 30 hours: 2 points. Prerequisites: E27.1050 and E23.1135. Must be taken with E23.1046. A practical examination of specific teaching problems and practices as they relate to secondary school social studies education. Class sessions are based on student teaching experiences.

Supervised Student Teaching of Social Studies in the Middle School E23.1045 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 4 points. Prerequisites: E27.1050 and E23.1135. Must be taken with E23.1037. A minimum of 20 days (100 hours) of supervised student teaching of social studies in a middle school.

Supervised Student Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School E23.1046 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 4 points. Prerequisites: E27.1050 and E23.1135. Must be taken with E23.1039. A minimum of 20 days (100 hours) of supervised student teaching of social studies in a secondary school.

Post-1865 U.S. History, Geography, and the Social Studies E23.1073 60 hours: 4 points. Surveys key developments in American civilization since the Civil War. Explores the rise of the United States to world power; the impact of industrialization, mass immigration, and urbanization on American society; the evolution of the political system; reform and radical dissent; and the role that race, class, and gender played in post-1865 U.S. history. Combines historical and geographical analysis of the United States, introducing cultural and physical geography as tools for studying and teaching the American past.

Participatory Democracy, Service Learning, and the Social Studies E23.1090 60 hours: 4 points. Explores the problems and possibilities for democracy in teaching and research in the social studies. Examines theories of participatory democracy and their implications for education. Emphasis on curriculum and program organization aimed at models of citizenship and democratic participation such as service learning and the effects on curriculum, organization, and leadership. What should the purposes of social studies and interdisciplinary education be in a democracy? What conceptions of the “good citizen” are embedded in different visions of social studies teaching? What knowledge, skills, and perspectives are important in service learning curriculum? How can we research and assess these goals?

Current Trends and Problems in Secondary Social Studies Education E23.1135 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Social studies as a field is reviewed historically and its theoretical base is analyzed. Examines the nature of socialization inherent in different concepts of knowledge and introduces the problems of selecting, organizing, and teaching various approaches to history and the social sciences.

Global History, Geography, and the Social Studies E23.1800 60 hours: 4 points. Surveys central themes, institutions, and events in world history. Emphasis is on cross-cultural syncretism, economic interaction, the growth of universal

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

120 • E23 to E24 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

religions, and geographical perspectives on key historical issues. Regionalism is explored and the impact of modern economic developments, technology, and worldwide ideologies examined. Combines historical and geographical analysis, introducing cultural and physical geography as tools for studying and teaching world history.

New York Politics and Community Studies in the Social Studies E23.1925 60 hours: 4 points. Every semester the course focuses on a different community in New York City (e.g., the Lower East Side, East Harlem, or Williamsburg) and examines the political forces, social conditions, and historical circumstances that make it what it is today. NYU students conduct field research in collaboration with middle or high school students who live in the neighborhood, and they write neighborhood-focused social studies curricula for the use of neighborhood schools. In the process, they study methods of research, curriculum issues, and conceptions of the role of “social study” in the middle-school and high-school curriculum.

E24: GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY Independent Study E24.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged.

The Buying of Printing and Graphic Communications Products E24.1203 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Focus is on the purchasing function of a corporation. Discussion centers on such topics as training and compensating the purchasing director; the place of price; the practicality of bidding every job; the team concept of buyer and seller; how to select a vendor; the buyer’s open-door policy.

Print and Human Experience E24.1204 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. An overview of print as a function of communication and of its impact on society. Examines theories of graphic communication and the persuasive power of print. Topics include hieroglyphics; typographic communication; graphic design for visual communication; the print revolution in modern Europe; the role of print communication for persuasion; electronic publishing; and electronic threats to print.

Marking Time: From Writing to Print to Visual Bookmaking E24.1205 60 hours: 4 points. Spring. Evolutionary stages of diverse writing and bookmaking practices. From the first record-keeping necessities through biblical texts and medieval book practices, to mechanical reproductions and the transformation from print to the computer age. Cultural and social impact of these traditions are examined.

For description, see page 167.

Graphic Communications Management

Electronic Publishing Seminar: Print in Revolution

E24.1101 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring.

E24.1304 45 hours: 3 points. Fall.

An intensive study of effective management techniques. Emphasizes the accomplishments, results, and areas of concern that managers confront. Topics include organizational theory, leadership evaluation, development, and planning.

This course attends to changes in “printerly” practices and gives theoretical and managerial overviews of the impact of this rapidly emerging new publishing industry. Significant development of this fast-developing field covered through lectures, discussion, demonstration of systems, guest speakers, and selected readings.

Management Perspectives on the Estimating of Printing E24.1201 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Students must be well versed in printing technologies and terminology in order to register for this course. An in-depth analysis of the systems and management procedures that generate accurate cost estimations in the production of printed material. Estimating procedures are given for paper, type, art preparation, prepress assembly, platemaking, sheetfed and web offset press production, and binding and finishing.

Graphic Communications Projects: Concept Through Execution E24.1340 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Focus is on the workflow process, from creative concept through execution in a variety of projects in graphic communications management. Class projects include the development of Web sites, newsletters, and advertising and promotional campaigns.

Color Reproduction E24.1402 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. An in-depth study to provide the graphics manager with a definitive and professional understanding of (1) how the principles of color relate to the systems of color separation and the printing process; (2) the photographic and electronic scanning methods of color

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

separation; and (3) the practical conditions of color masking, communication, color correction, and quality control in printing.

Graphic Communication I: Design and Persuasion E24.1501 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Juniors and seniors. Principles, procedures, and processes involved in graphic communication. Topics include image communication, principles of design and persuasion, use of light and color, typography and layout, photography and digital imaging, workflow, and preparation of data for production in various forms of graphic media.

Graphic Communication II: Print and Web Media E24.1502 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Juniors and seniors. Processes used in the reproduction of printed materials and electronic graphic communication. Topics include color separation theory, scanners and image processing, paper and substrates, printing inks, proofing, platemaking, press production, and electronic/ondemand printing, Internet, and image processing.

Foundational Tools in Electronic Publishing E24.1601 45 hours and hours arranged: 3 points. Fall, spring. Juniors and seniors. Basic introduction and hands-on experience in electronic publishing: a week-by-week approach to learning tools and technologies and discussion on their impact on how we communicate, express visual ideas, and present information. Students produce simple illustrations and announcements and design and lay out publications for reproduction through learning basic graphic design programs as well as practicing scanning skills and understanding Photoshop.

Dynamic Structures in Electronic Publishing E24.1602 45 hours and hours arranged: 3 points. Fall, spring. Juniors and seniors. The forms and uses of new electronic publishing technologies are explored in a laboratory context of experimentation and discussion. Focus is on sharpening technological skills to produce larger projects for reproduction. Advanced techniques in Photoshop, QuarkXpress, and Adobe Illustrator.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E24 to E25 Courses • 121

Web Site Development: Mapping a Terrain E24.1604 45 hours and hours arranged: 3 points. Fall, spring. Examines and provides hands-on skills to the new and ever-expanding technology. Topics include basic HTML skills as well as managerial and marketing processes central to Internet publishing.

Magazine Editing I E24.1901 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. The supervisory role and responsibility of the editor in magazine publishing. Topics include working effectively with freelance writers; coordinating with art, circulation, production, advertising, and publicity departments; establishing and staying within editorial budgets; source and fact checking; creating effective display copy; the processes of writing and styling copy; planning and scheduling future issues; achieving an editorial style.

Magazine Publishing Management E24.1916 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. The function and responsibilities of the publisher and the business staff of a magazine. Examines consumer and trade magazine case histories. Topics include changes in the publishing business cycle; industry structure, characteristics, and evolution; the competitive nature of the magazine business; trends in new publications; economic considerations and changes in revenue patterns.

E25: EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Orientation to Early Childhood and Elementary Education School Visitations E25.0087 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Provides opportunities to become familiar with organized patterns of instructions in this area through visiting schools and other agencies for children and through analyses of programs and practices together with their rationales.

Independent Study E25.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged. For description, see page 167.

Principles and Practices of Montessori Education I E25.1002 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. Registration by permission of instructor.

Emphasis is on comparison of the Montessori approach to other belief systems and development of competencies in designing practical life classroom activities.

Learning and Experience in Family, School, and Community II

Principles and Practices of Montessori Education II

For description, see E25.1019.

E25.1003 60 hours: 4 points. Spring. For description, see E25.1002.

Integrating Seminar in Childhood and Special Education I—Context and Learning Environments of Diverse Learners E25.1005 1 point. A seminar course designed to encourage the integration of theory and practice, taken concurrently with first semester of field placement.

E25.1020 30 hours: 2 points. Spring.

Integrated Curricula in Early Childhood/Special Education I: Science, Social Studies, Drama, and Art E25.1024 2 points. The interconnections between the subject areas of early childhood learning through the planning and implementation of integrated science, health, social studies, dramatic, and artistic learning experiences. The integration of literacy and mathematical learning into these curricula and the critical role of the physical environment in supporting integrated curriculum.

Integrating Seminar in Childhood and Special Education II: Assessment to Guide Instruction

Integrated Curricula in Early Childhood/Special Education II: Science, Social Studies, Movement, and Music

E25.1006 1 point.

E25.1026 2 points.

A seminar course designed to encourage the integration of theory and practice, taken concurrently with first semester of student teaching.

Continues the development of integrated curriculum by exploring the relationships between science, health, social studies, movement, and music. Again, literacy and mathematical learning and the role of the environment are included in the integrative planning.

Integrating Seminar in Childhood and Special Education III: Curricular Design and Instruction for Diverse Learners E25.1007 1 point. A seminar course designed to encourage the integration of theory and practice, taken concurrently with second semester of student teaching.

Integrating Seminar in Childhood and Special Education IV: Professional Development and Collaboration with Parents and Other Professionals E25.1008 1 point. A seminar course designed to encourage the integration of theory and practice, taken concurrently with last semester of student teaching.

Learning and Experience in Family, School, and Community I E25.1019 2 points. Introduction to the development of curriculum for young learners in diverse settings. Topics include early childhood environments; linguistic and cultural diversity; early language and learning in family, school, and community settings; and working collaboratively with families to create learning environments responsive to the needs of all children.

Focus on the educational theory and key elements of the Montessori approach to early childhood education.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Curriculum in Social Studies in Childhood Education I, II E25.1031,1032 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Prerequisite: a course in child development or the equivalent. Social studies for cognitive and social development in nursery, kindergarten, and elementary school children. Emphasis placed on content, strategies, and materials for developing concepts and skills. Includes assessing learning, individualizing instruction, finding and using resources, and integrating other curriculum areas.

Language Arts in Childhood Education E25.1060 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: one term in child development or equivalent. (Course required of students who seek American Montessori Society certification. Please consult with program director before enrolling.) Children’s oral and written language, handwriting, spelling, reading, and literature related to the elementary curriculum.

Writing for Children E25.1075 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Teaching of writing for children as an art form to include analysis of outstanding examples of children’s books, familiarity with the major divisions in which

122 • E25 to E27 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

children’s books are published; preparation and submission of manuscripts for children’s book production. Consultations with children’s book editors, authors, and other representatives of book publication.

Integrated Curricula in Math, Science, and Social Studies in Childhood Education I, II

self-analysis. Students are expected to apply principles and skills in their fieldwork.

E25.1142,1143 3 points each semester.

Integrated Arts in Childhood Education

Thematic teaching across the curriculum modeled in integrated curricula. Teaching methodologies specific to individual content areas of math, science, and social studies are taught in modules and simultaneously integrated through class activities and fieldbased projects.

Supervised Student Teaching in Childhood Education, 1-6

E25.1080 30 hours: 2 points. Methods of integrating music, art, dance, and drama into an integrated childhood education curriculum.

Introduction to Early Childhood and Special Education

Language and Literacy

E25.1103 2 points.

E25.1175 2-3 points.

Introduction to the fields of early childhood education and early childhood special education. Topics include historical, political, and economic contexts of early childhood and early childhood special education; philosophies and models of early childhood and early childhood special education; the role of the child in society; and the locations of institutions of early childhood learning.

Considers the relationships between young children’s language development and the acquisition of literacy. Explores the nature of language, language development, language diversity, early reading and writing development, and the deep connection of language and literacy to all areas of learning.

Microcomputer Applications in Early Childhood and Elementary Education I

E25.1176 2-3 points.

Language and Reading Instruction in Early Childhood

Choosing and using software appropriate to the special needs of early childhood and elementary education settings; practical problems in using a microcomputer; theoretical considerations in developing interactive support materials for instructional programs; planning for the integration of the microcomputer into the ongoing curriculum.

Teaching the language-related processes with special focus on developmental listening, speaking, reading, and writing for native English language speakers and students who are English language learners. Varied approaches to teaching reading in early childhood programs are presented and tied to other curriculum areas. Students apply concepts by working with children to develop reading skills at developmentally appropriate levels.

Microcomputer Applications in Early Childhood and Elementary Education II

Language and Reading Instruction for Childhood I

E25.1133 45 hours: 3 points. Spring.

E25.1177 2 points.

Choosing and using software appropriate to early childhood and elementary settings: handling practical problems in using a microcomputer; developing interactive support materials for instructional software; integrating microcomputers into the ongoing curriculum. Emphasis on database development and management; developing problem-solving and thinking skills; making maps, charts, and graphs; and processing ideas with a computer. Special attention given to social studies and environmental education applications.

Extends the language-related processes with special focus on developmental reading and writing. Varied approaches to teaching reading in elementary school programs are introduced. Students apply concepts by working with children in their field placements to develop reading skills at developmentally appropriate levels.

E25.1132 45 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Integrated Curricula in Science, Health, and Social Studies in Childhood Education E25.1141 2 points. Thematic teaching across the curriculum modeled in integrated curricula. Teaching methodologies specific to individual content areas of science, health, and social studies are taught in modules and simultaneously integrated through class activities and fieldbased projects.

Language and Reading Instruction for Childhood II E25.1178 1 point. Continuation of Language and Reading Instruction for Childhood I.

Study of Teaching E25.1351 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Students study the process of teaching through real and simulated situations. Emphasis on teacher roles, behavior, alternative teaching models, and decision making in the teaching-learning process. Students are videotaped twice in their placements for purposes of

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E25.1354 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 2 points. Supervised student teaching in classroom settings.

Supervised Student Teaching in Childhood Education, 1-6 E25.1355 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 3 points. Supervised student teaching in classroom settings.

Supervised Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education E25.1357 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 3-7 points. Number of points set by program requirements. Supervised student teaching with children from birth through second grade in nursery schools, childcare centers, Head Start and Early Head Start, and public and private schools.

E27: TEACHING AND LEARNING Inquiries into Teaching and Learning I E27.0001 60 hours plus 15 hours of classroom observation/participation: 4 points. Fall. Explores two themes: learners and learning and teachers and teaching. Students are introduced to teaching and learning by reconstructing, critiquing, and sharing their own educational histories and by reading and responding to the autobiographies and memoirs of learners and teachers of diverse backgrounds, needs, and experiences. Focuses on ways to promote and assess learning, support learners’ interests, foster effective communication, honor diversity, create democratic learning environments, and enable teachers to fulfill their responsibility to self, school, community, and others. By applying relevant professional literature to their microteaching and their observations in school settings, students examine how the classroom context shapes the acquisition of knowledge, attitudes, and skills.

Field Observations in Schools and Other Educational Settings E27.0005 30 hours of field observations: 1 point. Taken concurrently with E03.0001. Fall, spring. Structured observation/participation experiences in a variety of educational environments to introduce new students in the teacher education programs to a range of teaching and learning situations.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E27 to E29 Courses • 123

Inquiries into Teaching and Learning II E27.1002 60 hours plus 15 hours of field experience: 4 points. Spring. Focuses on the themes knowledge and knowing and schools and schooling. Builds on students’ extensive and continuing field experiences as the basis for a critical examination of how the academic disciplines, the school organization, and the curriculum contribute to teaching and learning. Students explore how knowledge is constructed, how literacy skills are developed and contribute to what pupils come to know, and how the individuals learn and interact in formal and nonformal educational settings.

Integrating English and History with Adolescents E27.1020 60 hours: 4 points. Explores how major concepts and processes of English and history can illuminate and support each other. Involves designing thematic explorations in the humanities that enable adolescents to develop a deep understanding of English and history. Explores the role of language and literacy in teaching and learning both disciplines and developing student writing skills. Considers the benefits and potential problems involved in trying to create and enact an integrated curriculum.

Language Acquisition and Literacy Education in a Multilingual and Multicultural Context E27.1030 60 hours: 4 points. Children acquire language through the transactions between their brains and the human worlds around them. This course helps students explore the first and second language acquisition processes and their implications for the acquisition and development of literacy skills, with a particular focus on both remedial and developmental processes for acquiring advanced reading and writing skills in middle childhood and adolescence. Emphasis is also placed on the varieties of language acquisition processes, including normal and delayed acquisition, growing up bilingual and/or bidialectal, and the effects of preschool exposure to literacy.

Classroom Practicum: Planning, Assessment, Management, and Technology

eration. The uses of technology as an instructional tool to support information acquisition and communication are integrated into the course processes and applied to teaching and learning situations.

E29: FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION

E28: DEAFNESS REHABILITATION

E29.1018 30 hours: 3 points. Summer.

Teaching Foreign Languages to Elementary School Children

Concentrated instruction in American Sign Language.

Modes of learning, methods, instructional strategies, language and literacy development, and resources for teaching foreign languages to elementary school children. Emphasis is on the development of literacy and communicative skills. This experience includes 15 hours of field observation.

American Sign Language: Techniques of Communicating with Deaf Persons, Level II

Supervised Student Teaching in Foreign Language Education: Middle School

American Sign Language: Techniques of Communicating with Deaf Persons, Level I E28.1090 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring.

E28.1091 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. For description, see E28.1090.

American Sign Language: Techniques of Communicating with Deaf Persons, Level III E28.1291 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. A continuation of E28.1090,1091. Emphasis is on developing fluency in both expressive and receptive skills. Videotaping sessions also form an integral part of this course.

American Sign Language: Advanced Techniques of Communicating with Deaf Persons, Level IV E28.1292 60 hours: 4 points. Spring. For description, see E28.1291.

Linguistic Structure of American Sign Language E28.1295 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. An introductory course presuming no prior training in either linguistics or American Sign Language (ASL). Topics covered include iconicity versus arbitrariness; ASL phonology (how signs are formed); morphology (how signs take on various functions); syntax (how sentences are organized); sign language acquisition and psycholinguistic aspects of ASL. Language samples are analyzed.

E27.1050 45 hours plus 30 hours arranged in classroom observation/participation: 4 points.

American Deaf Culture and Community

Examines knowledge of the learning processes across disciplines as a basis for instructional planning with particular attention to teaching diverse populations in urban schools. Various modes of assessment are considered in terms of how they inform instructional decisions. The roles of instructional strategies, motivation, and classroom management are addressed as means of stimulating and sustaining learner interest and coop-

E28.1297 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Explores deafness as a cultural phenomenon through the study of the history, language, art forms, traditions, and patterns of everyday life of America’s deaf community.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E29.1065 A minimum of 20 school days: 4 points. University supervised student teaching experience in foreign language at middle school level for 20 days. Student teaching experiences are used to support theoretical and practical application of the planning and implementation of curriculum. This experience also includes a 30-hour class observation prior to student teaching and a student teaching seminar, which meets once a week.

Supervised Student Teaching in Foreign Language Education: High School E29.1066 A minimum of 20 school days: 4 points. University supervised student teaching experience in foreign language at high school level for 20 days. Student teaching experiences are used to support theoretical and practical application of the planning and implementation of curriculum. This experience also includes a 30hour class observation prior to student teaching and a student teaching seminar, which meets once a week.

Japanese for Business People and Language Teachers E29.1171 30 hours and hours arranged: 3 points. Fall. Introduction to the Japanese language, with a business focus, for professionals whose employment requires daily contact with Japanese-speaking people. This course is also good for teachers who will get a chance to learn methodologies of working with beginning and intermediate learners of Japanese. One hour of practice will be arranged each week in addition to regular class meetings.

124 • E29 to E33 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

plans that meet current recommendations for a variety of health conditions using exchange systems, food composition data, menus, recipes, and product labels. (Note: knowledge and application of nutrition-related pathophysiology is covered in E33.1185, Clinical Nutrition Assessment and Intervention.)

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service III: Advanced Nutrition Applications

A practical course that includes the special vocabulary and idiomatic structures needed by nutritionists, nurses, and other health care professionals who communicate with Spanish-speaking clients in their daily work.

Food Issues of Contemporary Societies

Application and evaluation of current computer tools for nutritional analysis.

Field Experience and Seminar in Foreign Language Teaching

Issues related to methods of food production, distribution, marketing, trade, and politics and the impact of these methods on food intake and the environment in contemporary societies.

Foreign Languages in Professional Settings: Spanish for Health Care Professionals E29.1489 30 hours and hours arranged: 3 points. Fall, spring.

E29.1915 30 hours plus 30 hours of field experiences: 4 points. Fall, spring. Visits to foreign/second language classes, K-12, and to community resources useful in foreign/second language teaching (30 hours). Class discussion focuses on language teaching skills, human development and relations, lesson planning, use of technology in classrooms, classroom management, learning environment, and parental and community involvement.

Teaching Foreign Languages: Theory and Practice E29.1999 30 hours plus 15 hours of field experiences and hours arranged: 4 points. Fall. The first method course for foreign language education majors. Course contents include guiding principles and methodology in a variety of approaches to the teaching of foreign languages, specifically in developing auditory comprehension and oral production; teaching reading and writing; impact of culture, heritage, socioeconomic level, and educational background on language and literacy development as well as human development processes and variations. Also included are skills in motivation, communication, and classroom management.

E33.0071 45 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Introduction to Foods and Food Science E33.0085 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. Fundamental foods course: scientific bases of food use. Professional methods and skills in food preparation. Lecture and laboratory.

Food Management Theory E33.0091 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. Organization and management of commercial and institutional food service facilities in hotel, restaurant, educational, and community program sites.

Nutrition and Health E33.0119 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. Introduction to nutrition science and its role in health and society; nutrient characteristics, requirements, and food sources; energy balance and weight control; dietary guides and food planning; and social and economic factors that affect food production and consumption.

Note: Students matriculated in the College of Arts and Science must complete appropriate language requirements before applying for student teaching.

Independent Study

Other advanced courses in the target languages are offered for juniors and seniors on advisement.

For description, see page 167.

E33: NUTRITION AND FOOD STUDIES Diet Assessment and Planning

E33.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged.

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service I: Introduction E33.1017 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Application and evaluation of basic computer tools and techniques for nutritional analysis and food service management. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.

E33.0060 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. Prerequisite: E33.0119 (not required for nursing students).

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service II: Software Applications

Assessment of the food intake and needs of individuals of diverse ages and backgrounds. Taking into consideration the genetic, cultural, social, and economic factors that affect dietary choices, students develop dietary

Application and evaluation of computer software tools for nutritional analysis and food service management. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.

E33.1018 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: E33.1017 or equivalent.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E33.1019 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E33.1017, E33.1018 or equivalents.

Computers in Nutrition and Food Service IV: Advanced Food Service Applications E33.1020 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E33.1017, E33.1018 or equivalents. Application and evaluation of current computer tools for management of food service systems.

Food Microbiology and Sanitation E33.1023 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Food safety, processing, and regulatory issues related to the role of microorganisms in food processing and preservation. The use of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) to prevent contamination of food, equipment, and personnel.

Beverages E33.1025 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Introduction to basic principles and practical experience in development of beverage systems and menus. Considers pricing, equipment, legal, merchandising, and personnel policies.

Food Service Supervision and Training E33.1039 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Principles of training and supervision in food service management through lectures, demonstrations, and case studies.

Food Microbiology and Sanitation: Safety Certification E33.1048 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Covers food service sanitation procedures: facilities, food handling, codes, and management responsibilities. Prepares students to take the National Restaurant Association’s examination for food safety certification (ServSafe).

Food and Society E33.1051 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. The ways in which culture, social customs, and economic forces have interacted and currently interact to influence the food intake, health, and nutritional status of selected world populations.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E33 Courses • 125

Food Production and Management E33.1052 75 hours; 25 hours lecture, 50 hours laboratory: 3 points. Fall, spring. Institutional and commercial food preparation and service: menu planning and pricing and recipe standardization integrated with techniques, methods, principles, and standards of food purchasing, receiving, storage, and preparation; food procurement and merchandising; and staff supervision. Lecture and laboratory.

Food Management Essentials IV: Financial Accounting E33.1113 10 hours: 1 point. Spring. Survey of basic theoretical principles pertaining to financial accounting for food operations. An accelerated course for students of food studies, nutrition, and related fields with limited previous managerial knowledge or experience.

Current Research in Nutrition Food Facility Design and Equipment E33.1054 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisites: E33.0052, E33.0091. Food facility design, layout, and equipment selection, specification, and organization.

Internship in Food Studies and Food Management E33.1056 45 hours per point plus hours arranged: 1-6 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: junior status. Practical work experience in food studies and food management supported by classwork, discussion, and projects. The objectives of the course are to apply classroom content to work experience; identify career options through professional seminars, work experience, and class discussions; develop professional skills through personal observations, work experience, and class assignments; and identify resources and professional networks that support employment opportunities in the field of interest.

E33.1117 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. For advanced undergraduates.

E33.1064 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. Prerequisites: V25.0240, V25.0868 (undergraduates only); E33.1269 (may be taken concurrently).

E33.1183 15 hours per point: 1-2 points. Spring. Introduction to foods from various nationality groups through lectures, demonstrations, and field trips.

Food Science and Technology E33.1184 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. Prerequisites: E33.0085, V25.0002.

Critical evaluation of recent research through seminars and class discussions.

Scientific and sensory principles of food evaluation: professional methods, quality assurance, and objective experiments in advanced food preparation. Lecture and laboratory.

Communications Workshop in Foods and Nutrition

Clinical Nutrition Assessment and Intervention

E33.1130 30 hours: 2 points. Summer. Prerequisite: E33.0119.

E33.1185 45 hours: 3 points. Prerequisites: E33.0060; E33.1269 (may be taken concurrently).

Techniques for communicating information about foods and nutrition to professionals, the public, the media, and food and beverage marketers.

Essentials of Cuisine: International E33.1135 15 hours per point: 1-3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E33.0085. Introduction to the art and science of cuisine characteristics of selected world cultures through lectures, demonstrations, hands-on preparation, and field trips.

Food Demonstrations Nutritional Biochemistry

International Foods

E33.1137 15 hours per point: 1-3 points. Summer. Prerequisite: E33.0085.

Advanced study of the effects of disease on nutrient and energy requirements and metabolism, assessment and treatment of disease-induced malnutrition, and nutritional support methods applied to case management. Emphasizes assessment of anthropometric and biochemical indicators, clinical symptoms, and development of individual nutritional care plans. For advanced undergraduates and graduate students requiring preparation for clinical courses.

International Nutrition E33.1187 15 hours per point: 1-3 points. Summer. Introduction to world food problems and their nutritional, economic, and social effects.

Study of the role of nutrients in the human body at the cellular level and in metabolism.

Principles and methods for planning, organizing, and demonstrating preparation of selected foods, meals, and cuisines—especially those modified for nutritional or other purposes—to small and large groups. Repeatable up to 3 points.

Food Service Accounting Management

Food Events: Planning and Catering

Introduction to financial planning, control, fundraising, and investment in food and food service industries.

E33.1101 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: C10.0001 or equivalent.

E33.1143 15 hours per point: 1-3 points. Fall, spring.

Food Marketing

Basic accounting procedures for the food service industry for control of revenues, expenses, assets, and liabilities, along with techniques for costing, budgeting, and pricing, with emphasis on their use in situation analysis and decision making.

Organization of marketing, planning, pricing, purchasing, preparation, delivery, and service of foods and meals for specific purposes and occasions, at both onpremise and off-site locations.

Food and Nutrition in a Global Society Food Laws and Regulations E33.1109 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisites: E33.0085, E33.0091. Overview of legal issues affecting food service management: laws, contracts, taxes, and relations with administrative and regulatory agencies, both domestic and international.

E33.1180 60 hours: 4 points. Spring. This course, which fulfills the Integrated Liberal Arts requirement, unites the liberal arts experience with a specialization in food and nutrition. It contains three areas of focus: food and nutrition history; ethical issues in food and nutrition; and emerging technologies as they relate to food and nutrition.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Food Finance E33.1188 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: a basic accounting course.

E33.1189 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Principles, functions, and tools of marketing and sales used by distributors, commercial and noncommercial operators, and vendors; investigation of current marketing issues.

126 • E33 to E34 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Fieldwork

Food Photography

E33.1198 120 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E33.0060, E33.1185, E33.1269, and senior status. Application must be filed during the previous term.

E33.1271 15 hours: 1 point. Summer. Demonstration of techniques for photographing foods for use in print and other media formats.

Participation and experience in the professional field of major interest.

E34: SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY

Food Preparation Techniques: Photography

Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanism I, II

E33.1200 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: E33.0085 or equivalent.

E34.0008,0009 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Credit is not granted to students who have received credit for E21.1401.

Introduction to methods involved in preparing food to be photographed for use in print and other media formats.

Food in the Arts E33.1204 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. The ways in which writers, artists, musicians, and filmmakers have used food as a theme or symbol for reasons of aesthetic, social, cultural, or political commentary. May be repeated for up to 6 points.

Community Nutrition E33.1209 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. Prerequisite: E33.0060 (may be taken concurrently). Rationale for development of community nutrition programs and their design, implementation, and evaluation. Lectures and individual and group projects.

Advanced Foods E33.1217 15 hours per point: 1-3 points. Prerequisite: E33.0085. Principles and practice of identification, comparison, and evaluation of selected foods, ingredients, techniques, and equipment for recipe formulation, menu planning, or preparation, with an emphasis on modifications to meet specific nutritional or other requirements. May be repeated for up to 3 points.

Nutrition and the Life Cycle E33.1269 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E33.0119, V25.0240, E14.1035; E33.1064 (may be taken concurrently). Analysis and application of the physiological, biological, and biochemical basis for differences in nutritional requirements throughout the principal stages of the life cycle—pregnancy, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, older adulthood—and the ways in which social and environmental factors influence nutritional status at each stage.

Speech Pathology: An Introduction to Methods and Materials for Diagnosis and Therapy in the Schools E34.1065 90 hours: 4 points. Spring. Prerequisites: E34.0017, E34.0018, and E21.0061 or permission of the instructor.

Speech Pathology I, II

Description and diagnosis of speech and language disorders of functional and organic origins that adversely affect a student’s academic performance are addressed. Methods and materials for authentic assessment that differentiate among language disorders, language delay, and language differences are presented. Therapy using a variety of integrated service delivery models including collaborative, consultative, traditional, direct, and indirect models of intervention is studied. Materials and strategies that address the needs of bilingual students and culturally diverse student populations acknowledging various learning styles are also studied. Each student observes three to four hours weekly in the schools under the supervision of an individual holding New York State licensure and the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence.

E34.0017,0018 30 hours: 2 points each term. Fall, spring.

Introduction to Articulation Disorders

A comprehensive study of the anatomical, physiological, and neurological bases of speech production and perception. The structures and mechanics of respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, and speech perception are studied.

A presentation of clinically normal voice, speech, and language processes provides a foundation for the overview of major categories of communication disabilities. Includes etiologies and typical symptomatology of major communication disorders.

Fundamentals of Hearing

E34.1101 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisites: E34.0017 and E21.1061 or permission of instructor. An introduction to the study of articulation problems associated with functional and organic disturbances. Basic diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for children and adults.

E34.0229 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Concepts and principles basic to the understanding of the normal hearing process. Anatomy and physiology of the auditory system, acoustics, psychophysical methods, and basic correlates of the auditory stimulus.

Organization of Speech and Hearing Programs in the Schools E34.1025 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Prerequisites: E34.0017, E34.0018, and E21.0061 or permission of the instructor. Analysis of initiating and providing speech, language, and hearing rehabilitation programs within the framework of a school system is addressed. Techniques of organization, administrative tasks, differential diagnosis, programming, and establishment of professional relationships with staff, parents, and community members in culturally diverse environments are studied.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Audiology: Intervention Strategies with Children E34.1205 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: E34.1230 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Principles and techniques of audiologic evaluation and management of hearing-impaired infants and children. Both personal and assistive amplification listening systems are covered. Speech reading and auditory training techniques. Educational and communicative options for children of different ages with different types and degrees of hearing loss. The cochlear implant: implications for rehabilitation and education of profoundly hearing-impaired children are included.

Introduction to Language Disorders in Children E34.1207 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisites: E34.1601 and E75.0081. An introduction to language disorders associated with various categories of disability. Basic assessment and remediation approaches are addressed.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E34 to E41 Courses • 127

Introduction to Audiology E34.1230 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Principles and techniques of pure tone and speech audiometry; interpretation of audiograms; consideration of etiologies and auditory characteristics of major types of hearing impairment.

Acoustic Phonetics E34.1402 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisites: E34.1008 and E21.1061 or permission of instructor. A broad-based study of acoustic phonetics including acoustic theory and measurement; distinctive feature systems; and integration of physiologic and perceptual characteristics with concomitant acoustic features.

Supervised Student Teaching of Speech in the Preschools, Elementary, Middle Schools, and High Schools E34.1546 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 6 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged. Open to speech and hearing majors only. Prerequisites: E34.0008, E34.0009, E34.0017, E34.0018, E34.0229, E34.1025, E34.1101, E34.1207, E34.1601, and E21.0061.

E36: SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION Application of Microcomputers to Mathematics and Science Instruction E36.1002 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring.

ments to identify alterations in human environmental health patterns.

Nursing Science I: Fundamentals in Nursing E41.0240* 150 hours: 6 points. Fall, spring.

E38: MEDIA ECOLOGY

Focuses on the development of the concepts and skills used by the professional nurse by incorporating the Rogerian conceptual model. Using the concepts of nursing science, students apply the nursing process in the on-campus laboratory and with adult clients in clinical settings such as acute care facilities, skilled nursing facilities, primary care centers, and elder centers.

The Impacts of Technology

Independent Study

E38.1034 (formerly E31.1034) 60 hours: 4 points. Spring.

E41.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged.

An inquiry into the nature of the technology and human complex in contemporary society. A quest for appropriate actions for the future through understanding.

For description, see page 167.

Introduction to Evolution of Technology

E41.1241* 150 hours: 6 points. Fall, spring.

A study of microcomputer application techniques for teaching science and mathematics. Analysis and application of existing computer programs and techniques to science and mathematics instruction. Field trips and experiences are available.

E38.1035 (formerly E31.1035) 60 hours: 4 points. Fall.

Nursing Science II: Parent/Child Nursing Rogers’s conceptual model provides the framework for examining the life process of mothers, children, and their families as they move through the life cycle of childbearing, childhood, and parenting. Patterns of the human and environmental field are identified; changes in pattern are described and analyzed. The nursing process is utilized in the delivery of nursing care to maximize the health potential of young families.

Provides the opportunity for intensive experience in diagnosing and providing speech and language therapy for children in a public school setting under the supervision of an individual holding New York State licensure and the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence. Class discussions focus on the specific documents used in a public school, laws affecting and governing school speech and language therapy programs, and the current research literature regarding effective programs for public school children. Students partially fulfill the clinical hour requirements for American Speech-Language and Hearing Association Certification and the New York State Department of Education Teaching Certificate.

A study of the technical and social-cultural problems relating to humanity’s efforts in developing and utilizing technology from earliest times to the present. Today’s technical triumphs and mistakes are the results of the interaction of people from all parts of the world.

Language Development in the Preschool Years

Focus is on the conceptual and research development of nursing knowledge that forms the basis of evidenced-based practice. The relationship of nursing theories to the development of research questions and the explanation of research findings is discussed. Areas of nursing inquiry currently investigated are presented. The validity of quantitative and the confirmability of qualitative methods used to answer nursing research questions are discussed. Students critically evaluate current nursing research and assess applicability to clinical practice. They also evaluate and assess applicability of related research reported in the media.

Nursing Science IV: Community Health/Psychiatric Nursing

Health Assessment

E41.1244* 150 hours: 6 points. Fall, spring.

E41.0239* 30 hours: 2 points. Spring.

Focuses on the life process of adults and elders. The interactions among aging, disease, functional ability, and the environment are explored. Emphasis is placed

E34.1601 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Focuses on research on normal language acquisition and development with reference to three oral language components: form, content, and use. Implications for the facilitation of language in children delayed in language development are discussed.

E41: NURSING Theoretical and Research Bases of Nursing Practice E41.0120* 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer.

Focuses on the development of health assessment techniques that includes use of data collection instru-

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Nursing Science III: Adult Health Nursing E41.1242* 150 hours: 6 points. Fall, spring. Focuses on the Rogerian conceptual model as perspective for viewing individuals experiencing acute and/or chronic illness. The nursing process is applied in caring for hospitalized adults.

E41.1243* 150 hours: 6 points. Fall, spring. E41.1253* 75 hours: 3 points. Fall. R.N.’s only. Focuses on the Rogerian conceptual model as a perspective for viewing health promotion of persons, groups, and communities and of persons experiencing changes in patterning related to mental health. The nursing process is applied to persons, groups, communities, and individuals in mental health settings.

Nursing Science V: Nursing Care of Adults and Elders

128 • E41 to E59 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Ethical Issues in Professional Life

History of Communication

E50.1050 60 hours: 4 points. Spring.

E59.0003 60 hours: 4 points. Spring.

Nursing Science VI: Leadership and Management

Ethical issues in the human service professions. Historical perspective on the evolution of the professional idea. Ethical issues inherent to the idea of being a professional; examples drawn from education, nursing, health, art, and business.

E41.1245* 150 hours: 6 points. Spring, fall. E41.1254* 75 hours: 3 points. Spring. R.N.’s only.

Introduction to Environmental Ethics

A survey of the four great revolutions in human communication: orality (speech), literacy (writing and reading), typography (print and mass literacy), and the electronic media (telegraph, telephone, photograph, film, radio, television, computers, and communication satellites). Examines how the semiotic codes, physical structures, and time-space biases of the media wrought by these revolutions have affected such basic human communication forms as memory, myth and ritual, narration and reenactment, and visual imagery.

on the application of the nursing process to health problems, health promotion, and health maintenance relating to orthopedics, neurology, rehabilitation, immune dysfunction, and elimination in the adult and elderly clients.

Focuses on the understanding, synthesis, and application of leadership and management principles. Students apply current leadership and management research findings in provision of care. Critical thinking and ethical decision-making skills are developed in identifying and analyzing key issues in the delivery of professional nursing care.

E50.1500 45 hours: 4 points. Spring. A consideration of the leading philosophical ideas involved in the many ways that people are looking at environmental issues. Attention focuses on the variety of interpretations given to humanity’s relationship to the earth and on questions of knowing and learning, moral conduct, the rights of nonhuman life, and the nature of economic activity these interpretations provide.

Nursing Care of Unitary Human Beings is the first of three clinical courses required for the registered professional nurse seeking to obtain a bachelor’s degree in nursing. Rogers’s Science of Unitary Human Beings provides the framework for examining patterning of the human/environmental field over the life cycle. The roles of the nurse as teacher and advocate are emphasized. For associate’s degree and diploma nurses.

Altered Health Patterns E41.1435 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite or corequisite: human anatomy, inorganic and organic chemistry. Open to special students. Focuses on pathophysiology. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of usual health patterns of major body subsystems to changes that occur during the illness experience.

E55: HISTORY OF EDUCATION Critical Study of Education

Introduction to Media Criticism

E55.1031 30 hours plus 15 hours arranged in field participation experiences: 3 points.

E59.0014 60 hours: 4 points. Spring.

Part of the common pedagogical core, this course helps teachers acquire the critical skills of reflective practitioners. Through critical analysis of the educational ideas of Plato, Rousseau, and Dewey, students learn how to identify assumptions, analyze arguments, and assess evidence. Includes critical discussions of the role of the teacher and what’s worth knowing and how teachers’ understandings of the complex communities in which they teach can be used to promote student learning.

Historical Quest for Human Nature E55.1032 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring.

E41.1436* 45 hours: 3 points. Spring, fall. Prerequisites: physiology and organic chemistry.

A study of the idea of human nature from the 18th century to the present. Readings of philosophic reflections on psychology from Locke and Rousseau to Skinner and Wilson. Questions of race and gender in the 20th-century discussion.

Client responses to pharmacological agents. Application of nursing process to clients taking pharmacologic agents.

E59: COMMUNICATION STUDIES

Nursing Pharmacotherapeutics

E50: PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION Introduction to Philosophy of Education E50.1003 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Assumptions and implications of educational theory and practice; teaching and learning, the structure of knowledge, and impact of the behavioral sciences; indoctrination and social and political influences on education. Readings from historical and contemporary sources. Emphasis on both ethics and epistemology.

E59.0010 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. An introduction to the role played by language in human society and culture. Examines how language structures our ways of perceiving, knowing, thinking, communicating, and behaving. Uses readings and case studies to examine verbal and nonverbal communication.

Nursing Care of Unitary Human Beings E41.1267* 84 hours: 5 points. Spring.

Language, Thought, and Culture

An introduction to approaches and practices used to criticize the content, structure, and context (including effects) of significant media in our society. Background readings, examination of current criticism, and beginning practice in media criticism are employed.

Independent Study E59.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged. For description, see page 167.

Languages of Communication: Film, Television, Radio E59.1004 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. An exploration of film, television, and radio—with some attention to the print media (newspapers and magazines) and emerging media systems (homerecording systems, cable, computers)—as processors of information, conveyors and creators of mass culture, and forms of aesthetic expression.

Perspectives on Communication

Introduction to Mass Persuasion and Propaganda

E59.0001 60 hours: 4 points. Fall.

E59.1014 60 hours: 4 points. Spring.

Introduces students to the study of contemporary forms of mediated forms of communication. The course surveys the main topics in the field and introduces students to a variety of analytical perspectives. Issues include the economics of media production; the impact of media on individual attitudes, values, and behaviors; the role of media professionals; and the impact of new media technologies.

Analysis of the development, principles, techniques, and results of mass persuasion from its beginnings in ancient civilizations to its evolution into propaganda in the modern technological society. Mass persuasion in war, politics, and advertising is examined.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E59 to E63 Courses • 129

Mass Media and Society E59.1016 60 hours: 4 points. Fall. An examination of the great debate concerning the effects of mass media and mass communication on our society. Analysis and application of major perspectives and approaches used in formulating modern theories of mass communication.

Integrating Liberal Arts: Communication E59.1200 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Open only to seniors in the Department of Culture and Communication or by permission of the instructor. A culminating course integrating models of interpretation derived from the liberal arts with the analytical tools developed in communication studies. Reflects current research interests within the department and encourages students to explore emerging issues in the field of communication studies, including media and globalization, professional ethics, and the interaction between audiences and texts.

Mass Media, Global Communication, and the Future E59.1300 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Examines the broad range of activities associated with the globalization of media production, distribution, and reception. Issues include the relationship between local and national identities and the emergence of a “global culture” and the impact of technological innovations on the media themselves and their use and reception in a variety of settings.

E63: APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY Human Development I E63.0020 60 hours plus 15 hours of field experience: 4 points. Fall. Introduction to research and theory of human development across the life span. Seminal theories and basic research of individual growth and development are analyzed and critiqued. Emphasis is on the range in human development with discussion of normative and nonnormative development. Emphasis is also placed on the importance of understanding the influence of normative and nonnormative contexts of development, including the impact of culture, heritage, socioeconomic level, personal health, and safety. Relations between home, school, and community and their impact on development are also explored via readings, lectures, discussions, and weekly observations in the field. Interrogation of implicit folk theories as a foundation for exploration of formal knowledge of human development.

Human Development II: Application for Early Childhood Educators

Human Development II: Application for Educators for Adolescents

E63.0021 30 hours plus 15 hours of field experience: 2 points. Course meets first half of spring semester. Prerequisite: E63.0020.

E63.0024 30 hours plus 15 hours of field experience: 2 points. Course meets second half of spring semester. Prerequisite: E63.0020.

Further analysis of research findings and theories of human development focusing on early childhood and applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include language development, assessment of readiness to learn, separation from the family, peer relationships, aesthetic experiences. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive and dangerous environments and of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use are also included. Direct application of theory and research is made through field-based inquiry and issue-based investigation.

Further analysis of research findings and theories of human development focusing on adolescence and applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include understanding and mastering test-based graduation requirements, transition to work/college, identity development, depression, and aggression. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive and dangerous environments and of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use are also included. Direct application of theory and research is made through field-based inquiry and issue-based investigation.

Human Development II: Application for Childhood Educators

Social Psychology

E63.0022 30 hours plus 15 hours of field experience: 2 points. Course meets second half of spring semester. Prerequisite: E63.0020. Further analysis of research findings and theories of human development focusing on childhood and applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include numeric competence, assessment of reading problems, gender differences in learning styles. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive and dangerous environments and of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use are also included. Direct application of theory and research is made through field-based inquiry and issue-based investigation.

Human Development II: Application for Educators of Early Adolescents E63.0023 30 hours plus 15 hours of field experience: 2 points. Course meets first half of spring semester. Prerequisite: E63.0020. Further analysis of research findings and theories of human development focusing on early adolescence and applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include puberty, cross-gender peer relations, preventing risky behaviors such as drug and alcohol use, delinquency, and assessment of male and female achievement. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive and dangerous environments and of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use are also included. Direct application of theory and research is made through field-based inquiry and issue-based investigation.

E63.1003 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: a course in general or educational psychology. Social psychology concepts, theories, and research and their relation to educational problems. Concepts treated are attitudes, values, roles, norms, communication, conformity; areas emphasized are group processes and influence, social motivation, prejudice, authoritarianism.

Teaching Reading to Exceptional Children E63.1007* 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisites: E75.0081, E75.0082, E75.0083, E25.1060, and E25.1175. Focuses on the teaching of reading to exceptional children. Practicum experiences include administering standardized and informal assessment instruments; lesson planning; remediating specific skill deficiencies; and evaluating learner progress.

The Counseling Interview E63.1012 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Not open to graduate-level majors. This course is required for Applied Psychological Studies B.S. undergraduates. The interview is studied as an interactional process in which the interviewer is a helper to the interviewee in various settings. Intended for nonspecialists in counseling and guidance. Hours arranged for laboratory work.

Educational Psychology E63.1014 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: a course in general psychology or equivalent. Not open to freshmen and sophomores. Overview of major areas in psychology such as developmental, learning, social, personality, and measure-

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130 • E63 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

ment; the concepts and principles fundamental to the educative process and their application to teaching.

The Cultures of Psychology

Psychology of Parenthood

How culture has shaped the development of major theoretical perspectives in psychology. Alternative psychological perspectives are addressed with regard to race/ethnicity, gender, and class. Specific topics of interest include biological determinism and the medical model, psychosocial theory, and other prominent psychological constructs such as intelligence and pathology.

E63.1019 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: a course in introductory, educational, or developmental psychology. Parenthood as a psychological stage in human development. Preparation for the tasks, goals, and problems of parenthood. Relevant literature from child development, social learning theory, dynamic psychology, and parent-child relations is included with consideration given to evidence from the fields of comparative psychology and cultural anthropology. Hours arranged for field assignments and individual projects.

E63.1050 45 hours: 3 points. Spring.

Research and Evaluation in the Behavioral Sciences

Fieldwork in Applied Behavioral Science IV E63.1126 120 hours: 4 points. Spring. During this last undergraduate semester, an extensive senior thesis enables students to relate theory and practice in order to implement life-planning decisions. The nature of each student’s thesis takes into account individual interests, skills, and career choices. Presentations in the seminar enable students to develop critical analysis and supervisory skills.

Psychological Measurement

E63.1073 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Program/departmental majors only.

E63.1137 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E63.1073. Program/departmental majors only.

Research and evaluation in applied psychology studies are considered from both theoretical and methodological perspectives. Students participate in the formulation of research problems and in data collection and analysis under the direction of faculty and advanced graduate students.

Introduction to decision theory applied to problems in psychology, sociology, human relations, and selected aspects of economics, political science, and the human services professions. Role of evidence in decisions and rules for collection of relevant evidence. Rationales for quantification of evidence.

Fieldwork in Applied Psychology I

Laboratory in Interviewing Skills

E63.1123 90 hours: 3 points. Fall.

E63.1158 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring.

Theories, conceptions, and descriptions of disordered behavior with an emphasis on psychodynamic systems. The interrelationship of diagnosis and treatment, theories of symptoms formation, criteria of normality.

The focus during this first semester is on assessment of abilities, interests, values, and personality characteristics of each student and observing professionals in representative human service agencies. Students spend a minimum of six hours each week for 15 weeks visiting various human service agencies, observing activities, and conducting informational interviews.

Small-group video laboratory experience utilizing simulation, modeling, and microinterviewing on an experiential learning base. Learning the basic interviewing skills necessary in a wide range of helping relationships.

Personality Development

Fieldwork in Applied Psychology II

E63.1039 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: general, educational, or developmental psychology.

E63.1124 120 hours: 4 points. Spring.

Consideration of major learning theories and related research. Learning is viewed in relation to social, cognitive, and personality development. Implications for the implied behavioral sciences are discussed.

Mental Health: Historical, Social, and Political Perspectives E63.1031 60 hours: 4 points. Spring. A historical analysis of mental health viewed within a changing social and political context. Special attention given to the changing notions of mental health. Applications to different populations and symptoms and, as a corollary, changing notions of intervention.

Abnormal Psychology E63.1038 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring.

Consideration of the major theories of personality. The work of various theorists is discussed as it relates to personality development through the life span.

Students in the Community: Service, Leadership, and Training E63.1040 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. For students interested in enhancing their community service experience. Topics include issues related to community service and volunteer skill development. Lecture panels, guest speakers, and group activities are included.

Women and Mental Health: A Life Cycle Perspective E63.1041 45 hours: 3 points. A focus on the psychology of women and their mental health through the life cycle. Topics include socialization and gender, feminist theory, and therapy as well as high prevalence disorders of girls and women (anxiety and phobias, eating disorders, dealing with violence and abuse, coping with stress, etc.).

During this semester, students apply their self-knowledge and agency preferences to selection of at least two sites for guided observations and in-depth exposure to the work of the agencies. Six hours of fieldwork per week plus seminar participation is required. Career alternatives are explored as part of the decision-making process. Report-writing skills and professional ethics are among the seminar topics. Observational skills are refined continuously.

Fieldwork in Applied Behavioral Science III E63.1125 120 hours: 4 points. Fall. Students select one field site to test a career alternative of their choice. Continuous self-evaluation vis-à-vis field experience and seminar discussions enables students to narrow choices and generalize to other life decisions. Six hours per week at the field site and seminar participation are required for the seminar.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Psychology of Human Learning E63.1214 45 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Survey of Developmental Psychology: Introduction E63.1271 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: a course in psychology or educational psychology. Consideration of the nature of psychological development from conception throughout the life span. Theories of development are related to research findings, and implications are drawn for application to practical issues.

Adolescent Development E63.1272 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: a course in introductory, developmental, or educational psychology. Adolescence as a life stage. Physical, intellectual, social, and psychosexual development. Attention to youth from diverse racial/ethnic and sociocultural backgrounds. Applications and implications for schooling and for prevention and intervention programs directed at psychosocial problems in adoles-

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E63 to E75 Courses • 131

cence are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on neighborhoods, schools, and families as contexts of, and important influences on, development.

Introduction to Group Dynamics E63.1620 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Students gain understanding of group dynamics through reading, lecture, discussion, and participation in small experiential groups. This course is designed to increase students’ understanding of the processes that occur in the development of groups and to enhance their awareness of their interactions with others in groups. The experiential groups are unstructured based on a combination of established models of group dynamics such as T-group and Tavistock.

E66: WOMEN’S STUDIES COMMISSION SERIES Diversity and Professional Life E66.1011 60 hours: 4 points. Spring. An interdisciplinary approach to gender issues in education, psychology, health, and arts professions. Impact of gender on professional values, wage structures, and work-family conflicts. Cultural and other differences among professionals and clients.

E75: SPECIAL EDUCATION Orientation Seminar and Fieldwork: Psychoeducational Aspects of Special Education E75.0081* 135 hours: 3 points. Fall. Required course for all undergraduates majoring in special education. Orientation to special education and to the University. Includes relevant readings and discussions, films, speakers, group advisement, site visits, and small group and individual assignments.

Foundations of Special Education E75.0083 3 points. History, philosophy, and role of education as the foundation of education for all students. Legislation and litigation affecting the provision of services and life opportunities for individuals with diverse characteristics and needs. Characteristics of individuals with disabilities and the effect of those disabilities on learning and behavior. Includes study of education and special education service delivery systems, employment, and community-based resources and supports.

Independent Study

Educating Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom

Integration Seminar in Early Childhood and Special Education

E75.1005 15 hours per point: 3-4 points. Spring. Open to nonmajors.

E75.1012 15 hours: 1 point.

Increasingly, students with a variety of disabilities are remaining in the general education classroom. This course is designed for nonspecial education majors and those from related service areas who recognize the need to understand the issues and possibilities for working successfully with these students. Sample topics include current legislation, availability of resources and related services, parenting issues, and instructional strategies.

Principles and Strategies for Teaching Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities I

Taken concurrently with the final semester of student teaching, this course focuses on the development, planning, and implementation of curriculum for diverse learners in early childhood and early childhood special education settings. Emphasizes curriculum integration, the role of the environment in supporting curriculum, methods of observation and assessment, and pedagogical practices. Encourages informed experimentation with various pedagogical and methodical practices in order to develop in students the capacity to create curriculum responsive to the diverse learning needs and experiences of young children and their families.

Classroom Assessment

E75.1007 2 points.

E75.1035 2 points.

Strategies for adapting curriculum and teaching methodologies for students with disabilities, including assistive and instructive technology and collaborating with teachers, other professionals, paraprofessionals, and parents in creating individualized educational programs.

Formal and informal methods of assessing student learning, including major standardized tests, criterion referenced instruments, curriculum-based assessments, various observational techniques, and portfolio assessments. Students learn to use information gathered through assessment to plan or modify instruction.

Principles and Strategies for Teaching Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities II

Instructional Strategies for Supporting Diverse Learners in Early Childhood Settings I, II

E75.1008 3 points.

E75.1047,1048 2 points each semester.

Continued study of strategies for adapting curriculum and teaching methodologies, including a particular focus on assessment and adaptation of literacy instruction for students experiencing significant difficulty in the acquisition of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Strategies for strengthening family partnerships and for team collaboration are also emphasized.

Strategies of observation and assessment, identifying strengths, individualizing instructional plans, and adapting classroom environments, curriculum, and instructional methodologies to support the highest levels of achievement and development for young children with diverse needs. Topics also include strategies for promoting positive classroom behavior and social interaction skills, facilitation of language development across all cognitive and social domains, the use of assistive and instructional technology, and strategies for using assessment and observational data to plan or modify instruction.

Supervised Student Teaching in Special Education, 1-6 E75.1009 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 3 points. Supervised student teaching in classroom settings serving students with disabilities.

Principles and Practices for Teaching Students with Severe and Multiple Disabilities E75.1010 45 hours: 3 points. Techniques and strategies for curriculum selection, modifications, adaptation, and implementation, including assistive and augmentative technology, in home, school, work, and community settings.

E75.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged. For description, see page 167.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Behavior Modification in Special Education Settings E75.1160 (formerly E63.1160) 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Examination and application of basic principles of applied behavior analysis. Topics include operant and classical conditioning, reinforcers and reinforcement systems, modeling, shaping, satiation, and deprivation. Application is related to behavior management in various classroom settings.

132 • E75 to E85 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Strategies for Teaching Children with Challenging Behavior E75.1161 3 points.

Independent Study E81.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged.

Strategies for creating classroom environments and behavior support plans to promote development of positive classroom behaviors and positive social interaction skills.

For description, see page 167.

Observation and Participation in Early Childhood Special Education

Physical, mental, emotional, and social health problems of elementary and secondary school pupils; remedial procedures; handling of confidential records; counseling techniques; health aspects of educational and vocational guidance.

E75.1503 2 points. A period of observation of children in nursery schools, childcare centers, Head Start and Early Head Start, hospitals, recreation programs, and public and private schools serving children with disabilities, birth through second grade, followed by participation in instruction.

Observation and Participation in Special Education E75.1504 120 hours: 2 points. A period of observation of children in classrooms serving children with disabilities, followed by participation in classroom instruction.

ing the regulations, classroom management and intervention techniques, the study of warning signs, and effective referral processes.

E84: HEALTH STUDIES

Health Counseling E81.1062 30 hours: 2 points. Fall.

Human Reproduction and Sexual Functioning E81.1297 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Primarily a content course for educational personnel and others who will use the subject matter in their professional work. Topics include anatomy, physiology, and common pathologies of the male and female reproductive systems, male and female sexual response cycles, pregnancy, prenatal anatomic differentiation and development, the physiology of childbirth, and methods of fertility regulation.

Supervised Student Teaching in Early Childhood Special Education, Birth Through Grade 2

Introduction to Community Health Research

E75.1509 A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 3-7 points. Number of points set by program requirements.

E81.1321 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: any course in elementary statistics or the equivalent.

Supervised student teaching with children birth through second grade in nursery schools, childcare centers, Head Start and Early Head Start, and public and private schools serving children with disabilities.

Fundamentals of community health research. Basic skills for interpreting community health data, methods of scientific inquiry in the community health field, and review of current community health research literature.

The Role of the Professional in Early Childhood/Special Education

School Violence Prevention Workshop

Sexual Orientation and Its Controversies E84.1010 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Examines the meaning and explanations of sexual orientation, the norm of heterosexuality, and developing a gay, lesbian, or bisexual identity. Explores stigma management, multiple oppressions, coming out, and creating community to combat isolation and oppression. Focuses on controversies that surround gay, lesbian, and bisexual orientations, their implications for gay rights and opportunities for education.

E85: MUSIC AND PERFORMING ARTS PROFESSIONS Aural Comprehension in Music I E85.0006 45 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Corequisite: E85.0035. Training in elementary musicianship skills emphasizing sight-singing and dictation. Course activities are correlated with the materials of harmony and counterpoint for the diatonic repertory.

Aural Comprehension in Music II E85.0007 45 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: E85.0006; corequisite: E85.0036. Continued training in elementary musicianship skills.

Aural Comprehension in Music III E75.1510 2 points. Designed to facilitate the student’s move into the professional realm of the field of early childhood and special education. Topics include working collaboratively with families, paraprofessionals, and other professionals; advocacy for and with children and families, multicultural curriculum, and social justice issues; and the role of observation and research in the classroom.

E81: HEALTH EDUCATION Sexuality and the Human Experience E81.0001 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Explores human sexuality throughout the life cycle as well as sexual attitudes and behavior. Major topics include patterns of sexual responses; love and intimacy; sexual development; behavioral variations; sexually transmitted diseases; and commercialization of sex.

E81.1990 2 hours: 0 points. Completion of this requirement is demonstrated by enrollment and attendance in the workshop. The course meets the requirements set by the relevant education law including the regulations, classroom management and intervention techniques, the study of warning signs, and effective referral processes.

The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education, Child Abuse Identification E81.1999 15 hours: 1 point. Teaches prospective teachers to understand and carry out their responsibilities for the physical and mental health and safety of the children in their care. In particular, the course focuses on means of identifying and reporting suspected child abuse; the prevention of child abduction; preventing alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse; safety and health education; and fire prevention. Each segment of the course meets the requirements set by the relevant education law includ-

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E85.0008 45 hours: 1 point. Fall. Prerequisite: E85.0007; corequisite: E85.0037. Training in intermediate musicianship skills emphasizing sight-singing and dictation. Course activities are correlated with the materials of harmony and counterpoint for the diatonic, chromatic, and posttonal repertories.

Aural Comprehension in Music IV E85.0009 45 hours: 1 point. Spring. Prerequisite: E85.0008; corequisite: E85.0038. Continued training in intermediate musicianship skills.

String Practicum for Composers E85.0016 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. There is a fee for renting instruments. A review of fingerings and positions for violin, viola, cello, and double bass playing and composition. Examination and performance of scores written for strings. Composition projects for strings.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E85 Courses • 133

Woodwind/Brass Practicum for Composers E85.0017 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. There is a fee for renting instruments. A review of traditional and experimental fingerings and effects on wind instruments. Examination and performance of scores written for winds. Composition projects for winds.

Woodwind/Brass Practicum for Music Education

Music Theory I

Fundamentals of Conducting

E85.0035 45 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Corequisite: E85.0006.

E85.0065 15 hours: 1 point. Fall.

An introduction to melody, harmony, and counterpoint in the music of diatonic tonality through projects in directed composition and analysis.

Music Theory II E85.0036 45 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: E85.0035; corequisite: E85.0007.

E85.0025 15 hours: 1 point. Fall. There is a fee for renting instruments.

Further projects in diatonic tonality and an introduction to simple forms.

Fundamentals of woodwind, brass, and percussion playing in a heterogeneous situation for the prospective teacher. Class-teaching procedures and equipment, methods, and materials for children and adolescents.

Music Theory III

String Practicum for Music Education E85.0026 15 hours: 1 point. Spring. There is a fee for renting instruments. Prerequisite: E85.0025 or equivalent. Fundamentals of string playing in a heterogeneous situation for the prospective teacher. Class-teaching procedures and equipment, methods and materials for children and adolescents. Additional mixed ensembles of string, brass, wind, and percussion with particular attention devoted to writing for these combinations in schools.

E85.0037 45 hours: 2 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E85.0036; corequisite: E85.0008. Hands-on work with the materials of chromatic tonality and an introduction to complex forms.

Music Theory IV E85.0038 45 hours: 2 points. Spring. Prerequisite: E85.0037; corequisite: E85.0009. Introduction to the materials and organizing principles of 20th-century music including extended chromaticism, modes, atonality, and jazz.

Stringed Instruments (Private Lessons)

Percussion Practicum

E85.0045* 7.5-15 hours: 2-4 points. Fall, spring. For freshmen and sophomores.

E85.0027 15 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring.

For description, see E85.1045.

Fundamentals of both mallet and percussion instruments for the prospective teacher. Students participate in a percussion ensemble and learn to write for and to conduct a percussion ensemble.

Training in conducting basic time signatures through assignments and class activities. Examination of instrumental and vocal ensemble concepts and techniques for the elementary and secondary levels.

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation I, II E85.0072,0073* 15 hours: 1 point each term. Fall, spring. For department majors only. Section determined by examination. Development of keyboard skills through improvisation and approaches to accompanying movement, singing, and instrumental playing. Techniques of sight-reading, transposition, and score reading are emphasized.

Keyboard Harmony and Improvisation III, IV E85.0074,0075* 15 hours: 1 point each term. Fall, spring. For department majors only. Section determined by examination. For description, see E85.0072,0073.

Participation in Chamber Ensembles E85.0080‡ 60 hours: no points, no tuition fee. Fall, spring. Open to the University community. Required each term of music performance and music education majors not registered for other ensembles. Study and performance of chamber music literature.

Piano or Organ (Private Lessons) E85.0056* 7.5-15 hours: 2-4 points. Fall, spring. For freshmen and sophomores.

Participation in New York University Band

E85.0028 30 hours: 1 point. Spring.

Italian/English Diction

Review literature on techniques for conducting elementary and secondary choral groups and implement through class conducting activities coupled with a review of literature on vocal techniques for young singers, score reading, and score preparation.

E85.0061 30 hours: 2 points. Fall.

E85.0083‡ 90 hours: no points, no tuition fee. Fall, spring. Open to the University community. Registration by audition only. Required each term of freshman and sophomore instrumental students.

Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet and lyric diction rules for singing in Italian and English.

Experience in playing the standard literature and performance of new works on and off campus.

French/German Diction

Wind or Percussion Instruments (Private Lessons)

E85.0062 30 hours: 2 points. Spring.

Participation in New York University Choral Arts Society

Vocal and Choral Conducting Practicum

E85.0034* 7.5-15 hours: 2-4 points. Fall, spring. For freshmen and sophomores. For description, see E85.1034.

For description, see E85.1056.

Study of lyric diction rules for singing in French and German; continued study of the International Phonetic Alphabet as it applies to these languages.

Voice (Private Lessons) E85.0063* 7.5-15 hours: 2-4 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged. For freshmen and sophomores. For description, see E85.1063.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E85.0085‡ 100 hours: no points, no tuition fee. Fall, spring. Open to the University community.Registration by audition only. Required each term of all freshman and sophomore vocal majors. Performance of the major choral literature. The society presents concerts at many University and public functions. Smaller ensembles are derived from the total membership.

134 • E85 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Participation in New York University Orchestra

The Business Structure of the Music Industry

E85.0087‡ 60 hours: no points, no tuition fee. Fall, spring. Open to the University community. Registration by audition only.

E85.0221 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. Required of all students in the music business program. Open to nonmajors.

Performance of orchestral literature and orchestral/ vocal works in concert with the New York University Choral Arts Society.

Participation in New York University Jazz Ensemble E85.0089‡ 60 hours: no points, no tuition fee. Fall, spring. Open to the University community. Registration by audition only. Study and performance of standard dance band literature, experimental jazz compositions, and student arrangements.

Collegium and Program Seminar E85.0092‡ 30 hours: no points. Fall, spring. Required each term of all undergraduates. All undergraduate music majors meet in collegium six times each semester to discuss broad issues of the music profession, career opportunities, and departmental matters. During the remaining weeks, students meet with members of their major program for visits with specialists in their field and for programmatic discussions.

Music Theatre Professions E85.0099 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Definition of music theatre as an art form. Review of its current status in Broadway, regional, stock, community, and educational venues. Presentation of key elements of music theatre productions including acting, direction, choreography, and set/lighting/costume design. Study of selected repertoire providing models for song analysis. Broadway directors, actors, and choreographers are invited for lectures, demonstrations, and discussions throughout the semester.

A background study of all related areas of the multibillion-dollar music industry, including record company operations, music publishing, artist management, promotion, copyright, and corporate structure.

Independent Study E85.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged.

E85.1001 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, summer. Prerequisites: E85.1817, E85.1818. Introduction to the physical aspects of sound, sound level measurement, microphone techniques, psychoacoustics, basic electricity, principles and practice of magnetic recording, and an overview of the recording studio.

Recording Technology I Laboratory E85.1002 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, summer. Corequisite: E85.1001. Practical application of the knowledge acquired in E85.1001, including an introduction to multitrack recording techniques and ear training for engineering. In addition to lectures given during lab time, students form lab groups and are assigned studio time each week to perform assignments.

Recording Technology II E85.1003 60 hours: 4 points. Spring, summer. Prerequisites: E85.1001, E85.1002. Digital recording technology is discussed. Topics include recording console theory and operation, microphone design and techniques, signal processing and digital effects equipment, hard-disc recording and reproduction.

E85.0103 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring.

E85.1004 30 hours: 2 points. Spring, summer. Corequisite: E85.1003.

E85.0220 45 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring.

Principles covered in Recording Technology I and II are put into practice with additional theory and hands-on training. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session.

Recording Practicum IV E85.1006 60 hours: 4 points. Spring, summer. Prerequisites: E85.1003, E85.1004, and E85.1005. A continuation of E85.1005.

MIDI Technology I Recording Technology I

Recording Technology II Laboratory

Acting for Music Theatre I

E85.1005 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, summer. Prerequisites: E85.1003, E85.1004.

For description, see page 167.

Sight Reading for Vocalists Vocal music sight-reading training beginning with the study of intervals and rhythms, which are then applied to popular and jazz songs. Solo- and part-singing activities.

Recording Practicum III

A practicum in the recording studio that coincides with the lecture schedule and demonstrates all the topics outlined in E85.1003. This course also provides ear training for engineering. In addition to lectures given during lab time, students form lab groups and are assigned studio time each week in which to perform assignments. A final multitrack project is required.

Fundamentals of basic acting technique and stage convention. Improvisation, monologues, scene study integrating the disciplines of acting, voice, and movement.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E85.1007 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. An introduction to MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) with an emphasis on current applications. MIDI sequencing, recording, production, and arranging techniques are also incorporated into the course.

Fundamentals of Audio Technology I: Studio Maintenance E85.1008 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, summer. An introduction to maintenance and trouble-shooting concepts used in the recording studio. Procedures discussed are those necessary in utilizing sophisticated audio equipment and understanding essential aspects of studio design.

Fundamentals of Audio Technology II: Studio Maintenance E85.1009 45 hours: 3 points. Spring, summer. Advanced work in studio repair and maintenance focusing on digital equipment. Students develop practical skills tracing schematics, using test equipment, and replacing components as required daily in the studio environment.

Audio for Video I E85.1010 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, summer. An introduction to the concepts and applications of audio production for video, television, and film. Current production techniques frequently used in the postproduction industry are explored, with special emphasis on synchronization and the interfacing of SMPTE time code, and multitrack audio-sweetening techniques including music editing, sound effects design, foley, and dialog replacement.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E85 Courses • 135

Concert Recording I

Composition (Private Lessons)

E85.1011 30 hours: 2 points in fall, 3 points in summer.

E85.1021* 7.5-15 hours: 2-4 points. May be repeated until a total of 12-14 points has been earned. Fall, spring. Open to students in theory and composition.

Introduction to the concepts of live concert recording. Microphone selection, characteristics, and placement as well as acoustic problems encountered in concert halls are discussed. Students have the opportunity to apply the lecture material by recording undergraduate rehearsals and recitals.

Concert Recording II E85.1012 30 hours: 2 points in spring, 3 points in summer. Advanced techniques in concert recording. Topics include refinement of microphone placement and the use of artificial reverberation techniques to enhance the natural acoustics of concert halls. Students have the opportunity to apply lecture material by recording graduate and faculty concerts.

Composition in all forms and styles including electronic. Electronic laboratory by assignment.

Recording Technology for Nonmajors E85.1022 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Open to students without previous experience in recording technology. Introduction to the physical aspects of sound, psychoacoustics, basic electricity, principles and practice of magnetic recording, and an overview of the recording studio, including an introduction to multitrack recording techniques. Students perform various duties just as they would in a professional recording session with live musicians in the recording studio. Open to students without previous experience in recording technology.

Voice Class: Literature and Technique E85.1013 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Composition for the Music Theatre

Study of vocal physiology and the basic principles and techniques of vocal production and pedagogy. Students learn practical application of vocal principles by giving private vocal instruction to nonvoice majors.

Composing in the various styles and forms to be found in music theatre. Creating lyrics appropriate to each. “Adapting” a play into a musical libretto in synopsis form.

MIDI Technology II

Voice (Group)

E85.1014 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. Prerequisite: E85.1007.

E85.1024 15 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged. Section determined by adviser in music department.

Programming for MIDI devices using MAX, C, and other appropriate techniques. Design and implementation of software sequencers, interface drivers, and hardware applications are the focus.

Form and Analysis E85.1015 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Techniques and concepts applied to music literature since 1700. Synthesis through analysis, performance, and composition involving contrapuntal and harmonic textures.

E85.1023 30 hours: 2-3 points. Fall, spring.

Group lessons in voice for nonmusic majors and those not performing in University groups (six in a group, one hour per week).

Teaching of Music in the Junior and Senior High School E85.1027* 45 hours: 2 points. Spring. Music in the general curriculum. Developing an understanding and perception of the process of musical thought applicable to youth. Students observe in selected schools.

Electronic Music Performance E85.1019 45 hours: 2 points. Spring, summer. Through discussions with guest performers, students study the conceptualization and production of live electronics performance pieces. Individual proposals for several pieces are created, followed by a final live performance project, in which live electronics are an integral part of the concept.

Wind or Percussion Instruments (Private Lessons) E85.1034* 7.5-15 hours: 2-4 points (3 points for students in music performing curricula). May be repeated. Fall, spring. Private or group lessons (by examination) in wind or percussion instruments, supplemented by extra assignments, outside practice, and observation. Required attendance at recitals.

Musical Acoustics E85.1035 30 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. An introduction to the field of acoustics emphasizing sound production by musical instruments, propagation of sound from source to listener (including electronic reproduction), and psychoacoustics perception of sound.

Electronic Music Synthesis: Fundamental Techniques E85.1037 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. An introductory course in electronic music synthesizer techniques. Basic concepts in the synthesis on music including generation of sound, voltage control, and treatment of sound are covered. Students complete laboratory tasks on analog synthesizer modules and create a project that demonstrates the application of basic concepts.

Clinical Improvisation in Music Therapy E85.1038 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Restricted to music therapy students. Focuses on the improvisational use of the piano and its application to various clinical populations.

Jazz Theory and Ear Training E85.1039 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisites: E85.0009, E85.0036, and E85.0038. Examination of the melodic, harmonic, and notational resources used in jazz composition, jazz arranging, and jazz performance. Sight-singing and ear-training activity is correlated with theoretical study.

Wind or Percussion Instruments (Group) E85.1032 15 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged. Section determined by adviser in music department. Group lessons in wind or percussion instruments for nonmusic majors and those not performing in University groups (six in a group, one hour per week).

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Stringed Instruments (Group) E85.1041 15 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged. Section determined by adviser in music department. Group lessons in guitar for nonmusic majors and those not performing in University groups (six in a group, one hour per week).

136 • E85 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Internship in Music Business

Studio Composition Projects

Voice (Private Lessons)

E85.1042* 50 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer. Junior or senior standing only.

E85.1053 30-60 hours: 2-4 points. Fall, spring. Departmental approval required.

E85.1063* 7.5-15 hours: 2-4 points (3 points for students in music performing curricula). May be repeated. Fall, spring.

Assignment to record companies, music venues, management agencies, or other music industry-related firms for on-the-job training. Written report, workshop, and orientation required.

Colloquium in Music Therapy E85.1043,1044* 90 hours per point: 2-6 points each term. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged. Orientation to problems in clinical music therapy situations. Offered in conjunction with fieldwork in various agencies and institutions associated with New York University.

Stringed Instruments (Private Lessons) E85.1045* 7.5-15 hours: 2-4 points (3 points for students in music performing curricula). May be repeated. Fall, spring. Private or group lessons (by examination) in stringed instruments, supplemented by extra assignments, outside practice, and observation. Required attendance at recitals.

Introduction to Music Therapy E85.1046 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Survey of the scope and variety of practices in the music therapy profession. Current research and methodologies. Contrasting modalities of treatment. Relationship to arts therapies, music education, and special education. Of special interest to educators, performers, and arts professionals.

Computer Music Synthesis: Fundamental Techniques E85.1047 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring, summer. An exploration of the potentials of computer music synthesis. Concepts of music synthesis are presented through the use of a computer, keyboard, and appropriate software, including an introduction to digital audio. Students create weekly assignments that demonstrate the application of basic concepts.

Teaching of Music in the Elementary Grades E85.1048 45 hours: 2 points. Fall. For music education majors only.

Assigned composition projects in designated analog and digital synthesis studios.

Materials and Technology in Music and Music Education E85.1054 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. Study and performance of new published and unpublished materials suited to all levels of music instruction. Particular emphasis on computer-assisted technology, assessment, practices, and group methods.

Integrated Arts in Childhood Education E85.1055 30 hours: 2 points. Methods for integrating music, art, dance, and drama into an integrated childhood education curriculum.

Piano or Organ (Private Lessons) E85.1056* 7.5-15 hours: 2-4 points (3 points for students in music performing curricula). May be repeated. Fall, spring. Private or group lessons (by examination) in piano, supplemented by extra assignments, outside practice, and observation. Required attendance at recitals.

Electronic Piano (Group) E85.1059 15 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged. Section determined by adviser in music department. Group lessons in piano for nonmusic majors and those not performing in University groups (six to eight in a group, one hour per week). Traditional and jazz sections.

Opera Workshop E85.1060 A minimum of 15-45 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Enrollment by permission of instructor. Study of fundamental techniques for performance in opera. Performance of selected arias, scenes, and oneact operas.

Voice Improvisation for Music Therapists E85.1062 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. The use of the voice and imagination in exploring a wide range of vocal expression through improvisation.

Integrated music and movement experiences in the development of elementary curricula for cognitiveaffective growth. Means and materials, published and self-devised.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Private lessons (by examination) in voice, supplemented by extra assignments, outside practice, and observation. Required attendance at recitals.

Music Theatre Repertoire E85.1064 30 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Directed study and performance of scenes from the music stage.

Music Theatre Workshop Techniques and Materials E85.1065 15 hours per point and hours arranged: 2 points. May be repeated for a total of 14 points. Fall, spring. Registration by permission of department. Students are encouraged to bring materials that may be used for audition as well as special material that they may wish to try out in the music revue. Development of performance and production skills in all aspects of music theatre. Improvisational activities lead to adaptation and/or creation of music theatre materials. Study culminates in performance.

Music History I: Medieval and Renaissance E85.1067 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. A survey of music history and musical style from antiquity through the Renaissance.

Music History II: Baroque and Classical E85.1068 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. The history of musical styles in the baroque and classical periods.

Electronic and Computer Music Literature E85.1070 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Analytical and theoretical concepts required grasping the aesthetic development of electronic and computer music compositions. The course emphasizes analysis and historical understanding of techniques of production and compositional ideas.

Jazz Improvisation Techniques I E85.1075 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E85.0039. An introduction to the techniques used in jazz instrumental and vocal improvisation. Examination of transcribed jazz solos and performance.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E85 Courses • 137

Jazz Improvisation Techniques II

New York University Jazz Ensemble

Jazz Arranging Techniques I, II

E85.1076 30 hours: 2 points. Spring.

E85.1089 60 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Open to the University community. Registration by audition only.

E85.1119,1120 30 hours and 15 hours arranged: 3 points each term. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E85.0036 and E85.0039 or by permission of instructor. E85.1119 is prerequisite to E85.1120.

An extension of E85.1075 with emphasis on style characteristics of selected jazz artists.

For description, see E85.0089.

Music History III: 19th Century E85.1077 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. The history of musical styles in the 19th century.

Music History IV: 20th Century

Percussion Ensemble E85.1090 60 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Open to the University community. Registration by audition only.

E85.1078 30 hours: 2 points. Spring.

Performance of standard, contemporary, and ethnic literature for percussion instruments.

Evolution of contemporary compositional techniques traced from impressionism to the latest avant-garde experiments.

Recital

New York University Chamber Ensembles

E85.1092 30-60 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Registration by permission of department.

E85.1080 60 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Open to the University community. Required each term of music majors and those registered for other ensembles.

For major recitals and accompanists, by advisement.

Study and performance of chamber music.

Advanced technical problems common to all phases of choral and instrumental conducting.

Intermediate Conducting E85.1093 30 hours: 2 points. Spring.

E85.1119: An introduction to the materials of jazz arranging through examination of music scores from early 20th-century sources to the present. Students produce their own arrangements. E85.1120: An extension of E85.1119 with special emphasis on arrangements for large jazz ensembles.

Reference and Research in Jazz E85.1121 30 hours and 15 hours arranged: 3 points. Fall. Open to the University community. Focus is on the evolution of jazz music from its origins to the present. Both traditional and contemporary reference and research sources are reviewed. These include the principal tools of library research as well as recordings, video, and live performances.

Techniques of Contemporary Music

Introduction to Piano Literature and Repertoire

Piano Literature and Repertoire I

E85.1122 30 hours: 2 points. Spring.

E85.1081 15 hours: 3 points. Fall.

E85.1096 15 hours: 3 points. Fall.

A survey and performance course on the keyboard music of the prebaroque period. Focuses on the music of Bach, Handel, Scarlatti, Blow, Bull, and others. Significant treatises, such as the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, are explored as well as baroque microtunings and their relationship to Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier.

New York University Band

A survey and performance course on the piano music of the romantic era, emphasizing the music of Chopin, Schumann, Liszt, and Brahms. In addition, late romantic composers such as Rachmaninoff and Scriabin are studied. The development of such romantic forms and character pieces as the nocturne, capriccio, and scherzo receive special attention, as well as their varied and distinctive harmonic vocabulary.

Contemporary harmonic techniques; extension of the chromatic system; six-tone and 12-tone scales. Modern use of the modes and other experimental techniques; application through original work.

E85.1083 90 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Open to the University community.

Piano Literature and Repertoire II

For description, see E85.0083.

New York University Choral Arts Society E85.1085 100 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Required each term of junior and senior vocal majors; open to others by advisement. Registration by audition only.

E85.1097 15 hours: 3 points. Fall. A survey and performance course on the piano repertoire of the 20th century. The eclectic quality of our present century is represented by a vast range of composers and styles. Ravel and Debussy, Schoenberg, Bartók, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Ives, Crumb, Sessions, Riley, and Harbison. The impact of the inclusion of such devices as synthesizers and recording technologies is assessed.

For description, see E85.0085.

New York University Orchestra E85.1087 60 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Open to the University community. Required each term of junior and senior instrumental students; open to others by audition. For description, see E85.0087.

Live Sound Reinforcement E85.1112 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. A focus on basic knowledge of live sound reinforcement; applicable to interested students in music, theatre, or the performing arts. Course topics introduce mixing consoles, room EQ, speakers, amplification systems, monitoring systems, and electrical requirements, as appropriate to the field.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Supervised Student Teaching of Music in the Elementary School E85.1141*† A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 3-4 points. Fall, spring. Restricted to music majors.

Supervised Student Teaching of Music in the Secondary School E85.1145*† A minimum of 20 school days (100 hours): 3-4 points. Fall, spring. Restricted to music majors.

Song Repertoire I and II E85.1164,1165 30 hours: 2 points each term. Fall, spring. E85.1164 is prerequisite to E85.1165. For juniors and seniors. A survey and performance course on the art song repertoire. Students study and perform repertoire from the genres of German lieder; French mélodie; and American, British, Italian, and Spanish songs.

138 • E85 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Music for Children E85.1201 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. Primarily for ELED and PRE (25N-125N-P) students. Music and movement experiences for the classroom (K-6); cognitive bases for aesthetic sensitivity and expression.

Music for Exceptional Children E85.1204 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Prerequisites: course work or experience in working with exceptional children, and permission of instructor. Music-movement experience for individuals with mildto-moderate impairment/dysfunction. Emphasis on learning strategies in heterogeneous school classrooms. Aesthetic factors in the individual education program.

Music Practicum: Handicapped Children E85.1205 30 hours: 1 point. Spring. Prerequisite: E85.1204. Music-movement experiences for individuals with moderate-to-severe and profound impairment. Aesthetic factors in the individualized education program.

Advertising and Promotion in the Music Industry E85.1214 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisites: E85.1221, E85.1222, E85.1700; corequisite: E85.1224. Introduction to the effective utilization of advertising in the music industry. Radio promotion, publicity campaigns, and media relations are examined.

The Economic and Legal Setting of the Music Industry E85.1222 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Required of all students in the music business program. Prerequisite: E85.1221; corequisite: E85.1700. Introduction to the legal environment as it pertains to profit-making music and to ethical considerations as well as social and political influences. Emphasis on copyright law and contract law as they affect the economics of the music industry.

Production and Artists and Repertoire in the Music Industry E85.1223 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Required of all students in the music business program. Prerequisites: E85.1214, E85.1222, E85.1224, E85.1700. Examination of the processes of A&R (artists and repertoire) production and manufacturing. Criteria for

music evaluation and genre categories are analyzed. The role of the studio for the producer and the artist.

Acting for Music Theatre II

Marketing and Merchandising in the Music Industry

Continuation of Acting for Music Theatre I, with more emphasis on scene study and the application of acting fundamentals to both contemporary and classical material.

E85.1224 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Required of all students in the music business program. Prerequisites: E85.1221, E85.1222, E85.1700; corequisite: E85.1214.

E85.1520 45 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring.

Acting for Music Theatre III E85.1521 45 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring.

Planning and sales in the commercial music market. The translation of creative work into a product. The specific marketing processes involved in the development, distribution, and merchandising of prerecorded product.

Continuation of Acting for Music Theatre II. Exploration of styles of acting as they relate to music theatre. Students perform scenes from selected works and periods that require a physical and vocal technique particular to that period.

Audio for Video II

Music Publishing

E85.1225 45 hours: 3 points. Spring, summer.

E85.1700 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E85.1221; corequisite: E85.1222. Required of all students in the music business program.

A continuation of E85.1010. This is an advanced and detailed study of the audiovisual production and postproduction process including digital recording techniques, with special emphasis on synchronization and the interfacing of SMPTE time code. Multitrack audio-sweetening techniques, including music editing, sound effects design, foley, and playback are discussed, as well as other issues that concern state-of-the-art postproduction.

Concert Management E85.1226 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisites: E85.1214, E85.1221, E85.1222, E85.1223, E85.1224, E85.1700. Required of all students in the music business program. Introduction to the concert business: contracts; the relationship between promoters, managers, and agents; marketing and ticket sales; and how the concert business relates to other segments of the music industry.

Aesthetics of Recording E85.1227 30 hours: 3 points. Fall. A critical listening study of music recordings, developing the student’s ability to define and evaluate aesthetic elements of recorded music, and discussion of the means to capture artistic performances. Open to all music students.

Film Music: Historical Aesthetics and Perspectives E85.1500 45 hours: 3-4 points. Fall, spring. From silent film’s pit orchestras to today’s synchronized high-tech productions, this course explores the great film composers from Max Steiner to John Williams through their techniques and influential styles. The course includes demonstrations within the classroom and in Studio C, an extensive music-forvideo production studio.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Overview of the music publishing industry: administration, acquisitions, promotion, distribution, music printing, revenue generation, and new avenues for exploitation.

MIDI for Nonmajors E85.1810 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. An introduction to MIDI (musical instrument digital interface), with an emphasis on sequencing, production, and arranging techniques. Open to students without previous experience in music technology.

Electronic Technology I E85.1817 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, summer. An introduction to analog electronic theory including solid-state devices. Ohm’s Law and related measurement techniques are explored. Students arrange for additional lab time to apply hands-on experience in basic circuit design.

Electronic Technology II E85.1818 45 hours: 3 points. Spring, summer. Continuation of study begun in Electronic Technology I, including an introduction to digital circuitry, simple computer programming techniques, digital processing applied to music with specific relevance to computer music synthesis and MIDI.

Internship in Music Technology E85.1820 50-300 hours: 0-6 points. 50 hours per point. 150 hours minimum. Fall, spring, summer. Assignment to studios and/or corporations for on-thejob training. Junior or senior standing only.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E89 Courses • 139

E89: DANCE EDUCATION Dance Alignment I E89.0011 60 hours: 1 point. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 points. Fall. Registration by permission of program director. Introduction to the fundamental Pilates-based principles of alignment for the correction of faulty neuromuscular habituation in everyday movement. Focus on transfer of these basic adjustments to dance warmups, one’s personal structure, correct use of the ballet barre, and centering for varied cultural posture and dance demands.

Introduction to Modern Dance E89.0012 60 hours: 2 points. May be repeated for a total of 6 points. Fall, spring. Principally for nondance majors. Introduction to modern dance, including analysis of movement in dance technique and improvisation.

Dance Club

Origins of Contemporary Dance

E89.0039 45 hours: 1 point, by advisement. Fall, spring. Required each term of all undergraduate dance majors for a minimum of 6 terms.

E89.1012 45 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Provides participation in and planning of departmental dance activities.

Rhythmic Analysis and Percussion for Dance E89.0041 60 hours: 2 points. Fall. May be repeated for a total of 6 points. Fundamentals of sound for dance accompaniment. Rhythmic and movement analysis. Students prepare percussion scores for their own dance studies and gain practice in composing for and accompanying others. Satisfies eurythmics requirement in music, with adviser’s permission.

Beginning Ballet E89.0014* 60-90 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Open only by audition.

Continuation of training in basic technical skills in ballet.

Fundamentals of ballet technique including special emphasis on placement and utilizing individual anatomical structures most efficiently.

Independent Study

E89.0016 45-67 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Required of all incoming dance majors to a maximum of 2 points; open to nonmajors by permission only.

Tap Dance E89.1013 45 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Basic course in jazz tap, waltz clog, and soft-shoe styles of tap dance. Relates the cultural and generic origins of these styles to their introduction to and development in theatre as a performing art. Includes fundamental skills and traditional steps and sequences for creating tap dance choreography.

Introduction to Dance Composition Intermediate Ballet E89.0044* 45-90 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Open only by audition.

Beginning Modern Dance Techniques

Survey of varied forms and styles of dance and their social and cultural contexts. Discussion and viewing of dance in selected periods of its development from early times to the present. Class attends films shown at the Museum and Library of Performing Arts at Lincoln Center.

E89.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring, summer; hours to be arranged.

E89.1017 60 hours: 2 points. Fall. Basic elements of choreography. Students compose and perform dances.

Jazz Dance Technique E89.1029 30 hours: 2 points. May be repeated for a total of 4 points. Fall, spring. For nondance majors.

For description, see page 167.

Analysis of jazz as a dance discipline—introductory level. Includes composition.

Common Hour Dance

Advanced Jazz Dance Technique

E89.1001‡ 45 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring.

E89.1030 60 hours: 1 point. May be repeated for a total of 3 points. Fall, spring. For dance majors; others by audition.

Fundamentals of technique including placement, flexibility, motor skills, and some improvisation.

Weekly meeting time for graduate students or participation in workshops and concert production, etc.

Survey of Folk, Square, and Social Dance Forms

Senior Dance Project

Analysis of jazz as a dance discipline at the advanced level. Includes composition.

E89.1003 30 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Registration by permission of instructor.

Effort/Shape Movement Analysis

E89.0021 60 hours: 2 points. Spring. Initial identification and practice of fundamental movements whose various combinations comprise European and indigenous American social and folk dance forms. Course covers performance, contradance and square dance calling, and teaching prototypes of these forms. Visits to outside functions.

Jazz Dance Techniques E89.0029 60 hours: 2 points. Spring. Required of all dance majors and minors; others by audition. Introduction analysis and practice of jazz dance.

Required of senior students in dance. Choreography and presentation of group dance composition.

Dance Alignment II E89.1011 60 hours: 2 points; 75 hours: 3 points (individual tutorial hours to be arranged via instructor or program director). Spring. Pre- or corequisite: E89.0011 or permission of program director required. Extension of the basic Pilates series and principles to intermediate and advanced neuromuscular patterning. Focus on methods for achieving individualized goals and applied instructional means of reducing correction time. Use of specialized Pilates apparatus resensitizes the body for kinetic retention and trains the teacher as a keen observer and structural analyst of varied dance forms and styles.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E89.1041 45 hours: 2 points. Fall, spring. Registration by permission of program director. Introductory experience in Laban’s system of qualitative movement analysis, including the basic body, space, and dynamic elements. Provides skill practice and observation, particularly in understanding one’s personal movement style.

Advanced Ballet E89.1074 45-90 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Registration by permission of program director. Advanced technical skills with emphasis on continuity, phrasing, and performance in American balletic style.

140 • E89 to E90 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Advanced Technique: Modern Dance

Historical Development of Dance I

E89.1075 45-90 hours: 1 point. Fall, spring. Section 1: (Hawkins-based) (minimum of two days); section 2: (eclectic) (1 or 2 points: minimum of 2 hours per point); section 3: (improvisation). Registration of nondance majors by permission of program director only. Required of dance majors for a maximum of 6 points toward degree.

E89.1273 45 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Advanced technical skills with emphasis on continuity, phrasing, and performance in a modern style.

Modern Dance Production

Advanced Dance Practicum E89.1076 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring. Registration by permission of dance program adviser. Individualized projects in dance, research, production, choreography, or related arts for advanced students in the arts.

Dance Composition: Group Forms E89.1118 60 hours: 2 points. Spring. Application of elements of choreography to large group works. Explores the individual choreographer’s role as a director.

Dance Notation E89.1141 60 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E89.0041 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Introduction to the history of movement notation and other systems of notation. Basic understanding of movement and its visual analysis through the Labanotation system. Work in theory, reading, writing, and some computer applications.

Methods and Materials in Teaching Dance E89.1265 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Discussion of the theories, skills, and dance techniques, with laboratory work, basic to the establishment of a teaching method. Course is designed to prepare teachers of dance for private and public junior and senior high schools as well as community centers in the city of New York; includes dance class observations.

Dance Repertory E89.1271 60 hours: 2 points. Spring. Students rehearse and perform dance scores and dances choreographed by faculty and guest artists.

General survey of the role of dance from the earliest cultures to modern times. In addition to classical antiquity and the Renaissance, the course briefly traces the development of theatrical dance from preclassic dance forms up to but exclusive of American influences and of modern ballet.

E89.1284 120 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisites: medical certificate of health and permission of the instructor. Required of all DANT and DPC, HEA, HST, TES, THE dance majors. Concentrated course in the staging and presentation of modern dances. Provides current learning in the theory and practice of lighting, staging, and makeup, with technical and choreographic rehearsals for concerts.

Methods of Accompaniment for Dance E89.1309 30 hours: 2 points. Spring. Prerequisites: E89.0041 and E89.1017, or permission of program director. Survey of the different kinds of accompaniment (live and recorded music, percussion scores, the spoken word). Students select or prepare accompaniment for dance techniques and compositions. Consideration of historical and stylistic factors.

American Dance Heritage E89.1401 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. An application of multiple historical resources and of research techniques in the teaching of the history of American dance.

Teaching Creative Rhythmic Movement E89.1453 45 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Creative movement theories, techniques, and skills are actively explored for the teaching of children. Emphasis on the use of dance as an expressive, creative, interacting, and learning aesthetic/educational experience. Includes dance class observations. Meets city and state certification requirements in this area.

Teaching Performance of Dance and Related Activities for Children E89.1454 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Provides opportunities for students to plan choreography and to view and design dance concerts that recognize the developmental needs and aesthetic interests of children.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Introduction to Dance Movement Therapy E89.1502 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Introduction to the theories, principles, and techniques of movement in the dance therapy field. Focus is on nonverbal communication and body awareness.

African Dance E89.1542 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. A survey course in African dances with accompanying songs, music, and simple instruments of the regions of West, East, Central, and South Africa.

Student Teaching in Dance: Elementary School E89.1607*† 120 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Speech and dance major requirements must be completed. Supervised student teaching of dance on the elementary school level (grades K-6). Includes classroom observation and seminar conferences.

Student Teaching in Dance: Secondary School E89.1608*† 120 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Speech and dance major requirements must be completed. Supervised student teaching of dance on the secondary school level (grades 7-12). Includes classroom observation and seminar conferences.

Kinesiology for the Dancer E89.1811 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Registration of nondance majors by permission of program director. Study of the basic mechanical principles affecting the physiological functioning and anatomical structure of the human body. Dance laboratory application of these principles to body alignment, placement, and dynamic posture for dance.

E90: ART AND ART PROFESSIONS Introduction to Jewelry E90.0021 60 hours: 3 points. Open to all students. Beginning and traditional techniques for jewelry and metalsmithing. Through demonstrations and practice, students create individual projects in a variety of materials. Discussions and assignments consider preconceived notions about jewelry as well as structural design problems.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E90 Courses • 141

Art and Contemporary Culture I

Fundamentals of Painting I, II

E90.0037 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Required for art majors.

E90.0332,0333 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Open only to art majors.

Combines a survey of artworks from antiquity through the Enlightenment with a critical exploration of the relationship of visual expression to the changing social contexts of the periods. Discussions include the role of art within both non-Western and European cultures, as well as the influence of past cultures on contemporary issues.

Aimed at each student’s personal development, offering maximum freedom within a course structure designed to present a vast number of formal and expressive ideas, concepts, and procedures in the context of the studio. Fundamental techniques introduced; individual and class critiques, discussions, assignments to visit museums and galleries; readings and extensive out-of-class problems.

Art and Contemporary Culture II E90.0038 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Required for art majors. Traces the evolution of the arts from the 1800s through 1945. Movements such as romanticism, realism, and modernism are discussed in relation to social and technological developments ranging from colonial imperialism to the industrial revolution. The role of these movements in current culture is an ongoing focus.

Visual Arts (Sophomore Seminar) E90.0099 60 hours: 3 points. Fall. Open only to art majors. A seminar course that examines the historical development of the arts within a theoretical framework, addressing a range of models from structuralism and semiotics to modern and postmodern paradigms. The class is designed for practicing artists, allowing students to gain the skills and confidence to express their artistic objectives in critical writing, art making, and verbal analysis. Each student is responsible for oral presentations, works of art generated through research, and written statements about their own artistic objectives.

Fundamentals of Sculpture I, II E90.0342,0343 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Two semesters of this course are required for all studio majors. Open only to art majors. Explores the medium of sculpture through the principles of three-dimensional design and the concepts that drive developments in contemporary art. Projects may include welding, mold making, and the use of woodworking tools, as well as the use of sculpture as costume, performance, environment, or kinetic form. Students use a variety of materials from wood and cardboard to metal, plaster, and found objects to expand their understanding of form and space.

as students explore a wide variety of forms and applications in relation to their projects. The class is held in a multimedia lab, and students work intensively with Macintosh programs such as PhotoShop, Quark, Director, Pagemill, and Illustrator.

Fundamentals of Photography I, II E90.0362,0363 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Open only to art majors. Introductory course in the use of a 35mm camera with black-and-white film. Contact printing, enlarging, and developing of film are taught. Readings in the history and theories of photography are assigned. Photography as an art form of aesthetic choices is emphasized. Students provide their own cameras with manual light meter exposure controls and are asked to buy film and paper. Enlargers and photographic chemicals are provided in class.

Fundamentals of Printmaking E90.0373 60 hours: 3 points. Spring. The expression of lines and linear structures both in representational and abstract modes are explored through printmaking with black-and-white and color prints employing such techniques as etching, engraving, drypoint, and woodcut.

Sculpture: Anatomy for the Artist E90.0346, E90.1346 60 hours: 3 points. Fall. Open only to art majors. Atelier course offered on two levels. E90.0346: freshmen and sophomores. E90.1346: juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Introduction to Design E90.0380 60 hours: 3 points. Fall. Open to all majors.

Introduction to Ceramics

Analysis of the skeletal and muscular structure of the human figure through sculpture as a basis for artistic interpretation. Modeling of the skeleton and the human figure in studio accompanied by lectures and demonstrations.

E90.0104 60 hours: 3 points. Open to all students.

Fundamentals of Video Art

Introduction to the field of graphic design. Assigned projects and class critiques, as well as lectures, research, and readings, allow students to develop an imaginative and personal relationship to design and its history. Both traditional and digital technologies are used to create an in-depth exploration of contemporary typography. The course encourages innovative design solutions through the use of unconventional projects such as typographic diaries, bookbinding, or mail art.

E90.0358 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Open only to art majors.

Atelier in Design

An introduction to the technical problems of making, decorating, glazing, and firing ceramic forms, while providing opportunities for understanding and developing sensitivities to clay as an art form.

Fundamentals of Drawing I, II E90.0322,0323 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Open only to art majors. Two semesters of this course are required for all art studio majors. An exploration in the studio of a variety of contemporary processes, techniques, and experiences in drawing with a variety of marking implements. Assigned independent work, term project, and field trips to galleries and museums.

Intensive exploration of video as an artistic medium. Students are introduced to aesthetic, conceptual, and historical aspects of video, while developing an individual vision within their own projects. Technical instruction includes the creative use of video cameras and the basics of video editing. Assigned readings, video screenings, field trips, and group critiques are regular elements of the course.

Fundamentals of Computer Art E90.0359 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. Open only to art majors. An introduction to the computer as a tool for visual artists, this class examines both studio art and mass media in terms of their potential for creative expression. Attention is paid to individual interests and experience

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E90.0481 60 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: E90.0380 or equivalent experience. Builds on a basic understanding of graphic design to help students refine their skills and develop more personally expressive ways of solving problems through visual communication. Assignments, readings, and research projects allow students to consider the complex nature of graphic design, both within their own work and in society at large. Both traditional and digital approaches to typography and layout are incorporated within a wide range of assignments. A priority is placed on the use of concepts to dictate design techniques and on the pursuit of a genuinely creative vision.

142 • E90 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Independent Study E90.1000 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring; hours to be arranged. Students must have the approval of their adviser and the art department chairperson to register for independent study. For description, see page 167.

Undergraduate Projects E90.1022,1023 20-60 hours: 1-4 points. Fall, spring. Open only to art majors or by permission of the undergraduate director. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. (E90.1023 is reserved for seniors; portfolio approval by instructor is required.) Integrates the theory and practice of contemporary art, combining studio projects with reading assignments, which address the larger philosophical and cultural implications of artistic activity. These praxis courses allow students to work in an interdisciplinary manner, using media of their own choosing to explore and respond to the issues raised by assigned readings and class discussions. Course topics vary from semester to semester. To enable students to work with a range of media during the course, students receive studio workspace when available.

Modern Art and Contemporary Culture E90.1050 30 hours: 3 points. Spring. Open to nonart majors. Examines the impact of modernism in both its historic and contemporary relationships to culture and society, through the study of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the media arts from the early 1900s through 1945. Art history with a theoretical and aesthetic emphasis. Relates the art of the period to political, social, and philosophical issues and to current debates. Works of art are considered from slides, films, reproductions, and museum and gallery visits.

History of Art Since 1945 E90.1051 45 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: one course in art history. Open to nonart majors. Study of painting, sculpture, and media arts from 1945 to the present with background information concerning development of styles and movements in art in the 20th century. Lectures, discussions, slides, and gallery and museum visits.

Creative Art Activities in the Elementary Classroom E90.1057 (E25.1057) 30 hours: 2 points. Fall. For elementary education students only; others by permission of instructor. Planning and organizing classroom experiences in creative art; developing aesthetic, expressive possibilities in all of children’s learning. Individual and group studio experience, observation, and reading.

Sculpture: Materials and Techniques E90.1344 60 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: two semesters of sculpture. An examination of the materials, tools, and techniques available to the three-dimensional artist. The various potentials of traditional as well as new materials are explored. Topics, such as mold making, vary from semester to semester.

Introduction to Video Art Contemporary Art E90.1113 45 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: E90.1051. Open to art and nonart majors. New art and new definitions of art and the artist are discussed. Major attention is paid to the New York scene with guest lectures by artists and visits to galleries, museums, and other major sites in the current art system.

E90.1352 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Studio course designed for art and nonart majors. Video art has become one of the most widely used media art forms because it allows both the artistic concentration of photography and the free-flowing imagery of movement. Students acquire rudimentary skills while working toward a personal statement in video.

Introduction to Computer Art Undergraduate Internship E90.1302 45 hours per point: 1-6 points. Fall, spring. Open only to art majors by faculty approval. Prerequisite: junior standing or above, by advisement. Students are assisted in finding individualized placements with recognized artists, museums, galleries, and nonprofit or commercial businesses within the visual arts. Interns work closely with NYU faculty to assess their progress and define learning goals.

E90.1354 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Studio course designed for art and nonart majors. The use of the computer to augment and expand conceptualization and expression has provided the artist with some of the most important new means for visual thinking. Students learn how to use the computer as an extension of the visualization process and its specific applications in both two-dimensional and threedimensional art.

Introduction to Photography Introduction to Drawing E90.1320 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Studio course designed for nonart majors. Assignments/critiques/demonstrations related to the basic elements of drawing.

Introduction to Painting E90.1330 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Studio course designed for nonart majors. Hands-on introduction to the translation of the visual experience into painting. The interpretative, formal, expressive, and technical aspects of painting are explored through a series of studio situations. Discussions, slide lectures, and museum and gallery visits highlight individual work.

Introduction to Sculpture E90.1340 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Studio course designed for nonart majors. Assignments/critiques/demonstrations related to the basic elements of sculpture.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E90.1360 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Studio course designed for art and nonart majors. A hands-on introduction to the use of photography as a medium of documentation and expression. Assignments and critiques enhance the development of independent individual work while developing photographic skills and techniques. Students provide their own cameras. Enlargers and photographic chemicals are provided in class.

Introduction to Lithography E90.1374 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Studio course designed for art and nonart majors. Hands-on introduction to lithography. Studio work in plate and stone lithography. Stone-graining, crayon and tusche drawing, processing, proofing, and editionprinting procedures. Lectures and demonstrations.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • E90 Courses • 143

Introduction to Relief Printmaking E90.1376 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Studio course designed for art and nonart majors. Hands-on introduction to relief printmaking. Studio work in linoleum and woodblock cutting. Western and Japanese techniques are featured.

Introduction to Photo Processes in Printmaking

Discussion, slide lectures, and museum and gallery visits support studio activities.

Painting II E90.1533 60 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: E90.1530. Emphasis is on the development of skills, composition, and interpretative ability in the individual painter.

E90.1378 60 hours: 3 points. Fall. Studio course designed for art and nonart majors. Hands-on introduction to photo processes in printmaking. An intensive introductory-level studio course in photographic applications to intaglio, lithography, and screen printmaking.

Developing and understanding of the nature of sculpture and the critical dialogue that surrounds it. Students have regular access to the sculpture shop, where available equipment includes wood and metal tools, as well as plaster and mold-making facilities. Projects explore the conceptual and formal properties of sculpture, and an individual approach is encouraged. Evaluation of current gallery exhibitions and assigned readings is an important supplement to studio assignments.

E90.1390 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Explores the aesthetic concepts and techniques of contemporary jewelry construction, employing a variety of materials. Aspects of jewelry as a craft are considered.

Jewelry II E90.1391 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: E90.0021 or equivalent experience. Exploration of jewelry making as an expressive medium for small-scale sculpture. Traditional techniques for jewelry and metalsmithing, including casting, soldering, and polishing. Students create individual projects in a variety of materials with class critiques and gallery assignments.

Drawing I E90.1520 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E90.0322,0323. Representational drawing course involving freehand rendering and perspective. Includes life, nature, and still life objects. Studio work, out-of-class assignments, lectures, and demonstrations.

Drawing II E90.1523 60 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisites: two courses in drawing. Greater emphasis placed on the figure as a key for form and the use of color as it relates to composition. Special attention to individual work and expression.

Painting I E90.1530 60 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E90.0332. Course progresses from monochrome toward a full color spectrum, developing skills of paint handling, color mixing, composition, and interpretation.

E90.1552 60 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E90.0359 or permission of instructor. The aesthetic and personal potential of the computer for the artist is defined. Students work on individual computer projects from the planning stages through actual programming.

Computer Art II Sculpture I

Jewelry I

Computer Art I

E90.1540 4 points. Fall. Prerequisite: one course in sculpture.

Sculpture II E90.1541 4 points. Spring. Prerequisite: one course in sculpture. Provides a critical framework for students interested in building a personal body of work using sculpture materials. Assignments and readings focus on the transformation of ideas into works of art and place artistic production within the context of recent movements in sculpture as well as broader cultural issues. Students have a great deal of autonomy in conceiving and fabricating their projects. Technical assistance is given on an individual basis, and students have regular access to the sculpture shop, where available equipment includes wood and metal tools, as well as welding, plaster, and mold-making facilities.

Video Art I E90.1550 60 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisite: E90.0358 or permission of instructor. Assignments/critiques/demonstrations related to the specific level in which the course is being taken. Use of the video camera as an art medium. Stresses technical skills and explores experimental possibilities of the medium. Students are required to produce a one-minute video art production.

Video Art II E90.1551 60 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: E90.1550 or permission of instructor. Continuation of Video Art I.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E90.1553 60 hours: 3 points. Spring. Prerequisite: E90.0359 or permission of instructor. The varieties of computer art are explored from conceptual art to computer pattern painting. Each student develops and uses a personal and visual computer style. Projects are evaluated in terms of the student’s project design objectives.

Black-and-White Photography I, II E90.1560,1561 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: one course in photography. Advanced course in black-and-white photography. Emphasis is on the creation of a body of prints dealing with one subject or theme. Aesthetic decisions made by the individual in choice of subject matter and technique are considered. Lectures, technical demonstrations, and individual critiques are included. Readings on individual photographers, aesthetics, and darkroom techniques are assigned. Critiques by visiting photographers/artists are held.

Color Photography I, II E90.1562,1563 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: E90.1360 or equivalent. Advanced techniques in type C and type R printing as well as color negative and slide film development are taught. Examines the capabilities of various film stocks, lighting problems, the use of color filters and color separation for Kwik Print and Dye Transfer printing. Emphasis is on making a substantial portfolio of work on one subject. Includes readings on the aesthetics and history of color photography.

Silkscreen I, II E90.1574,1575 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisite: E90.0373. Exploration of varied screen printing techniques and their characteristics: paper, blockout, resist, and cut film stencils; construction and selection of materials used. Multicolored printmaking, studio work in photographic screen printing techniques, printmaking on different materials and surfaces (plastic, paper, wood, glass, mirrors, etc.), mixed media. Demonstrations and lectures.

144 • E90 Courses • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Projects in Drawing

Projects in Sculpture

Advanced Projects in Painting

E90.1624 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: two semesters of Drawing.

E90.1645,1646 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: two semesters of Sculpture.

Focus on particular subjects or techniques allows students to broaden skills and expression. Past topics have included the figure, the landscape, grisaille, pastels, charcoal. Projects are chosen as a result of both faculty and student interest.

Emphasis on specialized materials or techniques allows students to broaden the range of their skills and expression. Past topics have included clay, fiber, wood, cold glass, hot glass, low bas-relief, high relief, and jewelry. Projects are chosen as a result of student and faculty interest.

E90.1930,1931 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: two semesters of Advanced Painting.

Projects in Painting E90.1636 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: two semesters of Painting. Consideration of particular techniques allows students to broaden the range of their skills and expression. Past topics have included watercolor, trompe l’oeil, collage, mixed media, off-the-stretcher, narrative painting. Projects are chosen as a result of faculty and student interest.

Projects in Video Art E90.1650,1651 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E90.1550,1551 or equivalent experience. Focus on particular techniques allows students to broaden the range of their skills and expression. Past topics include digital sound for video and digital editing.

Ceramics I

Projects in Computer Art

E90.1640 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring.

E90.1652,1653 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: E90.1552,1553 or equivalent experience.

Fundamentals of ceramic sculpture. Study and studio work in construction methods, modeling techniques, decoration, and firing methods. Illustrated lectures and discussions.

Ceramics II E90.1641 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Open to all students. Prerequisite: E90.0104 or equivalent experience. Exploration of clay as an expressive medium with experiences in hand building, throwing, surface decoration, and preparation of slips and glazes. During the second half of the year, attention is given to exploring individual expressions with class critiques and gallery and museum assignments.

E90.1642,1643 60 hours: 3 points. Fall: E90.1642; spring: E90.1643. Held at UrbanGlass. Open only to art majors. Intensive workshop provides a survey of contemporary glass-working techniques through a combination of studio instruction and technical lectures. The studio areas, which include glasscasting, glassblowing, neon, and cold working, are intended to provide the student with the rudiments of each technique and to enable the student to choose a technique for further study. No previous glass experience is necessary.

Advanced Projects in Sculpture E90.1941,1942 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: two semesters of Advanced Sculpture. Topics selected by faculty and students to reflect their artistic preoccupations or to provide research in particular skills, subjects, or trends in sculpture.

Advanced Projects in Video Art E90.1950,1951 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: two semesters of Advanced Art in Media. Students create independent video art. Video art standards are analyzed and evaluated. Field trips required.

Focus on particular techniques allows students to broaden the range of their skills and expression. Past topics include art on the Web and advanced techniques in digital art.

Advanced Projects in Computer Art

Projects in Photography

Students develop major computer art projects that are fully realized and represent an evolution from computer sketches to a finished work. Both ongoing critiques and postproduction critiques are provided.

E90.1664 60 hours: 3 points. Fall. Prerequisites: two semesters of Photography. Students work directly with internationally recognized figures in photography. Topics for workshops range from the techniques of established photographers to discussions of issues in photographic theory, history, and criticism.

Projects in Printmaking Projects in Sculpture: Glass

Topics selected by faculty and students to reflect their artistic preoccupations or to provide research in particular skills, subjects, or trends in painting.

E90.1670,1671 60 hours: 3 points. Fall: E90.1670; spring: E90.1671. Prerequisites: two semesters of Printmaking. Emphasis on specialized materials and techniques for the printmaker allow students to broaden the range of their skills and expression. Past topics have included art of the letter form, book arts, xerography, papermaking. Projects are chosen as a result of faculty and student interest.

Advanced Projects in Drawing E90.1920,1921 60 hours: 3 points. Fall: E90.1920; spring: E90.1921. Prerequisites: two semesters of Advanced Drawing. Topics selected by faculty and students to reflect their artistic preoccupations or to provide research in particular skills, subjects, or trends in drawing.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

E90.1952,1953 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: two semesters of Advanced Art in Media.

Advanced Projects in Photography E90.1960,1961 60 hours: 3 points. Fall, spring. Prerequisites: two semesters of Advanced Photography. Topics selected by faculty and students to reflect their artistic preoccupations or to provide research in particular skills, subjects, or trends in photography.

Art, Culture, and Society E90.1995 60 hours: 4 points. Fall, spring. The visual arts are explored in the full context of the socioeconomic, political, and ethical forces that have shaped them, with particular attention to recurring patterns and themes. Questions of content, accessibility, and the role of the creative artist in social change are explored from Periclean Athens to contemporary society focusing on definitions of the individual and ideas of social order. The course includes field trips and guest lectures to supplement the instructor’s lectures and class discussions.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Student Activities/University Services • 145

Student Activities/University Services

Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs Patricia M. Carey is responsible for the administration of various student development and administrative services, which include Registration Services, Counseling and Student Services, International Student Services, Special Student Advisement, and Alumni Relations.

financial aid, career services, undergraduate admissions, housing, and student life. For further information, contact Student Services, Joseph and Violet Pless Hall, 2nd Floor; [emailprotected]; (212) 998-5065.

Dean Carey works closely with the academic units of the school in facilitating the advisement process and other policies and procedures that derive from faculty and school action, such as student academic progress, student discipline, student awards and honors, and the New Student Seminars.

Counseling and Student Services

The Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs maintains close liaison with the various student services administered by the University, including health services,

To help promote healthy personal, educational, and career development within a diverse undergraduate and graduate student body while complementing the excellence of the academic program, a professional staff, which includes on-site counselors from University Counseling Services and the Office of Career Services, offers a range of individual and group counseling, as well as skills development workshops and seminars.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Tutoring and advisement, as well as the Early Intervention Program—which assists new freshman and transfer students—are components of the staff’s role in fulfilling basic, yet essential, support. New Student Orientation Programs, the New Student Seminar, student receptions, awards ceremonies, and graduation celebrations are carefully planned to ensure the quality of campus life. The Senior Legacy Project is an initiative that connects graduating seniors with their roles as active alumni. The Dean’s Travel Colloquium and Scholars’ Programs underscore the school’s commitment to outstanding achievement, community service, and leadership. Student leadership initiatives are a vital facet of student development and involvement. Staff members in the Office of Counseling and Student

146 • Student Activities/University Services • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Services assist and advise numerous Steinhardt School of Education student organizations. All Steinhardt School of Education undergraduate students are members of the Undergraduate Student Government (USG), which includes in its objectives developing programs, activities, and services to help meet the cultural, social, and professional needs of its constituency. This organization is governed by an executive board of officers and representatives from each program curriculum in The Steinhardt School of Education. The USG plays an active role in the governance of the school and University and is responsible for appointing students to serve on designated school/University committees. Additional information about the USG may be obtained by contacting the USG Office, Joseph and Violet Pless Hall; telephone: (212) 998-5350.

Office for International Students and Scholars The Office for International Students and Scholars (OISS) coordinates services for international students and scholars. The OISS issues certificates of eligibility for F-1 and J-1 student visas, advises on all matters pertaining to student immigration status, and serves as the University’s liaison to the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service. Advisers are available every day to assist students with immigration, employment, financial, personal, and cross-cultural concerns. The OISS sponsors programs to facilitate international students’ adjustment to their new environment and to ensure continued success during their studies at New York University. Programs include a comprehensive orientation; a University-based friendship program that provides international students the opportunity to share common interests with NYU faculty, staff, alumni, and friends; trips to spots of local and regional cultural interest; cross-cultural and educational seminars; and festivals celebrating U.S. and world cultures. The office is located at 561 La Guardia Place and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday; telephone: (212) 998-4720; E-mail: [emailprotected]; Web site: www.nyu.edu/pages/osl/offices/oiss.

Students with Disabilities The Henry and Lucy Moses Center for Students with Disabilities provides services to students with qualified disabilities within all the schools and colleges of the University. Located at 240 Greene Street, 4th Floor, the center provides services to

students with hearing and visual impairments, mobility impairments, learning disabilities and attention deficit disorders, chronic illnesses, and psychiatric disorders. Student disability files presented to the center are confidential and are not part of a student’s official academic records at NYU. In order to qualify for services and accommodations, a student must present appropriate, recent documentation of a disability and complete an intake interview with a counselor at the center. Services include the provision of sign language interpreters, readers, notetakers, and other auxiliary aids. The center works in conjunction with academic and administrative departments in providing assistance with examination accommodations, registration, and housing. Learning specialists are available to provide one-on-one assistance to eligible students under the center’s auspices. The center also sponsors programs and workshops, as well as the CHOICES career enhancement program. Limited tuition aid is available to qualified students. Students with disabilities, supported by reasonable accommodations, must be able to function in their academic and residential environments. Supported by such accommodations, they are expected to meet the requirements and expectations of their academic programs, to follow the established guidelines for securing and remaining in residential living space, and to adhere to University student conduct and disciplinary codes. Students with disabilities must be able to function in as independent manner as possible and to seek appropriate assistance in a reasonable and timely manner. University resources and staff cannot be expected to meet all of a student’s needs associated with managing a disability. It is expected that students will follow appropriate health regimens, secure appropriate medical and therapeutic assistance from qualified practitioners at NYU or in the New York City area, and arrange necessary support services (i.e., transportation, individual monitoring of needs, financial assistance, personal care) that NYU does not provide. Telephone (212) 998-4980 (voice and TTY) or visit our Web site (www.nyu.edu/osl/csd) for more information.

Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Student Services The Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Student Services exists to create campus environments that are inclusive and supportive of student diversity in the areas of

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

sexual orientation and gender identification. The office offers a number of support services and programs including the following: • Weekly discussion groups • Student clubs • Cultural, educational, and social programs • Community service opportunities • Rainbow Connection mentor program • Outspoken peer education program • Lending library • Information on campus and community resources, including health services, spiritual organizations, recreational and social opportunities, volunteer opportunities, jobs, and internships Our programs include lunch discussions on various topics, social events, major speakers, performances, and movie nights. Office staff members are always available to speak with students about coming out and related personal issues. The Office of LGBT Student Services houses a lending library and a number of resources regarding everything from health to legal issues to referrals to social events within the New York City LGBT community. The Office of LGBT Student Services is also dedicated to advocacy, education, training, and consulting. Outspoken is our peer education program that trains LGBT students and allies on issues of importance to the LGBT community and prepares them to present this information to the campus community. The Safe Zone program trains a growing network of students, faculty, and staff across the University who are willing and prepared to provide support and information to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning students. The office is located at 244 Greene Street, Rooms 305 and 306. Students can also reach us at (212) 998-4424 or [emailprotected] We are open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. For more information and a listing of upcoming events and programs, visit our Web site at www.nyu.edu.lgbt.

Office for African American, Latino, and Asian American Student Services For more than 10 years, the Office for African American, Latino, and Asian American Student Services (OASIS) at New York University has sought to promote educational success by cultivating a community for students of color. OASIS is dedicated to helping students achieve excellence through addressing the intellectual, cultural, and social issues of African American, Latino, and Asian American students.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Student Activities/University Services • 147

EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL PROGRAMS • Educational and Cultural Institute/Under1Roof • OASIS Speaker Series • -ISM Project • Diversity Day GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL INITIATIVES • Future Administrators Cultural Training Seminar (FACTS) Program • Institute for the Recruitment of Teachers • Career Advantage Internship Program • Diversity Career Fair • Making It in Media PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT AND LEADERSHIP • The OASIS Leadership Institute (OLI) • Mentorship Program • OASIS Peer Ambassadors • Brothers for Success • Financial Aid Seminar Series • The Culture Shop ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT SERVICES • Strategic Networking for Academic Performance (SNAP) • Timbuktu Academic Resource Center SOCIAL AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS • Welcome Reception • Holiday Celebration • Nia Awards Celebration • University Commencement Reception • OASIS in the Community Day • Graduate Students of Color Socials • The Alumni of Color Network (AOC) GENERAL RESOURCES AND SERVICES • OASIS On-Line Calendar (calendar.nyu.edu/oasis) • Scholarship/Grant Information • The OASIS Spirit • Counselor-in-residence • OASIS Information Sessions • The Official OASIS Web Site (www.oasis.nyu.edu)

The office, located at 240 Greene Street, 3rd Floor, is open Monday, Tuesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. The main telephone number is (212) 998-4343.

Student Life The Office of Student Life, located at 240 Greene Street, is the focal point and coordinator for student events on campus. Construction should be completed by winter 2002-2003 on a new student center, which will house student clubs, activity spaces, a large theatre, lounges, and other facilities. (Contact the Office of Student Activities for specific information; [212] 998-4700.) The place to go with a problem or a question is the Office of Student Life; telephone: (212) 998-4959. The staff has extensive knowledge of both University and student issues. They can direct a student to resources within and outside the University, relay comments or complaints to the appropriate people, or check into established policies on the student’s behalf. The staff works with the student councils, the University Committee on Student Life, and many clubs and organizations. This office also coordinates all-University orientation programs for undergraduate and graduate students, Parents’ Helpline, the Human Relations Committee, and student leader recognition programs. It also publishes the NYU Student’s Guide. A wide variety of maps, NYU informational material, and brochures on New York City’s cultural institutions is available.

Office of Student Activities The Office of Student Activities (OSA) provides comprehensive programs and services that support student clubs and organizations and assist student leaders in achieving their educational, personal, and career goals. It is home to allUniversity clubs and organizations (groups with membership open to all NYU students), as well as many of the school clubs and organizations. Over 250 NYU student clubs and organizations annually register with the OSA. The OSA provides numerous programs and services for students. They include, but are not limited to, club advisement; fall and spring club fairs; student leadership programs such as the OSA GOLD Program and the Club Management Conference; leadership retreats; social justice and civic engagement programs; new club development programs; and cultural programs, including the Harambe Alliance, South-Asian Student Alliance, Pride Month, La Herencia Latina,

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

African Heritage Month, Womyn’s Herstory Month, Asian Heritage Month, and Diversity Week. In addition, the office publishes the OSA Weekly Calendar of Club Events on the NYU home page and in the Washington Square News. OSA also oversees the Club Resource Center (CRC), club offices, and mailboxes at the Student Activities Center, 244 Greene Street. Visit the OSA Web site, www.osa.nyu.edu, for a complete listing of OSA registered clubs, their mission statements, and contact information along with a comprehensive directory of the OSA programs, services, and event calendars plus links to other important Web sites. The office is located at 244 Greene Street; telephone (212) 998-4700.

Program Office The Program Office is the home office for Program Board and Ticket Central and also coordinates events and programs for the Commuter Circle. The office coordinates Big Fun Days, a series of fun and innovative special events that start in September with Bobcat Day and end the year with the Strawberry Festival. For information about all Program Office events, join the E-mail list by sending a message to [emailprotected] The office is located on the 5th floor of the Student Events Center, 5 Washington Place, (212) 998-4999; www.nyu.edu/programoffice.

NYU Program Board Program Board is a student-run organization dedicated to providing low-cost, quality entertainment and special events for the entire New York University community. Members are responsible for every step of the event-planning process, from booking of talent and contract negotiation to technical production and publicity. Program Board is made up of an executive board as well as the following committees: Concerts, Films, Lectures, New Music, Performing Arts, Poets and Writers, and Visual Arts. Program Board also hosts Network Event Theater™, a series of free advance screenings of big-budget films. All interested students are invited to join. For information about events, have your name put on the Program Board E-mail list by sending a request to [emailprotected] The office is located at 5 Washington Place, 5th Floor; (212) 998-4999.

148 • Student Activities/University Services • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Ticket Central Box Office The Ticket Central Box Office, (212) 998-4949, is NYU’s clearinghouse for discount tickets to a wide range of performing arts and film events on and off campus. Ticket Central is located at 283 Mercer Street in the Mercer Lounge. Join the Email list by sending a message to [emailprotected] The Web site is www.nyu.edu/programoffice/tc.html.

Information Center The advanced, multimedia NYU Information Center, Shimkin Hall, 1st Floor, is the place to go for answers to questions about the University, the Village, or New York City. The Information Center serves as a central information resource and referral service for NYU students, faculty, alumni, and staff, as well as for the general public. Staff members answer questions directly or refer inquiries to a specific office for a more complete answer. Publications available include current bulletins for University schools, application forms for special testing programs (GRE, GMAT, LSAT, DAT, MCAT, TOEFL), a variety of maps (campus, subway, bus, trolley, etc.), campus newspapers, calendars, and journals, as well as a wide variety of internal and external pamphlets and brochures detailing new academic programs, study abroad opportunities, campus activities and events (films, lectures, concerts, theatre performances), and metropolitan resources (libraries, museums, etc.).

Jerome S. Coles Sports and Recreation Center The Jerome S. Coles Sports and Recreation Center fills the recreational needs of the University’s students, faculty, staff, and alumni. The facilities accommodate a wide range of individual and group recreational activities, in addition to serving as home for the New York University intercollegiate teams. The center’s operating schedule provides every member of the University community with an opportunity to participate in a series of programs, recreational courses, free play, intramural activities, and varsity or club teams. As a result of multipurpose area functions and scheduling, a wide range of activities at varying skill levels is available to all facility users. The Jerome S. Coles Sports and Recreation Center provides the following facilities: • A roof with a 1/6-mile, three-lane running track, plus a playing surface that accommodates six tennis courts.

• A natatorium with an NCAA regulation-size swimming pool and diving tank. • Six squash courts and five handball/racquetball courts. • A large, modern weight-training room and two annexes containing Life Strength and Hammer Strength machines plus free weights, StairMasters, VersaClimbers, Lifesteps, rowing machines, and abductor/adductor machines. • Individual rooms for wrestling/martial arts, fencing, physical fitness/calisthenics, dance, and exercise prescription instruction. • Over 1,000 square feet of textured rock wall: Coles Rocks. The Coles Sports and Recreation Center is located at 181 Mercer Street (between Bleecker and West Houston Streets). The center covers 142,000 square feet and has four levels (roof, lobby, natatorium, and field house). Five hundred people can use the facility at one time, 1,900 spectators can be seated in the field house bleachers, and 230 can be seated in the natatorium bleachers. The center is barrier-free to facilitate access for those with disabilities. Lockers and recreational equipment are available to members. Reservations are necessary for squash, handball, racquetball, and tennis courts. Tickets for home intercollegiate events that require an admission fee can be secured at the center. The Coles Pro-Shop (Level N) sells attire and equipment commonly needed by center members. Use of the center is available to all students who are registered for credit-bearing courses and who hold currently valid ID cards. Students who are maintaining matriculation must pay an additional $60 per term ($45 for summer) for the use of Coles. Other members of the University community may obtain access to the center by purchasing a membership. Rules and procedures pertinent to use of the center and its programs are published annually and are available at the Membership Office.

Department of Athletics, Intramurals, and Recreation The Department of Athletics, Intramurals, and Recreation, housed in the Jerome S. Coles Sports and Recreation Center, administers the recreation, intramural, and intercollegiate athletic programs of the University. Recreational activities are designed to respond to the needs and interests of the entire University community—including students, faculty, administration, staff, alumni—and a limited

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

number of neighboring community residents. The recreation program has two major components. Instructional activities are intended to develop skills and healthful habits to be used throughout life. General recreation, informal and unstructured, is meant to provide personal enjoyment, conditioning, and relaxation. Intramural activities provide participation and growth possibilities to those members of the center whose widely differing abilities, interests, and priorities warrant more structured and somewhat more formal levels of competition than recreational participation. Call (212) 998-2025 for information and schedules. Intercollegiate athletics offer desirable opportunities for physical, confidence, and leadership development for those men and women of the student body interested in higher levels of competition. New York University is a member of and adheres to the rules and regulations of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Association, as well as a number of local and regional associations in particular sports. The University competes in NCAA Division III intercollegiate varsity basketball for men and women. The University also maintains a program of intercollegiate competition for men and women in several other sports. The men’s sports include cross-country, fencing, golf, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor track and field, outdoor track and field, volleyball, and wrestling. In addition to basketball, varsity competition is available to women in cross-country, fencing, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor track and field, outdoor track and field, and volleyball. Call (212) 9982024 for information and schedules. New York University is a member of the University Athletic Association, which includes Brandeis University, Carnegie Mellon University, Case Western Reserve University, the University of Chicago, Emory University, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Rochester, and Washington University (in St. Louis).

Chelsea Piers Special arrangements have been made for New York University students to take classes and join the sports and entertainment complex at Chelsea Piers. The complex includes an outdoor, multitiered golf driving range, batting cages, in-line skating rinks, ice-skating rinks, rock-climbing walls, a 1/4-mile indoor track, indoor sand volleyball courts, and many other facilities. Information about discounted daily admission fees, registration for Chelsea Piers courses at reduced rates, and special monthly membership fees can be obtained by calling the New York

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Student Activities/University Services • 149

University Recreation Office at (212) 998-2018 or by picking up a brochure at the Coles Membership Office.

Student Residences The Office of Housing and Residence Life, at 8 Washington Place, first floor, is responsible for housing undergraduate and graduate students in University residence halls. Each of the residence halls has mail distribution, a 24-hour-a-day reception desk and/or security guard, and laundry facilities in addition to a variety of recreational facilities. Each of the following residence halls accommodates undergraduates only unless otherwise noted. Alumni Hall, 33 Third Avenue Brittany Hall, 55 East 10th Street Broome Street Residence, 400 Broome Street Carlyle Court, 25 Union Square West Cliff Street, 15 Cliff Street (undergraduates and graduates) Coral Towers, 131 Third Avenue Paulette Goddard Hall, 79 Washington Square East Greenwich Hotel, 636 Greenwich Street Hayden Hall, 33 Washington Square West John Street, 99 John Street (graduate only) Lafayette Street Residence, 80 Lafayette Street (undergraduates and graduates) NYU at the Seaport, 200 Water Street Palladium Hall, 140 East 14th Street (undergraduates and Stern graduates) Rubin Hall, 35 Fifth Avenue Seventh Street Residence, 40 East Seventh Street Third Avenue North Residence Hall, 75 Third Avenue Twenty-sixth Street Residence, 334 East 26th Street (undergraduates and graduates) University Court, 334 East 25th Street University Hall, 110 East 14th Street Washington Square Village, 4 Washington Square Village (graduates only) Weinstein Center for Student Living, 5 University Place For more information about NYU housing, call (212) 998-4600.

Off-Campus Housing Listings NYU’s Off-Campus Housing Office, under the auspices of the Department of Housing and Residence Life, assists members of the NYU community in their search for information about non-University housing options. The office is open only to current and newly admitted NYU students. Located at 4 Washington Square Village on the corner of Mercer and Bleecker Streets, the office is open Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; (212) 998-4620; Web site: www.nyu.edu/housing/offcampus.

NYU Campus Dining Services Keeping up with the ever-changing food trends, NYU Campus Dining has everything from traditional American cuisine, ethnic dishes, and national brands like Burger King® and Pizza Hut Express®. Also available are low-fat, vegan, and vegetarian dining options at 13 different dining sites (listed below), including a restaurant, food court, outdoor café, five dining rooms, and two late-night snack bars, which make eating on campus convenient for all. Students can choose from 11 distinctive meal plans. On-campus and off-campus residents have the freedom to use their NYUCard for meals, beverages, and snacks. For more information on dining locations and hours of service, contact NYU Campus Dining Services, (212) 995-3030. Faye’s Café, 38 East Eighth Street Founders Café, 50 West Fourth Street (at the NYU Information Center) Hayden Dining Room, 33 Washington Square West The Palladium, 140 East 14th Street Rubin Dining Room, 35 Fifth Avenue (at 10th Street) Third North Courtyard Café, 75 Third Avenue (at 12th Street) University Hall Atrium Dining Room and Java City®, 110 East 14th Street The Violet Café, 45 West Fourth Street Weinstein Dining Room, Weinstein Food Court, Java City®, and Kosher Eatery (with meat and dairy options), 5 University Place

University Health Center The mission of the New York University Health Center (UHC) is to provide and promote highquality, accessible, and cost-effective treatment, prevention, and education in support of the University’s gols and in response to the needs and

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

concerns of its students. To this end, a comprehensive range of services is offered in a facility with state-of-the-art equipment and highly qualified health care professionals. Health care at UHC is available to all registered NYU students. Students covered under an NYU insurance plan must first seek treatment at the UHC, except in emergencies. Students covered under private health insurance may telephone Patient Accounts at (212) 443-1010 to determine if the UHC has a billing relationship with its insurance company. A scheduled appointment is the preferred method for students to receive services at UHC. Typically, a health care provider will be available to see you in Primary Care Services based on appointment availability and your scheduling needs. Patients who cannot wait for an appointment due to the nature of their illness or injury will receive assistance through Urgent Care Services. UHC also offers a wide range of additional services, including the following specialty services: allergy and immunization, dermatology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, gynecology/ women’s health, men’s health, minor surgery, neurology, occupational medicine, ophthalmology, orthopedics, otolaryngology (ear, nose, and throat), performing arts medicine, podiatry, pulmonology, sports medicine, and travel medicine. Appointments for specialty services may be made after a medically warranted referral from a UHC health care provider. Additional programs and services include Center for Health Promotion; Office of Drug and Alcohol Education; Office of Sexual Assault Prevention, Education, and Support; HIV services; laboratory; nutrition services; physical and occupational therapy; optometry; pharmacy; and radiology. The general hours of operation during the academic year (September through May) are Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. During the summer (June through August), the hours are MondayThursday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. UHC is closed during certain University holidays. For hours of individual departments and holiday schedules, please call UHC at (212) 443-1000. The UHC is located at 726 Broadway on the 3rd and 4th Floors. For more information, please call, E-mail, or visit the UHC Web site ([212] 443-1000; [emailprotected]; www.nyu.edu/pages/health).

150 • Student Activities/University Services • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

After-Hours Care In case of a life- or limb-threatening emergency, please dial 911. For other health emergencies, or when UHC is closed, please call Protection Services at (212) 998-2222. You will be connected with Tisch Hospital’s emergency room, where a physician will provide advice over the telephone and determine if you need to come to the emergency room or can wait to see a health care provider at the UHC the following day.

Insurance New York University students in degree-granting programs are required to maintain health insurance. Most students are automatically enrolled in an optional NYU-sponsored student health insurance plan as part of the University’s registration process. The plan in which students are enrolled automatically varies according to school, credit load, and visa status. For more specific information, please refer to the Student Health Insurance Handbook, E-mail [emailprotected], or call the Student Health Insurance Services Office at (212) 443-1020. NYU sponsors three student health insurance plans: the Basic Plan, the Comprehensive Plan, and the UHC Only Plan. Students enrolled in the NYU-sponsored student health insurance program may switch from the Basic Plan to the Comprehensive Plan, or vice versa. Students maintaining their own health insurance can supplement their coverage by enrolling in the UHC Only Plan, or they can waive any of the optional student health insurance plans (and corresponding charge) entirely. Also, students who otherwise are eligible for the program but who do not meet the credit-load requirement for automatic enrollment may enroll in any NYU-sponsored student health insurance plan voluntarily. To select, change, or waive coverage, students must submit a completed Student Health Insurance Selection/Waiver Form to the Student Health Insurance Services Office before the applicable enrollment/waiver deadline. Doing so will ensure that students are enrolled in the plan of their choice. Except for medical emergencies and when living outside the borough of Manhattan, students insured under any NYU-sponsored student health insurance plan are required to first seek treatment and be evaluated at the University Health Center (UHC) for any sickness or injury. A medical emergency refers to an acute illness or injury that is life- or limb-threatening or may perma-

nently affect the quality of life. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the plan administrator, Chickering Claims Administrators, Inc., (800) 466-4148, of any emergency or elective hospital admission. Detailed information about the NYU-sponsored student health insurance plans is included in the Student Health Insurance Handbook. To obtain a copy of the booklet and/or the Student Health Insurance Selection/Waiver Form, please visit or call the Student Health Insurance Services Office at (212) 443-1020, located at the UHC, 726 Broadway, 3rd Floor. You may also contact the office via E-mail at [emailprotected]

Résumé and Cover Letter: Learn how to write and construct an effective résumé and cover letter that best reflect your qualifications. Topics include format, content, and layout. Interviewing Skills: Topics include interview behavior, proper attire, and responding to difficult questions. Perfect your interviewing style through role plays.

University Counseling Service

Dining for Success: Mastering the Lunch and Dinner Interview: A comprehensive program for juniors and seniors, designed to train students on dining etiquette and appropriate professional behavior through a simulated business lunch/dinner experience (including a threecourse meal). Interactions that occur during mixers and mealtime interviews and when dining with and entertaining clients are addressed.

726 Broadway, Suite 471 Monday-Thursday, 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m.; Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Telephone: (212) 998-4780 Web: www.nyu.edu/counseling E-mail: [emailprotected]

Job Networking Skills: Learn how to develop your networking skills. Topics include improving interpersonal communication, identifying potential contacts, informational interviewing, getting past “the screen,” and utilizing and maintaining your network.

University Counseling Service (UCS) offers NYU students short-term individual counseling, group counseling, walk-in hours, referrals, workshops, and emergency services.

Job Search Techniques: Acquire new techniques for identifying job openings, making contacts, and implementing appropriate follow-up strategies. Use the Internet to assist you with all phases of your job search, including finding actual job listings, researching organizations, and networking.

NYU Office of Career Services The NYU Office of Career Services (main office) is located at 719 Broadway, 3rd Floor; telephone: (212) 998-4730; fax: (212) 995-3827; Web site: www.nyu.edu/careerservices. Office hours are Monday, Tuesday, and Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m.- 7 p.m. After registering with the office, all NYU degree candidates and alumni (fees apply for alumni) can schedule an appointment with a career counselor to discuss strategies for determining their career and job-search goals. The counselor and student work together to assess interests and skills, identify career options, prepare a résumé and cover letter, and address any career-related concerns. Students are encouraged to begin utilizing the full range of services as early as possible. Some of the available programs include: SEMINAR SERIES Planning Your Career: Learn to identify marketable skills, interests, and values that are important in determining the career direction that is best for you. Also, learn how to develop an individualized plan for effective career decision making.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

On-Campus Recruitment Orientation: Learn how to make the most of the On-Campus Recruitment Program and manage NYU InterviewNet. Important recruitment dates, numerous ways to obtain interviews, and additional employment services are also discussed. Careers in Focus for Liberal Arts Students: This orientation provides an overview of the services and programs that are specifically geared for liberal arts students. A step-by-step “4-Year Action Plan” is provided to assist in your career planning and in utilizing career services throughout your college years. Job Search Strategies for International Students: Discuss effective interviewing, networking, and job-hunting techniques. Examine cultural values of American employers. Work Abroad Orientation: Provides an overview of the work abroad resources available at the Office of Career Services. Discover the types of opportunities that are available and what the challenges are in finding a short-term position abroad.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Student Activities/University Services • 151

CAREER PROGRAMS Mentor Program: Successful professionals in a variety of fields serve as mentors to give students an inside look at various occupations. Students speak with mentors by telephone or in person and in some cases are able to spend a “day on the job” with a professional in their field of interest.

Many students also secure internships through the résumé fax referral service and special internship programs. Numerous on-campus jobs are funded by the Federal Work-Study Program and provide an excellent opportunity to work at and get “connected” to NYU.

Career Week: Held in October, this annual program features presentations by professionals and special guest speakers on a variety of career-related issues. Students have opportunities to gather in-depth career information and ask questions.

The Writing Center, 269 Mercer Street, Room 230, is staffed by trained graduate student tutors who will work with you on any kind of writing problem you may have. They will help you find a topic, get you started on a writing project, find just the right way to say what you want to say, help you revise what you have already written, and even help with the final editing. The tutors will work with you on a one-to-one basis, providing feedback, suggestions, information, advice, and encouragement. Any student currently enrolled at NYU is eligible to use the Writing Center. For information, call (212) 998-8866.

Career Fairs: Each year several fairs are held off-site to target nonprofit, private sector, fulltime, part-time, and internship opportunities for NYU students. Representatives from major companies and nonprofit agencies visit NYU to meet with students to discuss career opportunities within their organizations.

Writing Assistance

Career Assessment Tools: The Strong Interest Inventory and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator are available to assist students in learning about their interests, preferences, and styles. (Fee and follow-up appointment required.)

Fraternities and Sororities

EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE NYU CareerNet: This on-line database allows students to search for full-time, part-time, and internship positions. After registering with the Office of Career Services, NYU alumni (fee required) and students with a valid NYU ID have access to job listings 24 hours a day via the Web site.

Religious Groups

Many students also secure internships through the résumé-faxing service and special internship programs. On-Campus Recruitment. Recruiters from about 700 major organizations interview graduating students at the Main Office for full-time employment after graduation. Résumé Faxing: Graduating students and alumni seeking full-time positions and current students seeking internships are encouraged to submit résumés to be faxed to employers with immediate employment openings. STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND INTERNSHIP CENTER The Student Employment and Internship Center, located at 5 Washington Place, 2nd Floor (telephone: [212] 998-4757, fax: [212] 995-4197), is open Monday, Tuesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. It assists students in securing internships and part-time jobs both on and off campus. Internship, part-time, and summer job listings are available through NYU CareerNet.

There are 30 fraternities and sororities recognized by the University. Information may be obtained at the Office of Student Activities, 244 Greene Street; (212) 998-4710.

The Catholic Center. The Catholic Center offers daily and Sunday Mass and a variety of religious, educational, social service, and social activities for both undergraduate and graduate students. Center facilities include Holy Trinity Chapel and the Newman Catholic Students Room. The center is open every weekday, and chaplains are available for consultation and counseling. The office is located in the Thompson Building at 238 Thompson Street, 2nd Floor, between West Third and West Fourth Streets. For further information, call (212) 674-7236 or (212) 998-1065. The Edgar M. Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life. Situated at 7 East 10th Street, the Bronfman Center is the home of Jewish student life on campus. It is a five-floor town house with lounges, conference rooms, study areas, and computer and recreational areas. The center serves as a gathering place where students and faculty can study, worship, socialize, and engage in discussion of issues relating to Jewish history, welfare, culture, and community. Activities and programs include innovative, informal classes; film series; exciting speakers; weekly Shabbat services and dinner; and cultural and social events. For more information, call (212) 998-4114.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Protestant Campus Ministries. Located at 238 Thompson Street, (212) 998-4711, the Protestant Campus Ministries have a part-time chaplain available for counseling. Other Religious Organizations. There are many other religious organizations at NYU. For further information, check at the Office of Student Activities, 244 Greene Street.

Center for Music Performance There’s a wealth of musical activity at New York University, and the Center for Music Performance (CMP) is key to staying informed, involved, enlightened, and entertained. The CMP promotes all musical events on campus through the publication of its monthly performance calendar, Square Notes. This free musical listing service provides dates, times, and locations for dozens of outstanding musical events that are available to students. The CMP also acts as a catalyst to create new musical happenings and opportunities. It presents special events, including a weekly series of free jazz concerts called Jazz Tuesdays and the All-University Holiday Sing, the University’s musical kickoff to the holiday season. Each semester the CMP produces the All-University Artist-inResidence Series, an ongoing program that brings musical artists from around the world to interact with the University community via workshops, lectures, master classes, and concerts. The CMP serves as a liaison between individuals and the various musical organizations at NYU. There are myriad performance opportunities available enabling students of all ability levels to get involved. Large ensembles that are administered through the CMP include the NYU Orchestras, Concert Band, and NYU Pipes and Drums. Student music clubs abound, spanning a wide array of musical pursuits, including vocal performance, composition, and music business. The academic music departments at the University (within The Steinhardt School of Education and the Faculty of Arts and Science) offer additional performance opportunities such as jazz ensembles; choral ensembles; early music ensembles; ethnomusical ensembles; brass, woodwind, and percussion ensembles; and much more. No matter what your taste or musical ambition, the CMP is the resource that will point you in the right direction. The CMP invites students to join music lovers from across the University community to explore the wide range of offerings that make music an intrinsic part of the NYU experience. Students with any questions or who wish to be added to the Square Notes mailing list should call the Center for Music Performance at (212) 992-6874.

152 • Student Activities/University Services • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Other NYU Performing Organizations Other performing organizations at the University include the NYU Washington Square Repertory Dance Company, (212) 998-5865; NYU Kaleidoscope Dancers for Children, (212) 9985411; NYU Playwrights; and NYU Summer Musical Theatre Workshop.

The NYU Bookstores The New York University Main Bookstore, located at 18 Washington Place, stocks required and recommended course books, both new and used; a complete selection of hardcover and paperback general books; current best-sellers; children’s books and clothing; study aids; and NYU sportswear, stationery, and gifts. Registered students can get a printout of required and recommended textbooks at the store on the text level. The main telephone number is (212) 998-4667. Regular store hours are 10 a.m. to 7:15 p.m., Monday-Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday and Saturday. Store hours are extended beginning one week prior to the start of classes and continuing through the first two weeks of classes. Call the store or check the Web site for more information. Book inquiry systems (TextTone: [212] 443-4000 and the Web site: www.bookc.nyu.edu) are available two weeks prior to the start of a new semester. Registered students, using a Touch-Tone telephone or the Internet, can inquire about, get a listing of, and purchase optional and required course books 24 hours a day with a major credit card. Orders will be shipped via UPS ground within two business days. COMPUTER STORE The Computer Store, located at 242 Greene Street, (212) 998-4672, or [emailprotected], offers educationally priced hardware and software. Books, CDs, film supplies, accessories, small electronics, repair services, and computing supplies are also available. At the start of each semester, students can take advantage of a no-interest computer loan for up to $3,000 with deposit, with the deferred-interest computer purchase program. PROFESSIONAL BOOKSTORE The Professional Bookstore, located at 530 La Guardia Place, (212) 998-4680, or [emailprotected] nyu.edu, serves the Leonard N. Stern School of Business (Graduate Division), the School of Law, and the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service with required and recommended course books. Also available are sportswear, featuring school insignia; stationery; study guides; and reference books.

Forms of payment include MasterCard, Visa, American Express, Discover, and NYUCard Campus Cash.

Campus Safety The safety of its students is of the utmost concern to New York University. The University has a comprehensive safety program that includes training, protection, and education. As part of the overall plan, the NYU Protection and Transportation Services Department provides a force of over 220 uniformed security guards who are on duty at campus facilities and patrol 24 hours a day by foot, by bicycles, and vehicles. Residence halls have 24-hour security or doormen. The trolley and escort van service provides safe transport to residence hall locations and off-campus University facilities. In accordance with federal regulations, New York University annually publishes its Campus Security Report. A copy of this report is available by contacting the Office of Student Life, 240 Greene Street, New York, NY 10003-6675; (212) 998-4953. This report includes campus crime statistics for the previous three years and also contains institutional policies concerning campus security and crime prevention, alcohol and drug abuse, and sexual harassment.

Computer Services and Internet Resources INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES (ITS) www.nyu.edu/its Client Services Center: 10 Astor Place, 4th Floor Telephone HelpLine: (212) 998-3333 8 a.m.-12 midnight, Monday-Friday 12 noon-12 midnight, Saturday and Sunday Walk-In Hours: 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday-Friday Information Technology Services (ITS) is NYU’s central organization for technology-based services for University students, faculty, and staff. ITS provides computer services, Internet access and software, four on-campus student computer labs, two ITS-affiliated student computer labs, and classes, assistance, and a variety of additional resources that will help you with your course work and research projects. Our services include the following: E-MAIL AND INTERNET www.nyu.edu/its/students/internet ITS provides NYUHome service, giving students a customizable portal to many Web-based services and tools: E-mail, Albert, Web forums, NYU

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Blackboard, classes, your own personal Web page, research tools, library information, network news, and other Internet services. NYU students in degree or diploma programs and visiting and special students in NYU degree program courses are eligible for these accounts and the many services available to account holders. Visit www.nyu.edu/ its/students/internet to learn more. COMPUTER LABS AND INSTRUCTIONAL FACILITIES www.nyu.edu/its/labs ITS operates four modern computer labs, offering high-end Macintosh and Windows systems, along with laser printers, DVD drives and related equipment, and a wide variety of up-to-date software. High-speed connections to World Wide Web and Internet resources can be made from the labs’ computers. The ITS labs are located in the Education Building (second floor), Tisch Hall (lower concourse, room LC-8), 14 Washington Place (lower level), and the Third Avenue North Residence Hall (level C-3). There are also two ITSaffiliated computer labs on campus, the CAS Learning Center Lab (Weinstein Center, first floor) and the Bronfman Center for Jewish Studies (7 East 10th Street). Visit www.nyu.edu/its/labs for lab hours and other lab information. There is no charge for use of the ITS labs. They are open to all NYU students in degree or diploma programs and to NYU faculty and staff. Access to additional computing resources is available to qualified students and faculty through specialized ITS computer accounts. To learn more about these accounts, please contact the ITS Client Services Center at (212) 998-3333, visit www.nyu.edu/its/ accounts, or send E-mail to [emailprotected] nyu.edu. Account Request Forms are available at www.nyu.edu/its/accounts or at the ITS Client Services Center, 10 Astor Place, 4th Floor. CONNECTING TO NYU-NET www.nyu.edu/its/howto/connect/ NYU’s campuswide data network, NYU-NET, links your personal computer—whether in your home, dorm room, or off-campus workplace—to your NYUHome account, allowing access to the other Internet services mentioned above. Telephone and modem (“dial-in”) connections can be made to NYU-NET using the University’s DIAL (Direct Internet Access Link) service. NYU ResNet provides direct Ethernet connections to NYU student residents from rooms in many NYU residence halls. For information about in-room connections, visit www.nyu.edu/resnet. You can connect to the Internet on your own laptop by plugging into one of the network ports located in designated laptop areas in Bobst Library.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Student Activities/University Services • 153

To connect through these ports, you must have activated your NYUHome account and have an active Bobst Roaming Account. For more information about roaming accounts, contact the ITS Client Services Center at (212) 998-3333 or visit www.nyu.edu/its/roaming. The Electronic Resources Center (Bobst Library, B-Level) also loans laptops to students at no charge for use in designated locations throughout the library.

texts, training, and consulting. Visit www.nyu.edu/its/humanities for more information.

There are also over 100 NYUHome stations installed around campus for public use. They are available at Bobst Library, Mercer Lounge, the Study Center, and other locations, and they provide eligible students with access to NYUHome, E-mail, and other Internet resources. Visit home.nyu.edu/homestations for a complete list of locations.

• Expert consultation in the use of software for social science research is provided by the ITS Social Sciences, Statistics, and Mapping Group. High-end workstations and a variety of social sciences software are available for student use. Visit www.nyu.edu/its/socsci for more information.

IN-ROOM TELEPHONE SERVICE www.nyu.edu/its/students/telephone (212) 443-1221 for Residence Hall Telephone Service Line ITS Telecommunications Services provides telephone services to students housed in many NYU residence halls, including easy-to-use voice mail and long-distance service. Residence halls where telephone service is not provided by ITS Telecommunications have services provided by NYU service partners. CLASSES www.nyu.edu/its/classes Each semester, ITS and Bobst Library offer programs of short classes and talks on the use of computers, Internet, and library resources to all eligible NYU students. For a class schedule, visit www.nyu.edu/its/classes or calendar.nyu.edu. SPECIAL RESOURCES ITS Academic Computing Services offers discipline-specific services in the arts, humanities, sciences, and social sciences to advanced students. • The Arts Technology Group at the Multimedia Lab at 35 West Fourth Street, 2nd floor, supports NYU students in the use of advanced digital tools, with a focus on newly emerging technologies including digital video, advanced imaging, and planning and consulting services. Visit www.nyu.edu/its/atg for more information. • The Humanities Computing Group promotes and supports computer resources available for humanities teaching and research, including a library of specialist software and electronic

• ITS has a variety of special resources for students in the sciences such as the Scientific Visualization Laboratory, access to supercomputing systems, and popular mathematical software. Visit www.nyu.edu/its/science for more details.

SOFTWARE FOR HOME AND OFFICE USE www.nyu.edu/its/software or the NYU-NET CD Look to ITS for selected Internet software and Norton AntiVirus software that can help you make the most of your home or office connection to NYU-NET and protect your computer from viruses and worms. Pick up ITS’s yearly NYU-NET CD at any ITS computer lab or at the ITS Client Services Center, 10 Astor Place, 4th floor, or visit www.nyu.edu/its/software to download the available software directly to your PC or Macintosh. Authentication is required for Norton AntiVirus software downloads. HELP www.nyu.edu/its/helpdesk or home.nyu.edu/help Telephone support is provided by the ITS Client Services Center, (212) 998-3333, from 8 a.m. until 12 midnight, Monday through Friday, and from 12 noon until 12 midnight, Saturday and Sunday. On-line support, including an extensive FAQ section, is available at www.nyu.edu/its/ helpdesk and at home.nyu.edu/help. In-person help is available at any of the four ITS computer labs (see www.nyu.edu/its/labs for current schedule) and at the ITS Client Services Center, 10 Astor Place, 4th floor, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Appointments are recommended for laptop configuration: www.nyu.edu/its/helpdesk. FURTHER INFORMATION Additional information can be obtained by visiting www.nyu.edu/its and home.nyu.edu/help or by calling (212) 998-3333. The Computer Services and Internet Resources brochure, available at any of the ITS labs or at the NYU Information Center, contains more detailed

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

information. The NYU Libraries and ITS Student Guide, updated each fall and spring semester, also contains detailed information and is available at the ITS labs, the NYU Libraries, the NYU Information Center, and at the ITS Client Services Center.

The Office for University Development and Alumni Relations The Office for University Development and Alumni Relations for The Steinhardt School of Education of New York University enables graduates to maintain an active and enduring relationship with their school and classmates. The Alumni Association is the advisory body of The Steinhardt School of Education Alumni Association. This group of active Steinhardt School of Education graduates works directly with the Office for University Development and Alumni Relations and is represented on the University-Wide Alumni Association. The Office for University Development and Alumni Relations, in conjunction with the Alumni Association, annually sponsors various social activities, conferences, and cultural events. Events are also cosponsored with the Dean’s Office and the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs. Graduates are encouraged to attend and participate in student recitals, gallery openings, and theatre productions. There are also special programs for recent graduates. Alumni can find outlets for continued professional development at their alma mater. Conferences offered by the Center for Career Advancement are held throughout the year and are often offered to alumni at a discounted rate. Alumni are also invited to participate in workshops, seminars, and lectures, which take place schoolwide and within departments. In addition, educational lectures are offered throughout the University. Other events during the year include Dean’s Day, The Steinhardt School of Education Commencement activities, and regional receptions. For further information, please consult the Office of Alumni Relations, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, 25 West Fourth Street, Room 520, New York, NY 10012-1119; (212) 998-6929.

The Dean’s Annual Fund The mission of The Steinhardt School of Education is to provide high-quality education to current students in order to foster well-trained

154 • Student Activities/University Services • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

and intelligent professionals. The involvement of alumni is necessary in order for the school to be true to its mission. The Dean’s Annual Fund provides vital unrestricted dollars to keep the school moving forward. Annual Fund support directly serves the school in many ways. It provides scholarship support to students in need. It provides the ability to keep equipment and facilities up-to-date so that students enter their fields with proper skills and expertise. It also provides assistance for students in the form of career development, counseling, and placement services. Annual fund contributions can be made by contacting the Office of Alumni Relations, The

Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, 25 West Fourth Street, Room 520, New York, NY 10012-1119; (212) 998-6929.

New York University Alumni Activities The involvement of alumni in University activities is crucial to the health and strength of New York University. Alumni provide important ties between the past and the present and help the University build for the future. The New York University Office for University Development and Alumni Relations works with the dean of each school and college to help serve alumni needs and encourage their involvement and support.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Contributing alumni receive the NYU Alumni Card, which is a passport to many Universitywide alumni services and benefits, including limited access to Bobst Library and Coles Sports Center, entrance to the NYU Torch Club, educational travel programs, lifetime E-mail forwarding, and membership in VioletNet, an on-line community exclusively for NYU graduates. Alumni are also invited to participate in numerous University events, both on campus and across the country. For further information, please contact the Office of Alumni Relations, New York University, 25 West Fourth Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10012-1119; (212) 998-6929.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Community Service • 155

Community Service

Every year, hundreds of NYU students devote their time and energy to community service. In addition to the satisfaction they receive in helping their neighbors, they also gain valuable work experience. Through NYU’s Community Service Center, students volunteer with dozens of not-forprofit organizations throughout New York City. Some begin their volunteer activities even before classes begin in the fall. They are part of NYU’s OutReach program. Divided into teams, students work with nine different organizations. They help out in soup kitchens, visit elderly people with Alzheimer’s disease, and deliver meals to homebound AIDS patients. Over 125 undergraduates are members of the President’s C-Team, donating their time to six preschool and after-school programs in the neighborhood. They help older children with

their homework, play with the little ones, and give all the children the extra attention they need.

college life, and as tutors to selected high school students taking NYU courses in the College Preview program.

CHANCE (Concern and Help for the Advancement of Needy Children through Education) is a national nonprofit organization designed to help inner-city high school students by giving them special tutoring and the opportunity to socialize with college students. Two nights a week, high school students come to NYU for an English lesson, an optional SAT preparation class, and dinner donated by a local restaurant. Each teenager is assigned an NYU big brother or sister who also spends time with them apart from their weekly tutoring session.

NYU students are involved in many other activities on and off campus. They collect canned goods, conduct toy drives, and distribute bag lunches to the homeless. They work in dropout prevention programs that encourage high school students to stay in school. They renovate houses and make them livable again. Whether their involvement is with the sick, the poor, or those who simply need a helping hand, student volunteers give of themselves freely. And they all agree that they get back so much more than they give.

NYU students also work as College Friends in a program called College Connection, which introduces local junior high school students to

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Admission • 157

Admission

General Standards Web: www.nyu.edu/ugadmissions Admission to The Steinhardt School of Education is selective. Candidates are accepted on the basis of predicted success in the specific programs and divisions in which they are interested. If the applicant meets formal course requirements, his or her capacity for successful undergraduate work is measured through careful consideration of secondary school records; the essay; recommendations from guidance counselors, teachers, and others; and scores on standardized tests. An audition, interview, or creative portfolio is required for certain programs. New York University actively seeks students who are varied in interests, talents, and goals, as well as in social and economic backgrounds. Particular attention is paid to the degree that candidates have made effective use of

the opportunities available to them, however great or limited those opportunities may have been.

Recommended High School Preparation

Evidence of character and maturity are regarded as essential in potential students who hope to benefit fully from the unique offerings of the University and its urban environment. Participation in meaningful school and community activities is an important factor.

The quality of an applicant’s secondary school record is more important than a prescribed pattern of courses. Sound preparation should include four years of English, with heavy emphasis on writing; three years of mathematics; two to three years of science; three to four years of social studies; and two to three years of foreign language. The remainder of the program may include further work in the above subjects or elective work in other subjects, including music and art. Special consideration is given to honors or advanced placement courses. It is strongly recommended that all applicants take mathematics and language courses in the senior year of high school.

Applicants for admission who are uncertain which specific school or college of the University offers the program they desire may obtain information and guidance through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, New York University, 22 Washington Square North, New York, NY 10011-9191; telephone (212) 998-4500; www.nyu.edu/ugadmissions. Applicants who are neither U.S. citizens nor permanent residents of the U.S. should see page 160.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Although the foregoing pattern is preferred for admission of entering freshmen, an applicant

158 • Admission • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

may be considered in exceptional cases on the basis of the General Educational Development (GED) test. The SAT I of the College Entrance Examination Board or an NYU-administered examination may be required for students applying on the basis of the GED test. A high school transcript may also be required.

The Admissions Process All candidates for undergraduate admission to the University should send the following to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, New York University, 22 Washington Square North, New York, NY 10011-9191: a. Undergraduate Application for Admission (For an on-line application for admission, visit the NYU Web site at www.nyu/ugadmissions.) b. Undergraduate Statistical Form

process, or the academic programs are invited to attend an information session conducted by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. Although interviews are generally not available, a visit to the campus is strongly recommended. Applicants will be notified if an interview is requested by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions or the individual department. Tours of the campus and admissions information sessions are conducted several times daily, Monday through Friday, except during University holidays. To make an appointment for a tour, an information session, or a class visitation, call the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at (212) 998-4524. It is suggested that arrangements be made several weeks prior to visiting the campus. Information is also available on the NYU Web site: www.nyu.edu/ugadmissions.

c. Nonreturnable $55.00 application fee d. Official high school and/or college records

NYU Guest Accommodations

e. All required testing should be completed and official results forwarded.

Prospective students and their families visiting New York are invited to stay in Club Quarters, a private hotel convenient to the University. Located in a newly renovated turn-of-the-century building in New York’s historic Financial District, the hotel offers concierge services, a health club, and room service, among other amenities. If space is available, weekend University guests may also stay at the midtown Club Quarters, located in a landmark building that is close to shopping, Broadway theatres, and Rockefeller Center. For information and reservations, call (212) 443-4700.

All candidates are urged to complete and file the applications as soon as possible, especially those who are seeking financial aid and/or housing (see below for application filing deadlines). No admission decision will be made without complete information. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions reserves the right to substitute or waive particular admissions requirements at the discretion of the Admissions Committee. Applications submitted after the filing deadline will be considered in the order received as long as space is available. Freshman candidates for September admission are notified approximately April 1. Early Decision candidates are notified beginning in mid-December. Transfer candidates for the spring term are notified on a rolling basis, usually within a month after their applications are received, but not before November 15 of the preceding year.

Campus Visits All prospective students and their parents are invited to visit New York University campus. Opportunities to tour the University, to meet students and faculty, and to attend classes are available to interested students. Both high school and college students wishing to discuss the choice of a college, the transfer

seeking January admission should take them during the preceding May or July. Transfer students should submit SAT, SAT I, or ACT scores. The school may require additional testing at the University for transfer applicants and for applicants with interrupted education. Detailed information on the SATs may be obtained from the College Board, P.O. Box 6200, Princeton, NJ. 08541-6200; (800) 728-7267; www.collegeboard.com. Detailed information on the ACT may be obtained from the American College Test, P.O. Box 414, Iowa City, IA 522430414; (319) 337-1000; www.act.org.

Admission Application Filing Deadlines For entrance in September, applications for admission, including all required supporting credentials, should be received by January 15 for freshman candidates, by April 1 for transfer applicants, and by November 15 for Early Decision applicants. For entrance in January (transfer applicants only), applications for admission, including all required supporting credentials, must be received by November 1. For entrance in the summer sessions (transfer applicants only), applications should be received by April 1. Applications for admission received after these dates will be considered only if space remains in the program desired. The application for admission will contain the most current information regarding enrollment.

Required Testing Freshman applicants must take the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT I) or the American College Test (ACT) and have official scores sent directly from the testing service to the University. We recommend that freshman applicants also submit scores from three SAT II Subject Tests, preferably from the Writing Examination and any other two tests. The test booklets will provide a space in which applicants who want their scores sent to New York University may enter the appropriate code number. For SAT I and SAT II, the University’s code number is 2562. For ACT, the code number is 2838. Arrangements to take these examinations should be made during the senior year in high school and one month prior to the examination date. Applicants seeking September admission are recommended to take the SAT I (SAT II recommended) or ACT examinations during the preceding October, November, or December. Those

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Financial Aid Application After the admission decision is made and the appropriate financial aid applications are received by the Office of Financial Aid, a request for financial aid is considered. All students applying for any federal financial aid must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is the only application students must complete to be considered for all federal financial aid, including Pell Grants, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, Stafford Student Loans (including the unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan), Perkins Loans, Federal Work-Study, and other federal financial aid programs. Students will not be charged a fee when filing this form.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Admission • 159

By listing NYU as a recipient of the information, students can also use the FAFSA to apply for financial aid at NYU. The University’s code number is 002785. New York State residents will also be required to complete a separate application for the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) (mailed to the student automatically), and students from other states may have to complete separate applications for their state programs if their state grants can be used at New York University.

Early Decision Plan for High School Seniors Entering freshmen with clearly acceptable high school records and SAT I (SAT II recommended) or ACT test scores may be considered under the Early Decision Plan. Under this plan, students should submit their applications and all supporting credentials, including their junior year SAT I (SAT II recommended) or ACT results, no later than November 15. Applicants for certain programs may be required to submit creative materials or to audition for the performance areas. In addition, each applicant must complete on the application a signed statement agreeing that he or she will withdraw any applications submitted to other colleges if accepted by New York University. Action on these applications will be taken by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions beginning in mid-December. Early decision candidates who are also applicants for financial aid must submit the NYU Early Decision Financial Aid Application by November 15, so that the University will be able to provide a financial aid estimate by the early decision notification date. Early Decision applicants must also file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by February 15.

Transfer Applicants A student may be admitted by transfer from another college in September, January, or May. (See The Admissions Process, page 158.) Some programs admit students only for the fall semester. Please contact the appropriate department. Except when specifically noted, the general procedures described for entering freshmen apply to all applicants seeking to transfer from other twoyear or four-year regionally accredited institutions. Transfer applicants must submit official credentials from all institutions attended, including secondary school records, and transcripts from all colleges attended, whether or not the student completed any courses there. An audition, interview, or creative portfolio is required for certain programs. If available, SAT, SAT I, or ACT scores should be submitted. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions and/or specific

departments may require additional testing at the University for transfer students or for those with interrupted education. TRANSFER CREDIT If a transfer applicant is admitted to New York University, his or her records are examined carefully to determine how much, if any, transfer credit will be granted. Credits over 10 years old are reviewed by the dean’s office prior to matriculation. In granting transfer credit, the following are considered: the content, complexity, and grading standards of courses taken elsewhere; individual grades and averages attained by the applicant; and the suitability of courses taken elsewhere for the program of study chosen here. Grades of C or better (no credit is awarded for grades of C-) must have been earned in transfer courses in order to be applied toward degree requirements. In those institutions where a grade of C is the lowest passing grade, then one full grade above the lowest passing mark, a grade of B, may be considered transferable. The maximum number of transfer credits granted to the two-year college transfer student shall not exceed the minimum number of credits required for his or her associate’s degree; in any case, this shall not exceed 72 credits. Transfer students from four-year colleges can receive approximately 96 credits. (The Steinhardt School of Education’s residency requirement is 32 credits.) The lowest passing grade from other institutions will not be considered for transfer credit. Each program of study reserves the right to determine the grade level of courses acceptable for transfer to an area of specialization. A tentative statement of transfer credit is provided to each student upon notification of admission to the school. The applicant will be notified on the tentative transfer statement if additional transcripts are required. A final statement of transfer credit is provided during the student’s first semester of matriculation. Requests for reevaluation of transfer credit must be made within the semester during which the final statement of transfer credit is received by application to the undergraduate evaluator in the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs. Thereafter, a student’s transfer credits may be changed only with the written permission of the associate dean for student services and public affairs. TRANSFER RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT Transfer students must fulfill the residence requirement for the degree (see page 176).

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Community College Transfer Opportunity Program The Steinhardt School of Education especially encourages students from community colleges to complete their baccalaureate degrees in teacher education, health, nursing, communications, and the arts. Through the Community College Transfer Opportunity Program, the school has signed transfer agreements with 11 community colleges in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. These agreements enable associate’s degree students from these colleges to transfer at least 60 credits toward the baccalaureate degree in a related field of study at The Steinhardt School of Education. Transfer agreements also exist for R.N. students from over 30 regional community colleges and hospital-based nursing programs. Applicants must meet the school’s admission requirements. Special scholarships are available to students from these selected community colleges. For more information, contact Director, Community College Transfer Opportunity Program, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, 82 Washington Square East, New York, NY 100036680; telephone (212) 998-5139; Web site: www.nyu.edu/cctop.

Transfer Applicants Within the University Students who wish to transfer from one school to another within the University must file an Internal Transfer Application in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 22 Washington Square North, prior to the application deadline.

Special Students (Visiting) All special students must meet the academic standards of the school. Undergraduate students who wish to enroll in graduate courses are restricted as follows: 1000-level courses are open to juniors and seniors; 2000-level courses are open to seniors only with special permission. Special students are not eligible for financial aid or University housing. Undergraduate matriculated students who are currently attending other regionally accredited four-year colleges and maintaining good standing, both academic and disciplinary, may be admitted on certification from their own schools. Such students must be eligible to receive degree credit at their own schools for the courses taken at the University. Such students may be permitted to take a maximum of 32 credits in The Steinhardt School of Education. The Special Student Application form for undergraduate students may be obtained from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 22 Washington Square North, New York, NY 10011-9191, or on-

160 • Admission • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

line at www.nyu.edu/ugadmissions. A $25.00 application fee is required.

Applicants with Foreign Credentials Applicants to New York University who are neither United States citizens nor permanent residents of the United States must complete the Application for Admission to Undergraduate Study for International Students available from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, New York University, 22 Washington Square North, New York, NY 10011-9191, U.S.A. Freshman applicants (those who are currently attending or who previously completed secondary school only) seeking to begin studies in the fall (September) semester must submit applications and all required credentials on or before January 15. Transfer applicants (those currently or previously attending a university or tertiary school) must submit applications and all required credentials on or before April 1. Those seeking admission for the spring (January) semester must submit their applications and credentials on or before November 1. Applications will not be processed until all supporting papers are received by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. All freshman applicants are required to submit official results of either the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT I) or the American College Test (ACT). In addition, we recommend that freshman applicants also submit scores from the SAT II Subject Tests, preferably from the Writing Examination and any other two tests. If the applicant’s secondary education culminated in a maturity certificate examination, he or she is required to submit an official copy of the grades received in each subject of his or her examinations. All documents submitted for review must be official; that is, they must be either originals or copies certified by authorized persons. A “certified” photocopy or other copy is one that bears either an original signature of the registrar or other designated school official or an original impression of the institution’s seal. Uncertified photocopies are not acceptable. If these official documents are in a foreign language, they must be accompanied by an official English translation. In addition, every applicant whose native language is not English must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). Information concerning this examination may be obtained by writing directly to TOEFL-ETS, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, NJ 08541, U.S.A., or by visiting the Web site at www.toefl.org. Each student must request that his or her score on this examination be sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.

Applicants residing in the New York area may elect to take the English proficiency test of the University’s American Language Institute, located at 48 Cooper Square, Room 200, New York, NY 10003-7154, U.S.A. An appointment to take the test may be made by telephoning (212) 998-7040. In lieu of the TOEFL, acceptable results on the APIEL (Advanced Placement International English Language) examination administered by the College Board will be considered. For information on this test, visit its Web site at www.collegeboard.com. Non-U.S. citizens and non-U.S. permanent residents must submit appropriate evidence of financial ability. The issuance of certificates for student visas (Form I-20) or exchange visitor visas (Form IAP-66) will be delayed until such evidence is received. If the applicant’s studies are being financed by means of his or her own savings, parental support, outside private or government scholarships, or any combination of these, he or she must arrange to send official letters or similar certification as proof of such support, together with the Application for Certificate of Eligibility (AFCOE) Form. This form is included with the application packet for international students. These certificates (I-20’s) will only be issued once the admitted applicant has submitted the required nonrefundable tuition and housing (if applicable) deposit. A coordinator in The Steinhardt School of Education is available for assistance in areas of special concern to international students. Students who have been admitted are expected to make an appointment to see the coordinator, Professor Griffin. The office is located in Joseph and Violet Pless Hall, 82 Washington Square East, Room 34; telephone (212) 998-5469. See also Office for International Students and Scholars, page 146.

The American Language Institute The American Language Institute of the School of Continuing and Professional Studies of New York University offers intensive courses in English for students with little or no proficiency in the language. Individuals who wish to obtain additional information about the American Language Institute are invited to telephone or visit the office of the American Language Institute weekdays throughout the year between the hours of 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. (Fridays until 5 p.m.) or to write to the American Language Institute, School of Continuing and Professional Studies, New York University, 48 Cooper Square, Room 200, New York, NY 10003-7154; telephone (212) 998-7040.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

STUDENT VISAS AND ORIENTATION Matters pertaining to student visas and orientation are administered by the Office for International Students and Scholars, 561 La Guardia Place, 1st Floor; telephone (212) 9984720. In addition, the staff of this office endeavors to aid international students in taking full advantage of various social, cultural, and recreational opportunities offered by the University and New York City.

Readmission of Former Students An undergraduate student who has not completed at least one 3-point course each year under the auspices of The Steinhardt School of Education or, in lieu of such completion, has not paid a maintenance of matriculation fee of $200, plus registration and service fees, must, if he or she wishes to return to the school, contact the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, 82 Washington Square East, Room 32, New York, NY 10003-6680. The readmission procedures for any former students who are in good academic standing are as follows: 1. Former students in The Steinhardt School of Education who have taken courses at another college or university and who wish to be considered for readmission to the school must complete the Application for Undergraduate Admission, pay the $55.00 application fee, and submit an official transcript. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions may require additional testing at the University for those with interrupted education. Applications should be submitted well in advance of the following deadlines: August 1 for the fall term, December 1 for the spring term, and April 1 for the summer term. 2. If students have not attended another college or university and have been out of school for a consecutive two-year period, they must file the special readmission application and a questionnaire with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, New York University, 22 Washington Square North, New York, NY 10011-9191. Although readmission decisions are based primarily on the applicant’s previous academic record, other factors will be considered. Students may contact the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs for more information. 3. If students have been out of school for less than a consecutive two-year period and have not attended another college or university, they must remit the maintenance of matriculation fee.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Admission • 161

Enrollment in prior year maintenance of matriculation requires the approval of the program adviser and the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs. Students should schedule an appointment with their adviser and proceed accordingly.

Credit by Examination The Advanced Placement Program (AP) (College Entrance Examination Board), International Baccalaureate Program (IB), and the results of some foreign maturity certificate examinations enable undergraduate students to receive credit toward the bachelor’s degree on the basis of performance in college-level examinations or proficiency examinations related to the school’s

degree requirements, subject to the approval of the school. The maximum number of transferable credits by examination shall not exceed a total of 60. (For freshmen, the maximum number of credits is 32.) Of these 60 credits, a maximum of 36 is allowed toward the liberal arts requirements. Students transferring with credit from the CLEP Subject Examinations should seek clarification

Advanced Placement Equivalencies AP Examination American History Biology Chemistry Classics—Vergil Classics—Lyric Computer Science A Computer Science AB English Literature Expository Writing European History French Language French Literature* German Language History of Art Macroeconomics Mathematics AB Mathematics BC Microeconomics Physics nonmajors: Physics B Physics B Physics C—Mech. Physics C—E & M Physics majors: Physics C—Mech. Physics C—E & M Politics (American Government and Politics) Politics (Comparative Government and Politics) Psychology Spanish Language Spanish Literature* Statistics

Grade 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5

Points 4 8 8 4 4 4 8 4

4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 8 4

MAP Area Satisfied Conversations of the West Natural Science I, II Natural Science I, II Expressive Culture Expressive Culture Quantitative Reasoning Quantitative Reasoning Expressive Culture No Credit Conversations of the West Foreign Languages Foreign Languages or Expressive Culture Foreign Languages Expressive Culture Societies and the Social Sciences Quantitative Reasoning Quantitative Reasoning Societies and the Social Sciences

5 4 4, 5 4, 5

10 5 5 or 3 5 or 3

Natural Science I, II Natural Science I Natural Science I Natural Science I

4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5 4, 5

5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4

Societies and the Social Sciences Societies and the Social Sciences Societies and the Social Sciences Foreign Languages Foreign Languages or Expressive Culture Quantitative Reasoning

*Students may choose one course only and corresponding MAP satisfaction.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

162 • Admission • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

of the policies regarding advanced standing credit from the advisement office once they have enrolled.

Placement Examination

The Enrollment Process

Placement examination results are used in the school under the following conditions:

To be enrolled, an admitted undergraduate candidate must do the following:

THE COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) The College Level Examination Program is administered by the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ.

1. Foreign Languages: A student who wishes to continue in a language previously studied in high school, or in college, must take a language placement test or submit Advanced Placement or SAT II test scores from the College Entrance Examination Board, or receive a recommendation for placement from the appropriate language department in the College of Arts and Science.

1. Accept the University’s offer of admission and pay the required nonreturnable tuition deposit.

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) The school recognizes for advanced standing credit, higher level examinations passed with grades of 5, 6, or 7. No credit is granted for standard level examinations. Official reports must be submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for review. MATURITY CERTIFICATE EXAMINATIONS The school will consider the results of certain foreign maturity certificate examinations for advanced standing credit, e.g., British “A” levels, French Baccalauréat, German Abitur, Italian Maturità, and the Federal Swiss Maturity Certificate. Official reports must be submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. For information regarding the possibility of advanced standing credit for other maturity certificates, please contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM (AP) The Steinhardt School of Education participates in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. According to University policy, students may receive college credit toward their degree for test results of 5 or 4. Students receiving credit toward their degree may not take the corresponding college-level course for credit. If they do, they will lose the Advanced Placement credit. No credit is given for test scores of 3, 2, or 1. Please refer to the chart on page 161.

2. Speech: Students may be exempted from the required course, E21.0033, Speech Communication, by examination. The exemption test may be applied for through the Department of Culture and Communication, East Building, Suite 735; telephone (212) 9985191. This test is given regularly throughout the academic year. Please note: Students in the Communication Studies Program are required to fulfill the speech requirement.

Exemption Examination Students have the right to seek exemption from some degree requirements through application to the pertinent academic program for an exemption examination, subject to requirements for professional certification. Exempted points do not reduce the total number of points required for the degree.

Entrance Deficiencies

2. If applicable, pay the required nonrefundable housing deposit. 3. Have his or her high school and/or college forward a final transcript to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 4. File a medical report. 5. Make an appointment with The Steinhardt School of Education for academic advisement. 6. Pay balance of tuition and/or housing fees by the stipulated deadlines. 7. Register for classes when notified. Students are advised that enrollment in other than state-registered or otherwise approved programs may jeopardize their eligibility for certain student aid awards. All Steinhardt School of Education programs are registered1 by the New York State Education Department. A copy of the State Inventory of Registered Programs is available for student review in the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, 82 Washington Square East, 4th Floor. Information on full-time undergraduate retention and graduation rates may be reviewed in the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs, 82 Washington Square East, Room 32.

Applicants who lack one or, at most, two entrance requirements sometimes are admitted “on condition.” Students with an entrance condition must register for the subject in which they are conditioned concurrently with their first-term registration. For further information, students should contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.

For additional information, students should contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, New York University, 22 Washington Square North, New York, NY 10011-9191.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

1New York State Education Department Office of Higher Education and the Professions Cultural Education Center, Room 5B28 Albany, New York 12230 (518) 474-5851.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Registration and Advisement • 163

Registration and Advisement

All degree students are assigned advisers and are urged to take full advantage of all opportunities for securing advice before selecting courses.

Degree

Students1

The adviser assigned to each student is familiar with the requirements and opportunities within the student’s program of study. The adviser will consult with the individual student concerning (1) the selection of courses where alternate choices are possible, (2) the sequence in which courses may best be taken, (3) the methods by which exemptions may be secured, and (4) the method by which desirable and necessary substitutions may be authorized.

Special (Nonmatriculated) Students Undergraduate matriculated students who are currently attending other accredited four-year colleges and maintaining good standing, both academic and disciplinary, may be admitted on certification from their own schools. Such students must be eligible to receive degree credit at their own schools for the courses taken at The Steinhardt School of Education. Those who are not currently attending another school may apply for admission upon presentation of evidence of appropriate high school averages and SAT scores or transcripts from prior colleges attended. The approval as a special undergraduate student is for one semester but may be extended on reapplication. The special application form for undergraduate students may be obtained by writing to the Office of

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Undergraduate Admissions, New York University, 22 Washington Square North, New York, NY 10011-9191. All special students must meet the academic standards of the school.

Veterans Benefits Various Department of Veterans Affairs programs provide educational benefits for spouses, sons, and daughters of deceased or permanently disabled veterans as well as for veterans and in-ser1Undergraduate students in other units of the University whose registration for required courses in their programs does not total 18 points may elect to take 2- or 3-point courses in The Steinhardt School of Education with the approval of their advisers. Such courses may or may not be credited toward the degree. Students must verify with their departments whether the courses can be applied toward the degree.

164 • Registration and Advisement • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

vice personnel, subject to certain restrictions. Under most programs the student pays tuition and fees at the time of registration but will receive a monthly allowance from Veterans Affairs.

A student is not permitted to be matriculated for more than one degree at a time.

Veterans with service-connected disabilities may be qualified for educational benefits under Chapter 31. Applicants for this program are required to submit to the Department of Veterans Affairs a letter of acceptance from the college they wish to attend. On meeting the requirements for the Department of Veterans Affairs, the veteran will be given an Authorization for Education (VA Form 22-1905), which must be presented to the Office of the University Registrar, 25 West Fourth Street, 1st Floor, before registering for course work.

Undergraduate students may drop courses via TorchTone (no forms required) through the second week of classes. After the second week, no change in schedule is valid unless it is reported to the Office of the University Registrar and the Office of the Bursar on the forms provided. Change of program forms may be obtained from the program adviser or from Registration Services, Joseph and Violet Pless Hall, 3rd Floor, 82 Washington Square East. Courses dropped during the first three weeks of the term will not appear on the transcript. Those dropped from the beginning of the fourth week through the ninth week of the term will be recorded with a grade of “W.” After the ninth week, no one may withdraw from a course. See page 171 for refund schedule.

All Veterans. Allowance checks are usually sent directly to veterans by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Veterans and eligible dependents should contact the Office of the University Registrar each term for which they desire Veterans Affairs certification of enrollment. All veterans are expected to reach the objective (bachelor’s or master’s degree, doctorate, or certificate) authorized by Veterans Affairs with the minimum number of points required. The Department of Veterans Affairs may not authorize allowance payments for credits that are in excess of scholastic requirements, that are taken for audit purposes only, or for which nonpunitive grades are received. Veterans may visit the Office of the University Registrar, 25 West Fourth Street, 1st Floor, for obtaining applications or for assistance in filing for educational benefits. Since interpretation of regulations governing veterans’ benefits is subject to change, veterans should keep in touch with the Department of Veterans Affairs or the Office of the University Registrar.

Permitted Course Loads The maximum registration allowance for fully employed students is 9 points per term. The normal full-time undergraduate program is 12-18 points. Students may, by advisement, register for 20 points. Under no circumstances may students register for more than 16 points during the term in which they are taking 6 points of student teaching. It is the adviser’s prerogative to set such limits on registration as are deemed appropriate. The regulations and procedures are more detailed than are indicated in this bulletin. They are, furthermore, subject to modification from time to time. The responsibility for meeting the degree requirements rests with the candidate.

Withdrawal from Courses

Leave of Absence Undergraduate students who are taking a leave of absence are referred to the Office of Counseling and Student Services, Joseph and Violet Pless Hall, Room 32, to complete an interview as part of the official “leave” procedure.

Termination of Matriculation Undergraduate students who are not planning to return to the school are referred to the Office of Counseling and Student Services, Joseph and Violet Pless Hall, Room 32, to complete the exit interview as part of the termination process.

Drop/Add and Withdrawal Policies By approval and signature, the adviser holds the responsibility for the student’s program requirements and courses selected. By approval and signature, the adviser attests to the courses selected as meeting degree requirements. Courses added or dropped without adviser approval may be considered as not meeting degree requirements. Students and faculty are urged to monitor this procedure carefully. Only an official adviser is authorized to sign a student’s drop/add form. Students are permitted to add to their program during the first two weeks of regular classes. A student wishing to add an additional course to the program during the third week of the term must have the approval of the instructor. Beyond the end of the third week of the term, a student may not add a course. Undergraduate students may drop courses via TorchTone (no forms required) through the second week of class. After the second week, no

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

change in schedule is valid unless it is reported to the Office of the University Registrar on the forms provided. Change of program forms may be obtained from the program adviser. Courses officially dropped during the first three weeks of the term will not appear on the transcript. Those dropped from the beginning of the fourth week through the ninth week of the term will be recorded with a grade of “W.” After the ninth week, no one may withdraw from a course.

Change of Curriculum Undergraduate students who are changing their curriculum must complete an official change of curriculum form, available in the Office of Counseling and Student Services, or in the Office of the Undergraduate Evaluator, Joseph and Violet Pless Hall, 82 Washington Square East, 2nd Floor. This form is to be completed by students who are changing their curriculum from one program to another within the same department in The Steinhardt School of Education or from one department to another in The Steinhardt School of Education. Students who are transferring from this school to another school of New York University must make the change through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 22 Washington Square North. These students are reminded, however, also to fill out a Steinhardt School of Education withdrawal form in the Office of Counseling and Student Services.

Minors Students may complete their undergraduate degree with an academic major and a second field, an academic minor. Like the major, a completed minor will be listed on the student’s transcript. A minor consists of a minimum of 16 points, with the actual number of points to be determined by the faculty in the program in which the minor is elected. Students who wish to undertake a minor should see their faculty adviser for permission and for information concerning courses required to complete minors in other areas of specialization. The declaration consists of completing a form that names the minor field, lists the courses that count toward the minor, and includes the signatures of the student, the faculty adviser, the program director of the minor department, and the associate dean for student services and public affairs. The necessary form may be obtained from the Office of the Undergraduate Evaluator, Joseph and Violet Pless Hall, 2nd Floor. A minor can be declared at any time prior to the completion of 96 points.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • General Information • 165

General Information

Classification of Students

Attendance

Note: There are no A+, D-, or F+ grades.

Undergraduate students are classified as follows:

Regulations governing required or voluntary class attendance in the school are determined by individual instructors.

W = Official withdrawal. If withdrawal occurs after the midpoint of the term and the student is failing at that time, the grade will be reported as F.

1. Matriculated students—those who have been approved for study toward a B.S. 2. Special students—those who have filed a formal application and credentials showing that they are qualified to take courses but are not degree candidates in The Steinhardt School of Education. Special students must meet the same requirements for admission as matriculants. 3. Freshmen—students who have successfully completed 1-32 points. Sophomores—students who have successfully completed 33-64 points. Juniors—students who have successfully completed 65-96 points. Seniors—students who have successfully completed over 96 points.

Grades The scale of grades is based on a 4-point scale as follows: A = 4.0 points C+ = 2.3 points A- = 3.7 points C = 2.0 points B+ = 3.3 points C- = 1.7 points B = 3.0 points D+ = 1.3 points B- = 2.7 points D = 1.0 points F = 0 points. If a student repeats a course in which he or she had received a failing grade, only the second grade is counted in the average.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

R = Registered paid auditor, not graded. P = Pass, not counted in average. N = Not counted (see Note, pages 165-66). IP = Incomplete but passing—term paper or other work or final examination lacking (grade given only with the permission of the instructor); may be made up within time limits (see Note, pages 165-66). If not made up, grade lapses to N. IF = Incomplete but not passing; may be made up within time limits. If not made up, grade lapses to F. The F will be calculated into the GPA. Note: “E” courses: Under exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the course

166 • General Information • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

instructor, an Incomplete Pass (IP) or an Incomplete Fail (IF) may be granted, based on the student’s performance throughout the course of the semester. The length of the contract period is fixed by the instructor, but will be no longer than six months after the close of the semester. If outstanding work has not been completed by the end of the agreed time, an “IP” becomes an “N” (No Credit) and an “IF” becomes an “F.” If the contract has been completed in a timely manner, it will be considered along with the remainder of the course performance, to determine the student’s earned grade. No extension will be granted beyond the end of contract date. Students with 12 credits or more of IP, IF, or N on their transcripts at any one time will be considered as not making satisfactory progress in their programs of study and will be subject to probation. Students who have three probationary terms or two consecutive probationary terms will be subject to dismissal. They will be subject to dismissal if they have 20 such credits on their transcripts at any one time. (Any “N” grade course that has been repeated with a passing grade will not be counted in these totals, nor will courses in which “I” grades are normally given.) “V” courses: A grade of “I” must be removed by the end of the next regular semester. For students on a leave of absence, a grade of “I” must be removed within one year from the date of last attendance in the course concerned.

Graduation with Honors

the school through an 800 number or E-mail.

To qualify for honors, a student must have completed at least 64 points toward the degree (in weighted grades) in residence and must have maintained a minimum general average as follows:

For further information on international student exchanges, contact the Student Center for International Study, New York University, Main Building, 100 Washington Square East, Room 901C, New York, NY 10003-6688; (212) 998-8720 (E-mail address: [emailprotected] nyu.edu).

cum laude—3.5 magna cum laude—3.7 summa cum laude—3.9

Special Awards for Excellence and Service to the School The associate dean for student services and public affairs administers special awards for scholarship and service to the school, which include the John W. Withers Memorial Award and the E. George Payne Memorial Award, awarded to graduating seniors who have shown evidence of exemplary scholarship and service to the school; the Ida Bodman Award and the Samuel Eshborn Service Award, given on the basis of the quality of service that a student has given to the school; and the Arch Award, awarded to graduating seniors based on the unique and beneficial quality of their cumulative record of service to their fellow students, faculty, and administration of the school.

The lowest passing grade is “D” (see Division of Nursing for differing policies). If at the end of any term a student’s cumulative average is below 2.0, the student will be placed on probation and his or her status reported to his or her curriculum adviser. No student will be entitled to more than three probationary terms, and not more than two of these consecutively. A general average of 2.0 is required for graduation with the bachelor’s degree.

Study Abroad

Note: We urge students taking “V,” “G,” “H,” and “C” courses to check with schools for details of their grading policies because they differ from those of The Steinhardt School of Education.

Students have the opportunity to study abroad or to participate in an exchange with another outstanding urban university for a semester or a year as part of their NYU education. Among the European universities currently involved in the exchange are the Universities of Amsterdam, Bonn, Copenhagen, Florence, Stockholm, and Vienna, and Humbolt University in Berlin. Negotiations are under way with institutions in Africa, Eastern Europe, and Latin America as well. NYU students who participate in the exchange remain matriculated at NYU, pay NYU tuition, and receive financial aid just as if they were attending classes at Washington Square; they apply for the exchange after consulting with their adviser and, once abroad, retain access to

Dean’s List At the end of the fall and spring terms, a Dean’s List is compiled. This is an honor roll for students who have maintained a term average of 3.6 or better in a program of studies of at least 8 points in The Steinhardt School of Education, Undergraduate Division. Grades of “I” or “N” disqualify the student.

Students may fulfill a limited number of their course requirements through various study abroad programs. Such programs are offered through the Office of Special Programs (for further information, see page 11 and individual program descriptions).

International Student Exchanges

Auditing1 Undergraduate matriculated students may audit a maximum of two (2) courses in The Steinhardt School of Education per term with the approval of the course instructor. The total number of credit and audit courses for full-time students may not exceed 19 points in a given term; the total number of credit and audit courses for part-time students may not exceed 11 points in a given term. Audit courses do not count toward full-time status. No credit will be given or letter grades recorded and no withdrawals will be honored or refunds granted on courses so audited. Students receiving any form of financial aid must show evidence of full-time credit registration before requesting auditing privileges. Tuition remission may not be applied. Auditing forms may be obtained from and must be filed in the Office of the University Registrar, 25 West Fourth Street, 1st Floor, prior to beginning of the term in question.

Pass/Fail Option1 Matriculated students have the option to take courses on a pass/fail basis, the maximum of such courses not to exceed 25 percent of the student’s total program and not to exceed 25 percent in specialization. The student is responsible for adherence to these regulations. Courses that are departmentally designated as pass/fail shall not be included in the 25 percent pass/fail option open to students. This pass/fail option can be applied only to “E,” “V,” or “C” courses. Once this option is utilized, such decision cannot be changed nor will the letter grade be recorded. Pass/fail grades are not considered “weighted grades.” (To qualify for honors, a student must have completed at least 64 points toward the degree in weighted grades in residence.) Pass/fail option forms may be obtained from Registration Services, Pless Hall, 3rd Floor, and must be filed in the Office of the University Registrar, 25 West Fourth Street, 1st Floor, prior to the end of the fifth (5th) week of the term for fall and spring term

1

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Not available to special students.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • General Information • 167

courses. The fifth (5th) meeting of the class is the final date for filing pass/fail option forms for courses taken during the summer sessions.

Independent Study It should be noted that independent study requires a minimum of 45 hours of work per point. Independent study cannot be used to satisfy the required 60 points in liberal arts courses, nor can it be applied to the established professional education sequence in teaching curricula. Each departmental program has established its own maximum credit allowance for independent study as part of specialization. This information may be obtained from a student’s departmental adviser. Each student is permitted to enroll for an additional 1-6 points of independent study outside the area of specialization. Prior to registering for independent study, each student should obtain an Independent Study Approval Form from the adviser. When completed, this form must be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar, 25 West Fourth Street, 1st Floor.

Full-Time Equivalency The University defines full-time course work to be a minimum of 12 points each term. It is considered to be equivalent to 40 hours of study per week. Full-time equivalency students are expected to spend no less than 40 hours per week on a combination of course work and the item that appears below. ELIGIBILITY CATEGORIES FOR FULL-TIME EQUIVALENCY English proficiency: An international student taking a noncredit course in English proficiency may receive some equivalency credit. This is determined by the international student adviser. Please note: Certification of full-time study must be determined at the time of registration. The only way in which full-time equivalency can be officially established is by a fully completed equivalency form. Equivalency credits given through the American Language Institute (Z30.) are not eligible for financial aid purposes. Information relating to equivalency status may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs, 82 Washington Square East, 2nd Floor.

Transcripts of Record Requests for official transcripts require the signature of the student requesting the transcript. Currently, we are not accepting requests for a transcript by E-mail. A transcript may be requested in writing by either faxing ([212] 995-4154) or sending a signed letter to the Office of the University Registrar, New York University, P.O. Box 910, New York, NY 10276-0910. A request for a transcript must include all of the following information: Social Security or student ID number; current name and any name under which you attended NYU; current address; date of birth; school of the University attended and for which you are requesting the transcript; dates of attendance; date of graduation; and full name and address of the person or institution to which the transcript is to be sent. Please allow seven business days from the time the Office of the University Registrar is in receipt of your request for registration processing. Please note the following: there is no charge for academic transcripts; the limit for official transcripts issued to the student is three. A request for more than three transcripts requires the full name and address of the college, university, prospective employer, or scholarship agency to which the transcripts will be sent. You can indicate in your request if you would like us to forward the transcripts to your home address, but we still require the name and address of each institution. Once a final examination period has begun, no transcript will be forwarded for any student who is currently enrolled in courses until all the student’s final grades have been received and recorded. Please notify the Office of the University Registrar immediately of any change of address. Students are able to access their grades at the end of each semester via TorchTone, NYU’s automated telephone registration and information system, at (212) 995-4747, or via Albert, NYU’s Web-based registration and information system, at www.albert.nyu.edu.

Information on How to Request Enrollment Verification Verification of enrollment or graduation may be requested by submitting a signed letter with the following information: Social Security or student ID number, current name and any name under which you attended NYU, current address, date of birth, school of the University attended, dates attended, date of graduation, and the full name and address of the person or institution to which the verification is to be sent. Please address your request to Office of the University Registrar,

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Enrollment Verification and Graduation, New York University, P.O. Box 910, New York, NY 10276-0910. Or you can fax your signed request to (212) 995-4154. Please allow seven business days from the time the Office of the University Registrar is in receipt of your request. Currently, we are not accepting requests for certification by E-mail.

Diploma Application Students may officially graduate in September, January, or May. The Commencement ceremony for all schools is held in May. You must apply for graduation by dialing TorchTone (212) 9954747 and selecting Option 5 in the Office of the Registrar’s menu. In order to graduate in a specific semester, you must apply for graduation within the application deadline period indicated on the calendar. (Students may view the graduation deadlines calendar and general information about graduation in the Office of the University Registrar’s Web page at www.nyu.edu/registrar.) It is recommended that you apply for graduation no later than the beginning of the semester in which you plan to complete all program requirements. If you do not successfully complete all academic requirements by the end of the semester, you must reapply for graduation for the following cycle.

Arrears Policy The University reserves the right to deny registration and withhold all information regarding the record of any student who is in arrears in the payment of tuition, fees, loans, or other charges (including charges for housing, dining, or other activities or services) for as long as any arrears remain.

Discipline Students are expected to familiarize themselves and to comply with the rules of conduct, academic regulations, and established practices of the University and The Steinhardt School of Education. If, pursuant to such rules, regulations, or practices, the withdrawal of a student is required before the end of the term for which tuition has been paid, a refund will be made according to the standard schedule for refunds.

University Policy on Patents Students offered research opportunities are reminded that inventions arising from participation in such research are governed by the University’s “Statement of Policy on Patents,” a

168 • General Information • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

copy of which may be found in the Faculty Handbook or obtained from the dean’s office.

Policies Concerning Academic Integrity The relationship between students and faculty is the keystone of the educational experience at New York University in The Steinhardt School of Education. This relationship takes an honor code for granted and mutual trust, respect, and responsibility as foundational requirements. Thus, how you learn is as important as what you learn. A university education aims not only to produce high-quality scholars, but to also cultivate honorable citizens. Academic integrity is the guiding principle for all that you do, from taking exams to making oral presentations to writing term papers. It requires that you recognize and acknowledge information derived from others and take credit only for ideas and work that are yours.

You violate the principle of academic integrity when you

• copy verbatim from a book, an article, or other media;

• cheat on an exam,

• download documents from the Internet;

• submit the same work for two different courses without prior permission from your professors,

• purchase documents;

• receive help on a take-home examination that calls for independent work, or • plagiarize. Plagiarism, one of the gravest forms of academic dishonesty in university life, whether intended or not, is academic fraud. In a community of scholars, whose members are teaching, learning, and discovering knowledge, plagiarism cannot be tolerated. Plagiarism is failure to properly assign authorship to a paper, a document, an oral presentation, a musical score, and/or other materials that are not your original work. You plagiarize when, without proper attribution, you do any of the following:

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

• report from other’s oral work; • paraphrase or restate someone else’s facts, analysis, and/or conclusions; or • copy directly from a classmate or allow a classmate to copy from you. The Steinhardt School of Education imposes heavy penalties for plagiarism in order to safeguard the degrees that the University grants. Cases of plagiarism are considered among the most serious of offenses. (See NYU Student’s Guide.)

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid • 169

Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid

When estimating the cost of a university education, students should consider two factors: (1) the total cost of tuition, fees, and materials related to a particular program plus costs directly related to the choice of living style (dormitory, apartment, commuting costs) and (2) financial aid that may be available from a variety of sources. Information on these distinct but related topics follows.

Tuition and Fees Following is the schedule of fees established by the Board of Trustees of New York University for the year 2002-2003. The Board of Trustees reserves the right to alter this schedule without notice. Tuition, fees, and expenses may be expected to increase in subsequent years and will be listed in supplements to this bulletin. Note that the registration and services fee covers

memberships, dues, etc., to the student’s class organization and the day organization and entitles the student to membership in such University activities as are supported by this allocation and to receive regularly those University and school publications that are supported in whole or in part by the student activities fund. It also includes the University’s health services and emergency and accident coverage. All fees are payable at the time of registration. The Office of the Bursar is located at 25 West Fourth Street. Checks and drafts are to be drawn to the order of New York University for the exact amount of the tuition and fees required. In the case of overpayment, the balance is refunded upon request by filing a refund application in the Office of the Bursar. Holders of New York State Tuition Assistance Program Awards will be allowed credit toward their tuition fees in the amount of their entitle-

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

ment, provided they are enrolled on a full-time basis and they present with their schedule/bill the Award Certificate for the applicable term. Students who receive awards after registration will receive a check from the University after the New York State payment has been received by the Office of the Bursar and the Office of the University Registrar has confirmed eligibility. The unpaid balance of a student’s account is subject to an interest charge of 12 percent per annum from the first day of class until payment is received. A fee will be charged if payment is not made by the due date indicated on the student’s statement.

Arrears Policy The University reserves the right to deny registration and withhold all information regard-

170 • Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

ing the record of any student who is in arrears in the payment of tuition, fees, loans, or other charges (including charges for housing, dining, or other activities or services) for as long as any arrears remain.

Graduation No candidate may be recommended for a degree until all required fees have been paid. The University cannot be responsible for the inclusion in the current official graduation list of any candidate who pays fees after the first day of May, September, or January, for degrees in May, September, or January, respectively. Following the payment of all required fees, and on approval of the faculty, the candidate will be recommended for the degree as of the date of the next regular meeting of the University Board of Trustees at which the awarding of degrees is a part of the order of business. The following is an explanatory schedule of fees for 2002-2003.

Tuition 12 to 18 points per term

$12,475.00

Fall term 2002; nonreturnable registration and services fee Spring term 2003; nonreturnable registration and services fee

848.00 848.00

Comprehensive Health Insurance Benefit Plan (international students automatically enrolled,2, 3 all others can select): Fall term $619.00 Spring term (coverage for the spring and summer terms) 928.00 Summer term (for students who did not register in the preceding term) 387.00

Course-Related Fees:

UHC Only Health Insurance Benefit Plan (any student can select, but must maintain other insurance): Fall term $234.00 Spring term (coverage for the spring and summer terms) 353.00 Summer term (for students who did not register in the preceding term) 147.00 3

Stu-Dent Plan (dental services through NYU’s College of Dentistry): Initial enrollment—academic year $160.00 Renewal—academic year $130.00

Spring term 2003; nonreturnable registration and services fee, per point, for registration after first point

60.00

E85.0063

60.00

E85.1021

60.00

E85.1034

60.00

E85.1045

60.00

E85.1056

60.00

E85.1063

60.00

Science Education Laboratory fee: To be paid when registering for E14.1035

50.00

E14.1170

50.00

Application fee for admission (nonreturnable, see page 158)

55.00

E14.1171

50.00

Deposit upon acceptance (nonreturnable)

Late registration fee commencing with the second week of classes Late registration fee commencing with the fifth week of classes

266.00

E85.0056

10.00

252.00

Spring term 2003; nonreturnable registration and services fee, first point

60.00

Penalty fee

Fall term 2002; nonreturnable registration and services fee, first point

50.00

E85.0045

$50.00

729.00

Fall term 2002; nonreturnable registration and services fee, per point, for registration after first point

$60.00

E14.1023

Students taking fewer than 12 points, per point, per term

779.00

E85.0034

Late tuition payment fee (other than late registration) 25.00

Maintenance of matriculation, per academic year Fall term 2002; nonreturnable registration and services fee Spring term 2003 (coverage for spring and summer terms); nonreturnable registration and services fee

For each point taken in excess of 18, per point, per term (includes a nonreturnable registration and services fee of $50.00 per point)1

Music and Music Education Private Instruction fee: To be paid when registering for

Duplicate rating sheet

200.00

Estimate of Expenses for Entering Full-Time Students

200.00

See the Office of Financial Aid Web site: www.nyu.edu/financial.aid.

202.00

Withdrawal and Refund of Tuition 216.00 50.00 100.00 2.00

Reevaluation and curriculum charges

15.00

Special validation examination

10.00

Makeup examination

20.00

50.00

A student who for any reason finds it impossible to complete a course for which he or she has registered should consult with an academic adviser. An official withdrawal must be filed either by TorchTone (through the first three weeks of the term only) or in writing on a completed Change of Program form with the Office of the Bursar. (Note: An official withdrawal must be filed if a course has been canceled, and, in this case, the student is entitled to a refund of tuition and fees paid.) Withdrawal does not necessarily entitle the student to a refund of tuition paid or a cancellation of tuition still due. A refund of tuition will be made provided such withdrawal is filed within the scheduled refund period for the term (see schedule, page 171).

General Fees Basic Health Insurance Benefit Plan (full-time students automatically enrolled,2, 3 all others can select): Fall term $512.00 Spring term (coverage for the spring and summer terms) 769.00 Summer term (for students who did not register in the preceding term) 321.00

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

1

Accelerated nursing students in the Division of Nursing pay additionally for each point taken in excess of 20 points.

2

Waiver option available.

3

Students automatically enrolled in the Basic Plan or the Comprehensive Plan can change between plans, waive the plan entirely (and show proof of other acceptable health insurance), or can select the UHC Only Plan.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid • 171

Merely ceasing to attend a class does not constitute official withdrawal, nor does notification of the instructor. A stop payment of a check presented for tuition does not constitute withdrawal, nor does it reduce the indebtedness to the University. The nonreturnable registration and services fee and a penalty of $10.00 for a stopped payment must be charged in addition to any tuition not canceled.

Exceptions to the published refund schedule may be appealed in writing to the refund committee of the school of registration and should be supported by appropriate documentation regarding the circumstances that warrant consideration of an exception. Exceptions are rarely granted. Students who withdraw should review the “Refunds” page on the Office of the Bursar’s Web site (www.nyu.edu/bursar).

The date on which the Change of Program form is filed, not the last date of attendance in class, is considered the official date of withdrawal. It is this date that serves as the basis for computing any refund granted the student.

Federal regulations require adjustments reducing financial aid if a student withdraws even after the NYU refund period. Financial aid amounts will be adjusted for students who withdraw through the ninth week of the semester and have received any federal grants or loans. This adjustment may result in the student’s bill not being fully paid. NYU will bill the student for this difference. The student will be responsible for payment of this bill before returning to NYU and will remain responsible for payment even if he or she does not return to NYU.

The refund period (see schedule below) is defined as the first four calendar weeks of the term for which application for withdrawal is filed. No application will be considered that is filed after the fourth week. The processing of refunds takes approximately two weeks.

Refund Period Schedule (fall and spring terms only) This schedule is based on the total applicable charge for tuition excluding nonreturnable fees and deposits. Withdrawal before the official opening date of the term (See Note 1, below)

100%

Withdrawal within the first calendar week1 from the opening date of the term 100% Withdrawal within the second calendar week from the opening date of the term

70%

Withdrawal within the third calendar week from the opening date of the term

55%

Withdrawal within the fourth calendar week from the opening date of the term

25%

Withdrawal after completion of the fourth calendar week of the term

NONE

Note 1: Applicable on the first day of the term to those registrants not allowed by the calendar to change programs until that date. Newly enrolled students are subject to a different refund percentage policy. Please call the Office of the Bursar at (212) 998-2818 for further information. The above refund schedule is not applicable to undergraduate students whose registration remains within the flat-fee range. Please note: A student may not withdraw from a class the last three weeks of the fall or spring term or the last three days of each summer session. It should be noted that both the registration and services fee are in no case returnable.

For any semester a student receives any aid, that semester will be counted in the satisfactory academic progress standard. This may require the student to make up credits before receiving any further aid. Please review the “satisfactory academic progress” standard for The Steinhardt School of Education so you do not jeopardize future semesters of aid.

Financial Aid New York University believes that students should be able to choose the college that offers them the best range of educational opportunities. In order to make that choice possible, New York University attempts to aid students who are in need of financial assistance. Financial aid is awarded in an effort to help students meet the difference between their own resources and the cost of education. All awards are subject to availability of funds and the student’s demonstrated need. Renewal of assistance depends on annual reevaluation of a student’s need, the availability of funds, the successful completion of the previous year, and satisfactory progress toward completion of degree requirements. In addition, students must meet the published filing deadlines. Detailed information on financial aid is forwarded with the admission application (and see also the Office of Financial Aid at www.nyu.edu/financial.aid). Many awards are granted purely on the basis of scholastic merit. Others are based on financial need. However, it is frequently possible to receive a combination of awards based on both. Thus University scholarships or fellowships may be granted by themselves or in conjunction with student loans or Federal Work-Study employ-

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

ment. To ensure that maximum sources of available support will be investigated, students must apply for financial aid by the appropriate deadline. Student responsibilities. It is the student’s responsibility to supply true, accurate, and complete information and to inform the Office of Financial Aid immediately of any changes or corrections in his or her housing status or financial situation, including tuition remission benefits or outside grants, once application has been made. A student who has received a financial aid award must inform his or her department and the Office of Financial Aid if he or she subsequently decides to decline all or part of that award. To neglect to do so prevents use of the award by another student. If a student has not claimed his or her award (has not enrolled) by the close of regular (not late) registration and has not obtained written permission from his or her department and the Office of Financial Aid for an extension, the award may be canceled, and the student may become ineligible to receive scholarship or fellowship aid in future years. Determination of financial need is also based on the number of courses for which the student indicates he or she intends to register. A change in registration therefore may necessitate an adjustment in financial aid.

How to Apply Students must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and later, New York State residents must also complete the preprinted New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) application, which is mailed automatically to the student by the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC) after the FAFSA is processed. The FAFSA is the basic form for all student aid programs; be sure to complete all sections. Students should give permission on the FAFSA for application data to be sent directly to New York University (the NYU federal code number is 002785). Note: There is no separate application for NYU scholarships. All students are automatically considered for academic meritbased and financial need-based scholarships after applying for admission and financial aid. The FAFSA and the Admissions Application contain all the information needed for scholarship determination. Students are encouraged to apply for financial aid electronically—the fastest and most accurate method. Information is transmitted directly to 1

The first calendar week consists of the first seven (7) days beginning with the official opening date of the term (Note: not the first day of the class meeting).

172 • Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

the U.S. Department of Education and eliminates the additional processing time and potential error associated with a traditional paper FAFSA. The process is quicker and better for both the student and New York University. See www.nyu.edu/financial.aid. The FAFSA is also available from the student’s current high school or institution, or from the Office of Financial Aid, New York University, 25 West Fourth Street, New York, NY 10012-1119. Entering freshmen should submit the application by February 15 for the fall term or by November 1 for the spring term. Continuing and graduate students should consult the Financial Aid Web site or their department for individual deadlines. Students requiring summer financial aid must submit a summer aid application in addition to the FAFSA and TAP application. The application becomes available in February and can be obtained from the Financial Aid Web site or the Office of Financial Aid. Complete all applications at least 12 weeks before the beginning of the term in which funds are needed.

Eligibility To be considered for financial aid students must be officially admitted to NYU or matriculated in a degree program and making satisfactory academic progress toward degree requirements. Students in certain certificate or diploma programs may also be eligible for consideration. Generally, University-administered aid is awarded to full-time students. Half-time students (fewer than 12 but at least 6 points per semester) may be eligible for a Federal Stafford Loan or a Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS), but they must also maintain satisfactory academic progress. Part-time undergraduate students may also be eligible for Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS) (New York State residents only— separate application is necessary) or for Pell Grants. Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Continuing students must submit a Renewal FAFSA each year by the NYU deadline, continue to demonstrate financial need, make satisfactory progress toward degree requirements, and be in good academic standing. CITIZENSHIP In order to be eligible for aid both from NYU and from federal and state government sources, students must be classified either as U.S. citizens or as eligible noncitizens. Noncitizen students are considered to be eligible for financial aid if one of the following conditions applies: 1. U.S. permanent resident with an Alien

Registration Receipt Card (“green card”), I-151 or I-551. 2. Conditional permanent resident (I-151C). 3. Other eligible noncitizen with an ArrivalDeparture Record (I-94) from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service showing any one of the following designations: (a) “Refugee,” (b) “Indefinite Parole,” (c) “Humanitarian Parole,” (d) “Asylum Granted,” or (e) “Cuban-Haitian Entrant.”

University-Sponsored and -Administered Programs Through the generosity of its alumni and other concerned citizens, as well as from funds supplied by the federal government, the University is able to provide an extensive financial aid program for its students. Awards, made on a competitive basis, are based on the student’s record of academic achievement and test scores as well as financial need. SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS Scholarships and grants awarded by the University generally range from $500 to full tuition, room, and board. In addition, the University has established separate scholarship funds for students in the following special situations: New York University Merit and Achievement Scholarships. The University sponsors scholarships for finalists in the annual National Merit and National Achievement Scholarship Programs. New York University must be listed as the first choice of schools in order to qualify for New York University Merit and Achievement Scholarships. Trustees Scholars. A program of Trustees Scholarships was established in 1983 in order to recognize the exceptional promise of new freshman and transfer students who meet special academic criteria: outstanding high school/college grade point averages and SAT scores. Each scholar receives generous scholarship aid and is invited to participate in a series of special lectures and other events. University Scholars. A select number of new freshmen are designated as University Scholars based on their high school records of achievement and service. In addition to the special academic privileges accorded to the scholars, they receive a merit scholarship and additional financial aid, based on need, up to the amount of tuition. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG). These federally

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

funded grants are awarded to undergraduates whose financial need is substantial. All FAFSA filers who qualify are automatically considered for this grant. However, funds for this program are very limited. Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship Program. This program, established in 1984, honors members of the national honor society for two-year colleges. It provides minimum scholarships of $2,500 for students entering New York University as juniors after completing degree programs at two-year colleges. Transfer students with grade point averages of at least 3.8 are eligible. LOAN PROGRAMS Federal Perkins Loan Program. The University administers the Federal Perkins Loan Program, supported by the federal government. The University determines eligibility for a Perkins Loan based on a student’s financial need and availability of funds; students are considered for this loan when they apply for financial aid. Perkins Loans are made possible through a combination of resources: an annual allocation from the U.S. Department of Education, a contribution from New York University, and repayments by previous borrowers. New York University generally awards Perkins Loans to the neediest full-time students only. The annual interest rate is currently 5 percent, and interest does not accrue while the student remains enrolled at least half-time. NYU undergraduates may borrow up to $2,000 for each of the first two years and up to $1,500 for each of the third and fourth years. PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT The Federal Work-Study Program. Established under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, this program is supported by both federal and University funds and is administered by the University. This means that students are eligible to work by using NYU’s student employment services, including the Federal Work-Study Program, and may earn up to the amount recommended in their award package. Federal Work-Study jobs, averaging from 15 to 20 hours per week, are secured through NYU’s Student Employment and Internship Center (located at 5 Washington Place). It is the student’s responsibility to visit the center and apply for a job. Positions in various on-campus departments and organizations are readily available (though not guaranteed) and usually pay $7.50 to $8.00 or more per hour. Students are not required to meet their earnings expectation through the Federal Work-Study Program and may choose not to accept Federal Work-Study and instead seek employment in an

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid • 173

on-campus or off-campus job in which wages are paid entirely by the employer’s budget. Academic year earnings are not credited toward tuition and fees or room and board but are paid directly to the student on a biweekly basis. Money earned from employment is normally used for books, transportation, and personal expenses. It is not necessary to be awarded academic year earnings in order to use the services of the Student Employment and Internship Center. All students may use the center as soon as they have paid their tuition deposit and may also wish to use the center as a resource for summer employment. Extensive listings of both on-campus and off-campus jobs are available. Resident Assistantships. Resident assistants reside in the undergraduate dormitories and are responsible for organizing, implementing, and evaluating social and educational activities. Assistants also serve as peer counselors and sources of information for dormitory residents. Candidates must be single, full-time students and have a current cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5. Candidates should also possess qualities that support the social and intellectual development of undergraduate students and be willing to assume responsibility for managing crises. Assistants’ compensation is room and board. Applications and further information may be obtained from the Office of Housing and Residence Life, New York University, 33 Washington Square West, 1st Floor, New York, NY 10011-9154. New York City. As one of the nation’s largest urban areas, New York City offers a wide variety of opportunities for part-time work. Many students work in order to gain experience in a field that they may wish to enter after graduation and to help meet educational expenses. Many employers list positions with NYU’s Office of Student Employment and Internships.

All Other Sources of Aid STATE GRANTS New York State and other states offer a variety of grants (see the New York Higher Education Services Corporation Web site at www.hesc.com). Although application is made directly to the state and grants are awarded by the state, the amount each student is expected to receive is estimated and taken into account by the University when drawing up the student’s financial aid package. All applications for state scholarship aid should be filed at least two months before bills are due or by the deadline the state specifies, whichever is earlier.

New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP). Legal residents of the state of New York who are enrolled in a full-time degree program of at least 12 points a term, or the equivalent, may be eligible for awards under this program. The award varies, depending on income and tuition cost. Students applying for TAP must do so via a FAFSA application, or they may contact the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC) at 1-888-NYS-HESC for an express TAP application. TAP change forms are available at the HESC Web site. Return the completed application as instructed. Do not send the forms to NYU. If you receive a TAP award for the fall or spring semester, you will be given a credit on your Bursar Statement of Account. Credit is not extended for the summer term because the state of New York defers payment on these awards. Students who are registered as half time for the summer will receive their TAP award at the end of the following year, if eligible. Students registered as full time will receive payment at the end of the fall semester of the same year. Holders of New York State Grants or Fellowships may also receive the TAP award, but it cannot be more than the amount by which the tuition for the semester exceeds the grant or fellowship. A student who has tuition remission privileges from the University may be eligible for TAP funds. Consult the Office of the Bursar, 25 West Fourth Street, for further details. Students may receive TAP assistance for a maximum of four years of undergraduate study (or five years in an approved five-year baccalaureate program) and four years of graduate study, but not for more than eight years of combined graduate and undergraduate study, provided they fulfill all state requirements for award eligibility such as those for attendance, academic progress, program pursuit, and income analysis. Regents Grants for Children of Deceased or Disabled Veterans. Grants in the amount of $450 are given for each of four years of undergraduate study. These awards are not limited to high school seniors. Students may apply at any time during their undergraduate career, but no awards will be granted retroactively. There is no competitive examination. Students should write to the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation and request the appropriate application. See also www.hesc.com. Regents Grants for Children of Deceased or Disabled Police Officers or Firefighters. The deceased parent of the student must have served either as a police officer, as defined in criminal procedure law, or as a firefighter or volunteer firefighter of New York State or any of its municipalities and must have died after June 1982. In the

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

case of a disabled parent, the injury must have been sustained in the line of duty. Students may receive this grant for a maximum of four years of undergraduate study (or five years in an approved five-year baccalaureate program, e.g., nursing, HEOP). The award is $450 per year, without consideration of income or tuition. Both this grant and the TAP award together cannot exceed the cost of tuition. See also www.hesc.com. Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS). A financial aid program to help New York State residents pursuing part-time undergraduate degree study offers awards in amounts of up to $1,000 per semester. The amount of an award is determined by the institution. To be eligible, the student must have applied for a Federal Pell Grant (file the FAFSA), must not have exhausted his or her TAP eligibility, must have already accrued 6 credits or the equivalent, and must be enrolled for 3 to 11 credits per term. Applications are available from the Financial Aid Web site or the Office of Financial Aid. The application deadline varies; please consult the Office of Financial Aid. Vietnam Veterans Tuition Awards. To qualify for this award, the student must have been a New York State resident on the effective date of the law that established the program (April 20, 1984) or at the time of entry into service and resumed residency by September 1, 1995. Veterans must have served in the U.S. Armed Forces in Indochina between December 22, 1961, and May 7, 1975. The veteran must apply for both a TAP award and a Federal Pell Grant if he or she intends to enroll full time and for a Federal Pell Grant if only part-time study is planned. Full-time awards—$1,000 per term for NYU students—are available for up to eight terms for a four-year program or 10 terms in an approved five-year curriculum. Part-time awards are $500 per term for NYU students, and these are available for eligible students taking 6 to 11 credit hours per term, or the equivalent, in an approved undergraduate degree program. Awards for parttime study are available for 16 terms (eight years) or for 20 terms (10 years) in programs specifically approved as requiring five years of full-time study. The aggregate of all awards received under this program cannot exceed $10,000. If the veteran also receives a TAP award, the combination of the two awards cannot exceed tuition. For an application, veterans should write to Vietnam Veterans Tuition Awards, HESC, 1 Commerce Plaza, Albany, NY 12255. See also www.hesc.com. States Other Than New York. Students from outside New York State should apply to their state scholarship programs if the awarded funds can

174 • Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

be used at New York University. Currently, students living in Rhode Island, Vermont, the District of Columbia, Maryland, and, in some cases, Delaware may use their state scholarships at New York University. To apply for a state scholarship, contact your state financial aid agency for program requirements and application procedures. When you receive an eligibility notice from your state program, you should submit it to the New York University Office of Financial Aid in advance of registration. Note: Other states that award education grants are also considering provisions to allow their residents to use funds out of state. To find out if your state is one of these, write to the state education department in the capital of your state or call 1-800-433-3243 for the address and telephone number of your state agency. FEDERAL GRANTS AND BENEFITS Pell Grants Program. This program is designed to provide financial assistance to undergraduate students who are registered. The grant is based on need. The maximum award is currently $3,750 per academic year. By submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), you also apply for a Federal Pell Grant. Veterans Benefits. Various programs provide educational benefits for spouses, sons, and daughters of deceased or permanently disabled veterans as well as for veterans and in-service personnel who served on active duty in the United States Armed Forces after January 1, 1955. In these programs, the amount of benefits varies. Applications and further information may be obtained from the student’s regional office of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Additional guidance may be obtained from the Office of the University Registrar, 25 West Fourth Street, 1st Floor. OUTSIDE SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS Students may be eligible for a specialized scholarship or grant from an outside agency. Some sources to explore are employers, unions, professional organizations, and community and special interest groups. A number of extensive scholarship search resources are available free on the Internet, and several are featured on the NYU Office of Financial Aid Web site. Students must notify the Office of Financial Aid if they receive funds from any of these sources.

FEDERAL LOANS Subsidized Stafford Student Loan Program (SSL). The federal subsidized Stafford Student Loan Program provides low-interest student loans using the capital of lending institutions and the administrative facilities of state agencies. These loans are made by independent banks or lending institutions and are generally insured by both the state and federal governments. An undergraduate student may borrow up to a maximum of $2,625 for the freshman year and $3,500 for the sophomore year of study. The maximum for juniors and seniors is $5,500 with a total borrowing limit of $23,000. A graduate student may borrow up to a maximum of $8,500 per year with a total aggregate borrowing limit (including undergraduate loans) of $65,500. Within these limits, students may borrow up to the difference between the cost of education, the family contribution, and the total of all financial aid awards. For dependent students, “family contribution” is derived from the incomes of the parents and the student. For graduate students and independent undergraduates, family contribution is based on the incomes of the student and spouse (if married). The subsidized Stafford Student Loan interest rate for all students is variable with a cap of 8.25 percent. Interest does not accrue, however, nor does repayment begin, until six months after the borrower ceases to enroll at least half time. An insurance premium of up to 1 percent as well as an origination fee of 3 percent will generally be deducted from the loan funds. Unsubsidized Stafford Student Loan Program. Students who do not qualify for subsidized Stafford Loans, or who qualify for only partially subsidized Stafford Loans, may borrow funds through this program up to the applicable federal Stafford Loan limit. Students will automatically be considered for the unsubsidized program at the same time eligibility is determined for other aid programs. Terms and conditions of borrowing are the same as for the federal subsidized Stafford Loan except that principal and interest must be paid while the student is still in school, beginning 60 days after the first loan is issued. For independent undergraduate students, this program provides additional loan eligibility beyond subsidized Stafford amounts. Independent student borrowers may receive both subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford Student Loans as follows: freshman $6,625; sophomore $7,500; junior and senior $10,500, for a combined aggregate limit of $46,000 for all undergraduate enrollment. The total combined aggregate borrowing limit, including amounts borrowed while an undergraduate, is $138,500.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students Program (FPLUS). The Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students Program enables parents of dependent undergraduate students to borrow up to an amount equal to the cost of education minus all other financial aid. No aggregate borrowing limits apply. The annual interest rate is set by a federal formula and does not exceed 9 percent. Repayment of the loan typically begins within 60 days after funds are disbursed and may extend up to 10 years. An insurance premium/guarantee fee of up to 4 percent is due at the time of disbursement. PRIVATE LOANS A variety of private student loan programs are available to both U.S. and international students attending NYU. They feature attractive terms and interest rates, and all creditworthy families facing college expenses are eligible. There are no maximum income limits. Loans are made through banks, savings and loan organizations, and other lenders. For more information, see the NYU Office of Financial Aid Web site or contact the Office of Financial Aid. EMPLOYEE EDUCATION PLANS Many companies pay all or part of the tuition of their employees under tuition refund plans. Employed students attending the University should ask their personnel officers or training directors about the existence of a company tuition plan. Students must also notify the Office of Financial Aid if they receive this benefit.

The Steinhardt School of EducationSponsored Programs Information on University Scholars (see page 172) is available from the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, 82 Washington Square East, Room 32, New York, NY 10003-6680. Candidates must be sure to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by established deadlines. THE DIVISION OF NURSING Federal Nursing Student Loans. Students awarded this loan must be enrolled for a minimum of 6 points per semester in the Division of Nursing of The Steinhardt School of Education. The amount of each loan is a maximum of $2,500 annually for the first two years of study and $4,000 annually for the final two years to an aggregate total of $13,000. Availability is limited. Interest is at the rate of 5 percent per annum beginning nine months after the student has ceased to be at least a half-time student in a

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid • 175

nursing curriculum. Deferment of repayment of the loan is granted for up to three years’ service in a uniformed service or in the Peace Corps. Repayment may extend to a period of 10 years after the nine-month period of grace after the student has ceased to be at least a half-time student in a nursing curriculum. DEPARTMENT OF NUTRITION AND FOOD STUDIES This department has a number of scholarships available for interested undergraduates. The application deadlines, award amounts, and restrictions associated with each scholarship vary. The award amounts can range from $200 to $2,500, depending on the specific scholarship for which students are being considered and the guidelines specific to each scholarship. For information on these scholarships, contact the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, Education Building, 35 West Fourth Street, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10012-1172. You may also call (212) 998-5580, or e-mail [emailprotected] The scholarships include the following: Aramark Corporation—Carol DeGuadenzi Memorial Scholarship. Tuition scholarship to honor the memory of Carol DeGuadenzi, a distinguished graduate of the department. Preference for this award is usually given to doc-

toral students in food studies and food and management, but undergraduate and master’s degree students interested in food management courses may also apply. Frank G. Elliot Scholarship. Tuition scholarship for undergraduate or graduate students in nutrition, food studies, and food management, recognizing scholastic excellence and community involvement. Kappa Omicron Nu (Alpha Rho Chapter). This scholarship is administered by Kappa Omicron Nu, a national honor society for individuals working or studying in the field of “home economics” (nutrition and food students are eligible for membership). Decision is based on scholastic excellence, previous work experience, community involvement, and dedication to the field. Comstock Michigan Fruit Scholarship. A cash award for a well-rounded student interested in pursuing a career in food studies or food management. This award is based on academic performance, as well as good work, good citizenship, and overall involvement in school and outside activities. New York Metro Roundtable for Women in Food Service. For undergraduate students who will be enrolled in the department’s food studies or restaurant management program during the applicable academic year.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Roseleen Goldstone Scholarship. This scholarship is administered by the Greater New York Dietetic Association to a third-year undergraduate college student working toward a degree in nutrition and dietetics at New York University who demonstrates academic excellence, community involvement, financial need, and proposed contributions to the field of nutrition and dietetics. André and Simone Soltner Food Education Scholarship. This scholarship is sponsored by the American Institute of Wine and Food–New York Chapter and is available to individuals interested in pursuing or furthering a career in the area of food, be it in service, production, historical studies, or distribution. All applicants must also reside in New York State or Northern New Jersey and complete all requirements of the application process. After award completion of the scholarship, students write an article about the scholarship (subject to editing) for the New York Chapter newsletter. The Department of Nutrition and Food Studies Scholarship. The department has set aside a fund from gifts and fund-raising events for small tuition scholarships to assist undergraduate or graduate students who demonstrate financial need and academic merit.

176 • Undergraduate Study • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Undergraduate Study

General Requirements All candidates are required to complete a minimum of 128 points of credit. (In some curricula a minimum of more than 128 points is required.) In a classroom course, a point of credit represents one hour of lecture or two hours of laboratory work per week for one term or the equivalent. All Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science students admitted as new freshmen will complete a minimum of 60 points of liberal arts. Bachelor of Music students admitted as new freshmen are required to complete a minimum of 40 points of liberal arts. These studies are distributed in the following areas: foreign language; expository writing; history of ideas; criticism and appreciation of music and the visual arts; literature;

Western civilization; non-Western civilization; social and behavioral science; mathematics; natural science; integrated liberal arts; and speech communication. For complete details regarding the liberal arts requirements, see page 102. Students enrolled for degree programs at New York University are expected to take their courses, including summer school, at New York University. Exceptions will be considered by the dean on a case-by-case basis and must be approved in advance.

Continuous maintenance of matriculation is required. Students should check with the Office of the University Registrar regarding the policy governing excess credits earned toward the baccalaureate degree. A student is not permitted to be matriculated for more than one degree at a time.

Transfer Students: Degree Requirements

The final 32 points must be taken under the auspices of the New York University Steinhardt School of Education within a period of five consecutive years.

To be eligible for a degree, a transfer student must complete a minimum of 32 points with an average of 2.0 or higher in courses held in The Steinhardt School of Education during two or more terms. For full details, see General Requirements, above.

All course requirements must be completed within 10 years from the date of matriculation.

Students in communication studies are required to fulfill the speech requirement.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Undergraduate Study • 177

Supervised Student Teaching Courses in supervised student teaching and field experiences are open only to matriculated students who have satisfactorily completed courses in the content area of the subject(s) they plan to teach, in the necessary pre-student-teaching fieldwork, and in professional study, which would lead to state certification. The program of these courses includes work in selected early childhood, elementary, and secondary private and public schools (teaching centers) and in other appropriate educational institutions. In addition to field supervision by faculty members, student teachers are videotaped in the field in order to analyze their teaching behavior. Taping is arranged through Professor Shuchat-Shaw in the Department of Administration, Leadership, and Technology; telephone: (212) 998-5187. Students in pre-student-teaching fieldwork are assigned to teaching centers through their departments. Arrangements should be made in the semester prior to the fieldwork. Students should consult their curriculum advisers well in advance regarding prerequisites for admission to student teaching as well as requirements for successful completion of the studentteaching course(s). Full-time employment concurrent with student teaching is prohibited. No more than 16 points should be taken during the term in which the student registers for 6 points of student teaching. Registration in less than 6 points of student teaching allows consideration of an absolute maximum of 18 points. Students must receive a recommendation from their advisers in order to take more than 16 points in any student-teaching semester. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL APPLICANTS FOR STUDENT TEACHING 1. All applicants must be matriculated for a degree at New York University during the term in which they are registered for student teaching. 2. All applicants must have an average of 2.5 in their area of specialization. An overall average of 2.5 is required in the Program in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education. 3. Transfer students from other institutions must have completed a minimum of 8 points of credit at New York University, selected in consultation with their curriculum advisers, prior to the term in which student teaching is undertaken. 4. All undergraduate applicants must take 4 points of speech at New York University or pass a qualifying examination, ideally during their first year of attendance and prior to graduation.

5. All applicants must take a physical examination at New York University, including a tuberculin tine test, within the year prior to their work with children and youth. Students who work in the field for more than a year are required to take a physical each year. 6. All applicants must be interviewed by appropriate department faculty and recommended for student teaching. ADDITIONAL PREREQUISITES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION Students in early childhood education and early childhood special education need approval of their advisers to register for field experience courses. For each course, the student must complete a field experience registration form, which is obtained from the student’s adviser at the time of mail or in-person registration. This form, signed by the adviser, is then taken to the student teaching coordinator. ADDITIONAL PREREQUISITES IN SECONDARY EDUCATION Subject matter content (teaching field or subject): Students are required to have a minimum of 36 points in their subject field. Students majoring in mathematics or foreign languages who first matriculated prior to September 1, 1993, are required to have a minimum of 24 points in these fields. Foundations of education: 12 points (includes education sequence of courses). It should be noted that several programs have been redesigned, and the foundations requirements have been changed. Applicants must check with their program advisers for upto-date requirements. Note: Several departments require students to work in tutorial and/or field programs prior to student teaching. Since each department has specific requirements, it is strongly recommended that students check requirements with their program advisers. In addition, several departments have developed additional requirements related to their state certification programs. Students must consult their advisers for information regarding the new requirements.

Teacher Certification On satisfactory completion of teaching programs (including student teaching) and degree conferral, students will have completed academic requirements for teacher certification in New York State. Notes 1. The New York State Education Department requires that all prospective teachers receive

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

instruction relating to the nature and effects of alcoholic drinks, narcotics, habit-forming drugs, school violence prevention and intervention, and signs of child abuse, including instruction in the best methods of teaching these subjects. No student will be recommended for certification who has not passed a satisfactory examination in these subjects and the best methods of teaching them. This requirement is met by successful completion of E81.1999, The Social Responsibilities of Teachers: Drug and Alcohol Education/Child Abuse Identification, and E09.1990, School Violence Prevention. 2. Effective July 1, 2001, the Education Department also requires new employees in New York State school districts, BOCES, or charter schools to be fingerprinted. This new legislation also requires applicants seeking state certification after July 1 to be fingerprinted. The legislation does not require a student teacher or a person in a field placement to be fingerprinted unless such an individual is being compensated for their service and therefore considered to be an employee. 3. Currently, all prospective teachers are required to pass the New York State Teacher Certification Examinations. Scores must be submitted to the State Education Department before it will consider issuing a certificate to teach in the public schools of New York State. Please consult your departmental certification liaison for details. 4. All prospective teachers in early childhood and elementary education must have the following, on either the undergraduate or graduate level: a. College-level work in English, mathematics, science, social studies, and a language other than English (American Sign Language is acceptable). b. A concentration in one of the liberal arts or sciences. Notice: New York State and Title II of the 1999 National Higher Education Act specify that the institutional pass rates on State Teacher Exams be published for schools offering teacher education programs. Statistics on the New York State Teacher Certification Examinations for The Steinhardt School of Education at New York University are as follows for 1999-2000: 144 students completed the Assessment of Teaching Skills—Written (ATS-W). Of those, 142 passed, and this yielded a pass rate of 99 percent. The statewide pass rate for the ATS-W is 97 percent. A total of 147 NYU students completed the Liberal Arts and Sciences Test (LAST). Of those, 143 passed, and this yielded a pass rate of 97 percent. The statewide pass rate for the LAST is 96 percent.

178 • Undergraduate Study • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

New York State Teacher Certification

complete 175 hours of professional development every five years.

New York State Teacher Certification will change on February 2, 2004. Students should be aware of their graduation date and check with their adviser to make sure they are enrolled in a curriculum that meets the current regulations (for applicants completing all requirements and applying on or before February 1, 2004) or the new regulations (for applicants completing all requirements on or after February 2, 2004). The important date is when the complete application is filed with the New York State Education Department, including the successful completion of the required New York State Teacher Certification Examinations mentioned below.1

APPLICATIONS FILED ON OR AFTER FEBRUARY 2, 2004: NEW REGULATIONS FOR INITIAL AND PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES Initial Certificate—The first teaching certificate (valid for three years) obtained by a candidate who has met the requirements of the new regulations. Requirements include the completion of a program registered under the new regulations and passing scores on the Liberal Arts and Sciences Test (LAST), the Assessment of Teaching Skills—Written (ATS-W), and the Content Specialty Test (CST).

APPLICATIONS FILED ON OR BEFORE FEBRUARY 1, 2004: CURRENT REGULATIONS FOR PROVISIONAL AND PERMANENT CERTIFICATES Provisional Certificate—The first teaching certificate (valid for five years) obtained by a candidate who has met the requirements of the current regulations. Requirements include the completion of a program registered under the current regulations and passing scores on the Liberal Arts and Sciences Test (LAST) and the Assessment of Teaching Skills—Written (ATS-W).2 Candidates currently enrolled in programs registered under the current regulations must apply and qualify for the Provisional Certificate by February 1, 2004. No Provisional Certificates will be issued after this date. Though the Provisional Certificate is valid for five years from its effective date and is renewable subject to the approval of the commissioner for good cause, the commissioner will not accept applications for renewals that are submitted after February 1, 2004. Permanent Certificate—The final teaching certificate obtained by a candidate who has met the requirements of the current regulations. Requirements include an appropriate master’s degree, two years of teaching experience, and passing scores on the Content Specialty Test (CST) and the Assessment of Teaching Skills— Performance (video) (ATS-P). Holders of the Permanent Certificate will not be required to

The Initial Certificate will be issued only to students completing programs that are now registered as leading to the Initial Certificate. If any students are expected to complete a program and apply for certification on or after February 2, 2004, they must enroll in a program leading to the Initial Certificate. Candidates receiving an Initial Certificate will need to qualify for the new Professional Certificate. Professional Certificate—The Professional Certificate is the final teaching certificate awarded that qualifies a candidate who has met the requirements of the new regulations to teach in the public schools of New York State. Requirements include an appropriate master’s degree and three years of teaching experience including one year of mentored teaching experience. Holders of the Professional Certificate will be required to complete 175 hours of professional development every five years.

completed within 10 years from the date of matriculation. Continuous maintenance is required.

Proficiency Examination in Expository Writing All freshmen and transfer students entering The Steinhardt School of Education, after completing V40.0100/V40.0110 (Writing the Essay/The Advanced College Essay) or the equivalent courses through the American Language Institute or the Higher Education Opportunity Program, must take the Proficiency Examination in Expository Writing in order to graduate. This examination is given at the end of V40.0110 or its equivalent. Students who fail the proficiency examination are required to take and pass V40.0013, Writing Tutorial, in order to graduate. V40.0013 is offered on a pass/fail basis.

New Student Seminar Participation in the New Student Seminar (E03.0001) is required of all new full-time undergraduate students during their first term in residence. The seminar acquaints students with the rationale and methods of inquiry that inform their fields of study; explores professional issues; and provides additional orientation and guidance to the school and University. Consult the Office of the Associate Dean for Student Services and Public Affairs, 82 Washington Square East, Room 32, for further information.

Maintenance of Matriculation Bachelor’s degrees: To maintain matriculation, a candidate is required to complete at New York University, under the auspices of The Steinhardt School of Education, at least one 3-point course each academic year or, in lieu of such completion, to pay a maintenance fee of $200.00 per academic year plus a nonreturnable registration and services fee. All course requirements must be

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

1

Questions not addressed by departmental advisers may be directed to The Steinhardt School of Education’s teacher certification adviser in the Office of Student Services, [emailprotected]; (212) 998-5033.

2

Even if students complete all the requirements of a program registered as leading to the new Initial Certificate, pass the required examinations, and apply for certification on or before February 1, 2004, they will still receive a Provisional Certificate.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Faculty • 179

Faculty

Department of Administration, Leadership, and Technology

instruction; the impact of distance education technologies on instruction; and training.

FULL-TIME FACULTY 2002-2003

Mary Erina Driscoll, Associate Professor. B.A. 1978, Connecticut College; M.A. 1980, Sarah Lawrence College; Ph.D. 1989, Chicago.

Terry A. Astuto, Professor. B.A. 1967, Cardinal Stritch College; M.S. 1974, Wisconsin (Milwaukee); Ed.D. 1984, Indiana. Research includes alternative organizational theories and their application to schools and the study of educational policy at federal, state, and local levels. Recent publications are about school restructuring and educational reform. Michael Bronner, Professor. B.A. 1958, M.A. 1965, San Jose State; Ph.D. 1973, New York. Status of business education studies from national and regional perspectives; models of collegiate

Research focuses on educational policy, social organization of schools, and understanding the dimensions of teachers’ work. Recent publications have dealt with factors affecting teachers’ work and the consequences of policy decisions for school community. Norman Fruchter, Clinical Professor. B.A. 1959, Rutgers; M.Ed. 1982, Columbia. Educational policy, relationship between resources and outcomes, parent activism and educational improvement, effectiveness of school reform initiatives in improving urban education.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Arthur Greenberg, Clinical Professor. B.B.A. 1968, City College; M.A. 1972, New York; M.S. 1975, Pace; Ed.D. 1987, Columbia. Research interests include executive leadership development; urban education; relationships between education and income; charter schools and other new school forms, as related to school reform efforts; school-university partnerships, particularly concurrent enrollment programs; and educational technology. Colleen L. Larson, Associate Professor. B.A. 1976, M.S. 1979, Ph.D. 1984, Wisconsin (Madison). Research interests include organization theory and leadership within the sociopolitical context of urban school environments. Recent publications examine how conventional organizational

180 • Faculty • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

systems, assumptions, and practices generate school community conflict and contribute to greater inequality in education. Patrick G. Love, Associate Professor. B.A. 1979, M.S./C.A.S. 1981, SUNY (Albany); Ph.D. 1990, Indiana. Spiritual development of college students, organizational culture and transformation, and the experiences of marginalized students. Teaching interests include student development theory, organizational theory, institutional assessment, and administrative practices. Coauthored the books Leadership and Management Issues for a New Century and Understanding and Applying Cognitive Development Theory, as well as numerous articles. Awarded Outstanding Contribution to Higher Education by College Student Personnel Association of New York State (October 2001). Ann Marcus, Professor. B.A. 1965, Brandeis; M.Sc. 1966, London School of Economics; Ed.D. 1989, Columbia.

and Web-based applications, interface design, on-line course design, and design of knowledge management systems. Recent publications focus on cognitive aspects of multimedia learning and on the design of knowledge management systems. W. Michael Reed, Professor. B.A. 1972, M.A. 1976, Ed.D. 1984, Virginia Tech. Research focuses on uses of technology and computers in classrooms and the implications for accommodating learner differences through cognitive science perspectives. Richard C. Richardson, Jr., Professor. B.S. 1954, Castleton State College; M.A. 1958, Michigan State; Ph.D. 1963, Texas (Austin). Research in higher education with focuses on policy, governance, and issues of access and equity. Current focus is on international policy issues in postsecondary education. Areas of expertise include university and community college administration, policy analysis, and research.

Special interests in adult and continuing education and community college education. Currently serves as dean of The Steinhardt School of Education.

Francine Shuchat-Shaw, Associate Professor. A.A. 1967, Stephens College; B.S. 1969, M.A. 1971, Ph.D. 1976, Ohio State.

Teboho Moja, Clinical Professor. B.A. 1977, B.Ed. 1979, North (South Africa); M.Ed. 1982, Witwatersrand (South Africa); Ph.D. 1985, Wisconsin (Madison).

Instructional design for video and interactive video programs; educational video and film production and postproduction; critical evaluation of instructional materials.

Specialist in education policy, institutional development, and change. Research and experience in policy research in the area of transformation strategies and new policy initiatives. Experience as special adviser to the minister of education, South Africa; general manager for educational broadcasting at the South African Broadcasting Corporation; and executive director and commissioner of the National Commission on Higher Education, South Africa.

PART-TIME FACULTY

Bridget O’Connor, Professor. B.A. 1973, Evansville; M.S. 1978, Ph.D. 1983, Indiana.

David F. Finney, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.

Effective applications of technology to instruction and other group communications and processes; curriculum development in information systems and corporate training. Her publications include End-User Information Systems (Macmillan, 1994). Jan M. Plass, Assistant Professor. M.A. 1990, Ph.D. 1994, Erfurt (Germany). Research interests include cognitive aspects of learning from the different media, especially individual differences in multimedia learning, and instructional design for the Web. Areas of expertise are instructional design of multimedia

Sara Arthur, B.A., M.A., M.Ed., Ed.D. William R. Beck, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Lynne P. Brown, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Chester Delaney, B.A., M.A. Barbara Ebenstein, B.A., M.A., J.D. Sean Fanelli, B.S., Ph.D. David Gee, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. Arnold L. Goren, B.S., M.A. Thomas W. Grace, B.A., M.S., Ed.S., Ed.D. Nancy J. Grossman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Irene Hylton, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. Keith J. Jepsen, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. Joel Levy, B.S., Ph.D. Leonard Majzlin, B.S. Betsy Newman, B.A., M.A. Robert Riccobono, B.S., M.B.A.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Steven Shapiro, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. Nathalis Wamba, M.A., Ph.D.

AFFILIATED FACULTY LaRuth H. Gray, Adjunct Associate Professor. B.A., M.A., Ed.D. Director, Educational Administration Placement Services; Associate Director, Metropolitan Center for Urban Education.

Department of Applied Psychology FULL-TIME FACULTY 2002-2003 LaRue Allen, Raymond A. and Rosalee G. Weiss Professor of Applied Psychology. B.A. 1972, Radcliffe College; M.S. 1977, Ph.D. 1980, Yale. Adolescent development; early childhood; parentchild relationships; primary prevention of mental disorders; impact of social, cultural, and ecological factors on human development. Judith Alpert, Professor. B.A. 1966, Tufts; M.A. 1969, Ph.D. 1973, Columbia. Trauma, contemporary psychoanalytic theory; gender and development; professional issues; qualitative research methodology. Joshua Aronson, Assistant Professor. B.A. 1986, California (Santa Cruz); Ph.D. 1992, Princeton. Impact of stereotypes and prejudice on development; self-concept, and academic achievement of minority children and adolescents. Lawrence Balter, Professor. B.B.A. 1960, M.S.E. 1962, City College; Ph.D. 1968, New York. Child development, parent-child relations, psychoanalytic theory, psychology in the media, parent education. Ester Buchholz, Associate Professor. B.A. 1961, Hunter College; Ph.D. 1968, New York. Aloneness as a developmental need; self-regulation, self-reliance, and alone time; teenage pregnancy; parenthood; developmental psychoanalytic theory. Ronald P. Esposito, Associate Professor. B.S. 1966, Georgetown; M.S. 1969, Ph.D. 1974, Fordham. Group dynamics, consultation, cross-cultural counseling, and organizational development/ work redesign; emphasis on primary prevention and social, political, and economic influences.

The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004 • Faculty • 181

Iris Fodor, Professor. B.A. 1956, City College; M.A. 1957, Ph.D. 1964, Boston.

Robert March, Visiting Assistant Professor. B.A. 1988, Colorado; Ph.D. 1998, Oregon.

Mothers and daughters, adolescent body image, and eating behavior with a cross-cultural focus; use of photographs for the study of self-image; children’s development of subjective awareness; children/adolescent response to stress and grief; interpersonal conflict resolution.

Teaching interests include educational psychology, behavioral assessment, and behavioral consultation. His areas of expertise include schoolwide behavior support, dropout prevention, functional behavioral assessment, linking assessment to intervention, curricular and instructional adaptation, and curriculum development for students with severe disabilities. His current research interests include schoolwide behavior patterns, efficient and effective use of functional assessment methodology to develop individual support plans, and early intervention to prevent reading failure.

Perry N. Halkitis, Assistant Professor. B.A. 1984, Columbia; M.S. 1988, Hunter College; M.A. 1993, Ph.D. 1995, Graduate Center, CUNY. HIV primary and secondary prevention; measurement and impacts of medication adherence, substance abuse, and HIV transmission; perceptions and attitudes toward high-risk sexual behaviors; gay and HIV identities; test and scale development of high-risk behaviors; computerized certification, licensure, and achievement testing; development and evaluation of communitybased health programs. Bruce Homer, Assistant Professor. B.Sc. 1992, Dalhousie; M.A. 1995, Ph.D. 2000, Toronto. The influence of culture on cognitive development; cross-cultural psychology; early stages of literacy acquisition and metalinguistic awareness; language and representational abilities in young children; theory of mind. Barbara Hummel-Rossi, Associate Professor. B.A. 1964, SUNY (Albany); Ph.D. 1971, SUNY (Buffalo). Research methodology and applications; development of evaluation methodology; aptitude, achievement, and personality test development. Theresa Jordan, Associate Professor, B.A. 1971, M.A. 1972, Ph.D. 1979, New York. The role of psychology in clinical medicine; bias in health care delivery; decision analysis and artificial intelligence; psychological aspects of international public health. Samuel Juni, Professor. B.S. 1973, Brooklyn College; M.A. 1975, Ph.D. 1978, SUNY (Buffalo). Psychopathology and differential diagnostics; operationalizing psychoanalytic constructs and personality assessment theory and test construction; defense mechanisms and object relations; recovery from addiction; cross-cultural psycholinguistics. Bernard Katz, Professor. B.A. 1954, Brooklyn College; M.A. 1955, Ph.D. 1962, New York. Individual and group counseling supervision, theory, practice, and research; the social and political context of counseling.

Jacqueline Mattis, Assistant Professor. B.A. 1989, New York; M.A. 1992, Ph.D. 1995, Michigan.

Lisa Suzuki, Assistant Professor. B.A. 1983, Whitman College; M.Ed. 1985, Hawaii; Ph.D. 1992, Nebraska. Multicultural assessment and counselor training; qualitative research methods; intelligence testing with diverse populations. Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, Associate Professor. B.A. 1983, Ph.D. 1987, New York. Cognitive development, language acquisition, memory, and symbolic play across the first three years; emphasis on parenting views and behaviors and larger contextual influences on the unfolding abilities of healthy and at-risk infants; intervention studies with families and children from birth to three years. Niobe Way, Assistant Professor. B.A. 1985, California (Berkeley); Ed.D. 1994, Harvard.

Roles of religion and spirituality in meaningmaking, coping, and relational life, especially in the lived experiences of African American men and women; gender studies/women’s studies; cultural psychology; ideology/church studies.

Social development among urban, poor, and working adolescents and young adults; resiliency among at-risk adolescents; the impact of ecological contexts on adolescent development; qualitative research methods.

Mary McRae, Associate Professor. B.A. 1971, City College; M.S. 1976, Brooklyn College; Ed.D. 1987, Columbia.

Willavene Wolf, Professor. B.S. 1954, Rio Grande College; M.A. 1957, Ph.D. 1960, Iowa.

Multicultural counseling; group dynamics specializing in T group and Tavistock models; program evaluation; development training and supervision of counselors; race and sex discrimination. Gigliana Melzi, Assistant Professor. B.A. 1989, Clark; M.A. 1992, Ph.D. 1997, Boston. Language and literacy development with special focus on the acquisition of discourse and narrative skills in preschool children. Emphasis on the influence of social and cultural factors in children’s linguistic development, especially in the context of parent-child interactions. David Peterson, Assistant Professor. A.A.S. 1987, Rock Valley College; B.A. 1991, M.A. 1993, Northern Illinois; Ph.D. 1996, Wisconsin (Madison). Computer-based training in clinical problem solving for rehabilitation counseling and psychology, with specific foci in case management and ethical problem solving. Clinical interests in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, developmental disabilities, and psychiatric rehabilitation. Mary Sue Richardson, Professor. B.A. 1967, Marquette; Ph.D. 1972, Columbia. Life-span developmental psychology in the context of gender, race, and class; work in people’s lives; feminist philosophy/counseling women; supervision and training; psychoanalytic theory and psychotherapy.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Cognitive development; language development; teacher-child interactions as related to literacy development; relationship between reading/writing. Maureen McGinnis Wycisk, Clinical Assistant Professor. B.A. 1972, Moorehead State; M.A. 1997, New York. Reading process; practical application of techniques for integrating direct skills instruction with literature-based literacy development; relating reading process to content areas in primary, middle, and secondary schools.

PART-TIME FACULTY Michael Dealy, B.A., M.A., M.S., Ph.D. Richard Grallo, B.A., M.S., M.A., Ph.D. Christiane Sander Manzella, B.M., M.M., M.A., Ph.D. Gilbert Trachtman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

182 • Faculty • The Steinhardt School of Education Bulletin 2002-2004

Department of Art and Art Professions FULL-TIME FACULTY 2002-2003 Nancy Barton, Clinical Associate Professor. B.F.A. 1982, M.F.A. 1984, California Institute of the Arts. A practicing artist who works in photography, performance, and mixed-media installation, her work has been exhibited internationally, including the MoMA (New York), the Long Beach Museum, and the Shoshana Wayne Gallery (Los Angeles). Her interests include feminism, postcolonial theory, and psychoanalysis. Director of undergraduate programs. Benjamin Binstock, Assistant Professor. B.A. 1984, M.A. 1988, California (Berkeley); Ph.D. 1997, Columbia. A scholar of Renaissance, baroque, and modern art, history, and methodology of art history, as well as critical theory. Translated and written on the Austrian formalist Aloïs Riegl and on Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Van Gogh. Other professional interests include deconstruction and psychoanalysis. Peter Campus, Clinical Associate Professor. B.S. 1960, Ohio State. Recognized as a pioneer in video art and in computer-enhanced digital photography; represented by Paula Cooper Gallery; one-person shows in major museums throughout the world and in distinguished group exhibitions featuring art on the cutting edge. Dipti Desai, Assistant Professor. Diploma 1981, National Institute of Design, India; M.Ed. 1986, Columbia; M.A. 1984, Ph.D. 1995, Wisconsin (Madison). Director of Art Education Program. Research interests include critical pedagogy in art education, feminism, and postcolonial theory. Marilynn Gelfman Karp, Professor. B.F.A. 1960, M.A. 1962, Hunter College; Ph.D. 1965, New York. Director, 80 Washington Square East Galleries, Broadway Windows, and Washington Square Windows. Director of internships and residency in Visual Art Programs. Expertise in folk art, Americana, collecting, contemporary art, and art history. Active exhibiting sculptor. Carlo M. Lamagna, Clinical Associate Professor. B.A., 1969, College of the Holy Cross; M.A. 1971, Massachusetts. Expertise in modern and contemporary art and material culture. Management consultant for nonprofit and historic preservation organiza-

tions. Board member, Committee on Museum Professional Training of the American Association of Museums; member, Education Committee, College Art Association. Former curator, independent art consultant, and gallerist. Sandra Lang, Clinical Assistant Professor. B.A. 1972, Middlebury College; M.B.P. 1983, Columbia. Director of the Visual Arts Administration Program. Extensive experience in both nonprofit and profit organizations. Formerly administrative director, Art Advisory Service, Museum of Modern Art, and executive director, Independent Curators International. Adviser to corporations and not-for-profit organizations on administrative, programmatic, and fund-raising issues. Gerald Pryor, Associate Professor; Artist-inResidence. B.A. 1968, Trinity College; M.A. 1976, Hunter College. Photographer and performance artist, one-person and group shows in New York, Korea, and China. Two grants from National Endowment for the Arts.

Judith Reiter Weissman, Associate Professor. B.A. 1961, Barnard; M.A. 1962, Ph.D. 1970, Pennsylvania. Expertise in women’s art and culture. Author of books and articles on folk art and textiles. Frequent lecturer on women artists and 20thcentury art. Other professional interests include the relationship between food and culture, feminism, and film.

PART-TIME FACULTY Art in Media Markam Keith Adams, B.A., M.A. Phyllis Baldino, B.F.A. Burt Barr, B.A. Zoe Beloff, M.A., M.F.A. Samuel Cucher, B.F.A., M.F.A. Sue DeBeer, B.F.A., M.F.A. Sigrid Hackenberg, B.A., M.A.

Jack Risley, Clinical Associate Professor. B.A. 1982, Oberlin College; M.F.A. 1986, Yale.

Jenny del Corte Hirschfeld, M.A.

A sculptor who is represented by Postmasters Gallery in New York; numerous one-person exhibitions in New York; solo shows in Boston and Cologne. Recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Grant, a Tiffany Foundation Award, a Marie Sharpe Walsh Foundation Grant, and other awards.

Laura Parnes, B.F.A.

Judith S. Schwartz, Associate Professor. B.A. 1964, Queens College; M.A. 1969, Ph.D. 1983, New York. Critic, curator, and author of national and international articles on contemporary craft issues. Invited member, International Academy of Ceramics. Chair for two international conferences held at NYU: “Case for Clay in Secondary Education” and “Criticism in the Crafts Arts: Crossings, Alignments, and Territories.” Educational consultant to Lenox China Company; Board of Directors of Watershed and Studio Potter magazi